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Publication numberUS1125781 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1915
Filing dateJul 24, 1912
Priority dateJul 24, 1912
Publication numberUS 1125781 A, US 1125781A, US-A-1125781, US1125781 A, US1125781A
InventorsRalph A Waldman
Original AssigneeRalph A Waldman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Milk-bottle case.
US 1125781 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. A. WALDMAN.

MILK BOTTLE CASE. APPLIOATION FILED JULY24, 1912.

Patented Jan. 19, 1915.

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MILK-BOTTLE CASE.

' Applicationfiled July 24, 1912. Serial No. 711,336.

To all whomz't may concern Be it known that I, RALPH A. W iLDMArI, a citizen of the United States, residing in the city and county of San Francisco, State of California, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Milk-Bottle Cases, of

which the following. is a specification.

-My invention relates to cases for milk bottles, wherein empty milk bottles are placed, as they are received from the consumer, and remain while they are being washed, filled, capped and during transportation back to the consumer.

The objects of my invention are, first,

sanitation, second, cheapness and simplicity" of construction, third, durability, fourth, to provide means for retaining the bottles in the case while the same is inverted when passing through the washing machine, and to prevent the bottles from being jarred and jolted during transportation, and thus eliminate the noise consequent upon such jarring, and fifth, to provide means for preserving the alinement of the cases when the same are stacked in the refrigerator or during transportation, and sixth, to provide a case which will allow free circulation of cold air around the bottles during the process of refrigeration.

For a clear comprehension of my invention reference should be had to the accompanying drawings forming part of this specification, in which Figure 1 is a broken plan view of my milk bottle case, disclosing the construction thereof. Fig. 2 is a broken side elevation,

disclosing more fully the retaining springs integral with the corrugated partitions. Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail view of one corner'of two stacked cases disclosing the .method of preserving the alinement.

I am aware that heretofore milk-bottle cases have been invented and are in use for transporting milk-bottles through washing machines and back to the consumer. Some cases are constructed of wood having partitions and bottoms of longitudinally and transversely disposed rods, also inserted or attached devices at each of the four upper corners for preserving the alinement of the cases when stacked. Other cases have been constructed of metal sides and ends, with partitions and bottoms simi lar to those in the wooden cases. Both cases have proven unsatisfactory for the followingreasons.

The wooden casesnecessitate the application of a metal re-inforcing strip around specification of Letters;Pa. tent. =Patented Jan. 19, 1915.

each end and metal shoes attached to each of the four lower corners to lessen the wear caused by friction while the case is being pushed through the washing machine.

The strong detergent that is used to cleanse the bottles causes rapid disintegration of the wooden portion of the cases, and

. consequently the cases wear out in a very short length of time. Also, the 'disintegra tion of the wooden portion of the cases produces a moist pulp which is sometimes transferred to the bottles after the same have left the washing machine, necessitating the rewashing of the bottles in another case. To

obviate this condition other-boxes are made with metal sides and ends.

, Both metal and wooden boxes with closed sides do not fully expose the filled bottles to the cold air currents in the refrigerator when the cases are stacked. .Also the style of case now in use have no means for retainmg the bottles within the cases when the said cases are inverted while going through the washing machine. To retainthe bottles within the cases during the operation a retaining frame is placed over the cases before thev are inverted and must be removed when thecases have passed through the washing machine.

A'further disadvantage of the metal cases is that they create considerable noise when the action of the vehicle in which they are being transported to the consumer. jars the bottles and causes them to come into contact with the sides of the said metal case.

My invention is designed to overcome these several disadvantages as well as 'to provide acase thatis light, simple and of open construction, durable and sanitary, also to provide a case where no separate retaining frame is required to retain the bottles when the same is inverted in the washing machine and hasno separate means for alinement.

The numeral 1 is used to. designate an upper rectangular frame. preferably of angle iron, to which a similar' lower frame 2 is secured by means of corner angles 3. The upper ends 3' of the corner angles 3 extend above the upper surface of theupper recthe upper ends B' of the lower case will enhorizontal frames 1 and 2.

gage the inner surface of the lower rectangular frame 2 and preserve the alinement of the cases so stacked, (Fig. 3). A.

further object of this arrangement is that the weight of the uppercases' will be borne partly bythe corner angles 3, and thus relieve the shear on the rivets uniting the vertical and horizontal angles, the angles 3 being capable of sustaining a greater weight by reason of their perpendicular position than the horizontal angles comprising the "An intermediate frame 4, having a longitudinal member. 4, is secured to, the corner angles 3.. Riveted to the frame 4 and the member 4 are corrugated strips 5 having springs 5' integral "therewith and adapted to engageand retain the bottles B in pockets formed by the corrugations of the strips 5, when the caseis'inverted.

Supporting strips 6, reinforced by the lateral members .6, are secured to the lower frame 2 .for the support of the bottles in the case. y

The bottles; B when received from the consumer, are placed in the pockets formed by the corrugated strips 5 and retained therein by means of the springs 5. The tension of these springs 5 is suflicient to retain the bottles B within the case when the same is inverted while going through the washing machine. This holds the bottles in such a position that the streams of water are free to. enter the bottles and also to allow'the same to drain thoroughly before they are again turned upright.

In the cases at present in use,'the retaining frames are removed as soon as the cases are removed from the washing machines necessitating the revers ng of the case so that the bottles will remain therein. Any

water that is left adhering to the insides of the bottles must necessarily drain into the ottles. Should the bottles be left in an the purposeof draining, a greater number of retaining'frames order to accommodate the draining cases as well as the cases passing throughthe washing machine. a Y It is evident from the foregoingthat I have provided e-case that is simple of construction and consequently can be produced cheaply.

cases containing the The lack of largesurfaces and wooden corners, produces a sanitary case, inasmuch as it can-easily be cleaned or sterilized without causing "disintegration. The open nature of its construction is adapted to freely admit the cooling air currents of the refrigerator and at the'sametime, materially lessen the weightof the case.

The integral means for retaining the alinement' of the cases'when sta ed, is an advantage, inasmuch as they are inverted position for would be required in ,tles within the producedwithin for instance, of aser es of 1. A milk bottle case comprising upper" afid lower rectangulaf frames; corner angles un ting the sald upper and lower rectangular frames; an intermediate frame secured .tothe corner angles; a centrally-disposed longitudinal bar secured to the intermediate frame; corru ated strips secured to the intermediate mine and centrally disposed longitudinal bar';-and longitudinal supports secured to the lower rectangular frame and lying strips.

2. A milk bottle'case below and between the corrugated of any to secure by 'Letcomprising .upper and lower rectangular frames; corner angle iron secured to the upper and lower frames and having the upper ends extendingiabo've the upperiframe and the lower ends'th'ereof receded'within the lower edge of the lower frame; an intermediate'frame secured to the corner angle irons between the upperandlower frames; corrugated strips secured to the intermediate frames and adapted to form pockets for the reception of milk bottles; means integral with .the corrugated strips and adapted to retain bottles Within the pockets when the case is inverted; and

means secured to the lower frame and adapt ed to support bottles within the pockets when the case 1s upright.

3. A milk bottle case comprising upper and lower-rectangular frames; corner angle IIOHS secured to the upper and lower frames and having the upper ends extending above the upper frame andgthelower ends thereof receded within the lower edge. of the lower frame an intermediate frame secured tothe cornerangle irons between the upper and lower frames; a centrally disposed longitul dinal bar secured to the-intermediate frame; corrugated strips secured to the intermediate frame and centrally disposed bar and adapted to form pocketsfor thereception of milk bottles; spring fin ers integral with thecorru I milk bott es within thepockets [when the case is inverted;,and. means secured to the lower frame and adapted to s pockets when right.

" milk ai-Sana.

' and lower rectangular frames; corner angle ated strips an adapted to retainv I lipporttheboteiSPP- irons secured to the upper and lower frames and having the upper ends extending above the upper frame and the lower ends thereof receded within the lower edge of the lower frame; an intermediate frame secured to the corner angle irons between the upper and lower frames; a centrally disposed longitudinal bar secured to the intermediate frame; corrugated strips secured to the intermediate frame and centrally disposed bar and adapted to form pockets for the reception of milk bottles; spring fingers integral with the corrugated strips and adapted to retain milk bottles within the pockets when the case is inverted;

and longitudinal straps secured to the lower rectangular frame and directly under the pockets formed by the corrugated strips and adapted to support bottles within the pockets when the case is upright; and lateral straps secured to the longitudinal straps and to the lower rectangular frame.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my signature in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

BALPH A. WALDMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2778524 *Jan 15, 1954Jan 22, 1957Wheeling Steel CorpBottle crate and cell unit therefor
US3362577 *Oct 17, 1966Jan 9, 1968Abraham KolkerBeverage carriers
US5261208 *Oct 9, 1992Nov 16, 1993Lockhart Walter RTamper-proof carton and method for using same in retailing food and drug products
WO1997012814A1 *Oct 6, 1995Apr 10, 1997Joanne ShefflinReusable container for carrying baby feeding products
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/513, 220/DIG.200, 220/518, 220/509
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/305, Y10S220/02