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Publication numberUS1133322 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 30, 1915
Filing dateMay 8, 1914
Priority dateMay 8, 1914
Publication numberUS 1133322 A, US 1133322A, US-A-1133322, US1133322 A, US1133322A
InventorsFrank A Seiberling
Original AssigneeFrank A Seiberling
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of rubberizing fabric.
US 1133322 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P. A. SEIBERLING.

PROCESS OF RUBBER-IZING FABRIC.

APPLICATION FILED MAY 8, 1914.

L3]. SQ SQQ, Patented Mar. 30, 1915.

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F, A. SEIBERLING.

PROCESS OF RUBBERIZING FABRIC.

APPLIGATION FILED MAY 8, 1914.

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F. A. SEIBBRLING.

PROCESS OF EUBBERIZING FABRIC.

APPLICATION FILED MAY 8, 1914.

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wmwm 1,. d 5% f v I WWW F. A. SEIBERLING.

PROCESS OF RUBBERIZING FABRIG..

APPLICATION FILED MAY 8, 1914.

L1 3mm Patented Mar. 30, 1915.

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FRANK A. SEIBERLING, OF AKRON, OHIO.

iefiociiss or ircrnnmzme FABRIC.

Specification of Letters Patent. Pmtlgnjtngidl Mair, 3m, 1915 Application filed may a, 191i. Serial No. 837,145.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that l[, FRANK A. SEIBERLING, a citizen of the United States, residing at Akron, in the county of Summit and State of Ohio, have invented new and useful I mprovements in Processes of Rubberizmg Fabric, of which the following is a speclfication.

This invention relates to a process for coating a fabric, especially a textile fabric with a plastic covering, and the specific object of the process is to coat a fabric with rubber on both sides and finally cover one of the rubber-coated sides with an additional skim coating of rubber, and toso carry out this process that the application thereof is continuous, to the end that no interruption will take place in the projection of a. continuousstrip of prepared fabric, so that the fabric may be spooled up after the completion of the process ready for use in the arts wherein it may be employed, but it may be stated that it is especially adapted for use in connection with the making of outer tire-shoes of double-tube pneumatic tires.

lln carrying into effect my improved process ll make use of certain mechanical instrumentalities a. preferred type of which 1s shown in the accompanying drawings in which similar reference numerals indicate like parts in the difi'erent figures, but it is to be understood that various changes and; modifications may be made in the construction of the instrumentalities shown without in any manner departing from the "scope of the matter hereinafter claimed.

lln the drawings, Figures 1 and 2, are views in side elevation of two .ortions of the mechanism employed in carrying out this process," the mechanism bein shown inthese two figures diagrammatica-l the mechanism shown in Fig. 1 showin a portion of the mechanism and Fig. 2 the alance; Figs. 3 and 4, are front and side views respectively of a tension device employed; Fig. 5, is a view in side elevation of a preferred form of selvage cutter employed; Figs. '6 and 7 are respectively sectional and side elevations of the device shown in Fig. 5;

-. Figs. 8 and 9, are details of portions of the mechanism shown in Fig. 5; and, Fig. 10, is

a sectional view of a shown in Fig. 5. I

'lhe fabric of commerce is usually supportion of the device plied in the form of bolts of limited length;

bolts be united together to thereby form a continuous strip of an indefinite length. In order to unite the ends of the fabric of different bolts together a sewing machine of any preferred type is employed and it is usually positioned between two of the loosely-folded and unwrapped stacks of fab ric, and the sewing machine of whateveidesign is diagrammatically shown in the drawing and designated by the reference letter C.

Of course, the position of the sewing machine is immaterial, so long as it occupies a suitable position to accomplish the uniting of short sections together. The fabric is customarily fed to the sewing machine and guided through the medium of an idler roll 1 and the fabric, after the sewing operation, is carried from the settling machine par- .tially around a second idler roll 2.

The strip of fabric herein designated by the reference letter D is carried without be- 1 ing under tension from the top of the stack B to a tension device E, of any preferred form, but the type of tension device which I customarily use is shown in Figs. 3 and 4 and forms the subject matter of a co-pending application of Edward Nall, Serial No. 83 ,205, filed May 8, 1914:, to the details of construction whereof no claim is herein made, but for the sake of clearness, a description thereof follows.

Tension dem'ce.-The' tension device E shown in Fig. 1 consists of a pair of upright housings 3 and 4 positioned opposite to one another and each provided with a central opening 5 the side edges 6 of which are equipped to constitute slides. Mounted in the upper portionfof the slides 6 are journal boxes 7 for the reduced ends 8 of a roll 9. The two boxes 7 are provided on their upper faces with socket members 10 to receive the lower headed ends of threaded shafts 11 which pass upwardly through suitably threaded openings in the housings 3 and 4:. The upper parts of-these housings are provided with U-shaped portions 12 to provide spaces 13 in which are positioned wormthe threaded shafts 11. Mounted in' suit-- able bearings 15 on the housings 3 and 4 is arotatable shaft 16 arranged parallel to the axis of the roll '9, and on this shaft are a. pair of worms 17 each of which intermeshes with one of the worm wheels 14. The shaft 16 is equipped with a hand wheel 18 by which its rotation is secured. It will be seen that by rotating the hand wheel 18 causing thereby simultaneously rotation of the worm wheels 14 and threaded. shaft 16, the vertical adjustment of the upper roll 9 is possible.

Positionedbelow each journal box 7 in the slidesv 6 is a journal box 19 and in these boxes 19 are mounted the reduced ends 20 of a lower roller 21. The lower portions of ings fora rock-shaft 22, and it may be stated that these hearings usually consist simply of alined apertures of similar size formed in the lower portions of each of the housings. Each of the housings above the bearings for the shaft 22 are provided with curved slots 23 and 24 respectively, both of which are positioned at the lower portlons of the openings 5v in the housings and in open communication therewith. These slots are formed in the arcs of circles of Which the axis ,of the shaft 22 is the center. Mounted on one end of the shaft 22 outside of the housing 3 is a lever '25 hearing a pin '26 suitably positioned to be received in the slot 23 and the opposite end of the shaft 22 outside of the housing 4 is provided with a rocking arm 27 provided with a pin 28 adapted to move in the slot 24. It will be noted that the pins 26 and 28 project inwardly into the openings 5 in the housings 3 and 4 a suflicient distance to permit the lower faces of the boxes 19 carrying the lower roll 21 to rest thereon so that when the lever 25 is shifted to the position shown in the drawings the roll 21 is raised to its upper position and when the lever is shifted to the left in Fig. 4 to bring the pins 26 and 28 into the lateral portion of the grooves 23 and 24, the journal boxes 19 are permitted to descend by gravity therebylowering the roll 21. I The housings 3 and 4are also provided with bearings 29 in which are mounted the reduced ends of shafts 30 of an idler roll 31 which is positioned to one side .of the two rolls 9 and 21, butfapproximately centrally of the axes of the two. On

the opposite side of the rolls 9, and 21 the housings 3 and 4 are provided with journal bearings32 in which are mounted the ends of a shaft 33 of an idler roll 34. V j

The operation of the device is as follows: The lever 25 is shifted to the position shown inFig. 4 and thestrip of fabric D is extended from the top of .the stack B to the lower part of said roll 21 and from ,1

thence around the lower portion of the roll to the lower portion of, the idler roll 31, around itto the lower portion of the roll 9, and fromthence, if desired, the fabric after passing partially around the upper roll 9, may be carried directly upward and around a pair of idler rolls 35 and 36. In order to interpose a requisite amount of tension on the fabric the hand wheel 18 is rotated to lower the roll 9 until the fabric passing to the left in Fig. 4, over the upper portion ofthe lower roll 21 will be in rubbing-engagement with the fabric passing to the right over the lower face of the roller 9, thereby setting up frictional engagement between the two portions of the fabric sufiicient to keep it at all times .taut and-the friction interposed: Oil]. the strip maybe varied by operati ng the hand-wheel 18.

' Should it be desired at any time to release the tension quickly or to thread the de vice, the lever 25 is shifted to the left in 'Fig. 4, thereby quickly lowering the roll 21, releasing the tension without operating the wheel 18..

After passing over the idler roll 36 the strip of fabric is carried to a calender, designated generally by the reference letter F consisting of a pair of housings 37 in which are a series of three rolls 38, 39 and 40, all operated in'the usual manner common to calenders, and it is believed a further description thereof is unnecessary. The housings 37 are equipped with journal bearings for an idler roll 41 around which the strip passes. A mass of raw rubber or other substance 42 with which it is desired to coat one face of the strip of material D is placed between the rolls 38 and 39, and during the rotation of these two it passes in a thin film aroundthe face of the roll 39. The strip of fabric D is carried first around the idler roll 41 and from thence around the roll 40, passing between it and the intermediate roll 39. During its passage between the rollers 39 and 40 it is coated on its under face with a thin coating of rubber from the mass 42 which through the action of the calender is pressed into the interstices in the strip. After leaving the calender F the strip is carried to a" tension'ing device denominated generally by the reference letter G the specific construction of which forms no part of this'invention, but a preferred type of tensioning device for accomplishing the function which it is desired this shall accomplish is shown and described in the application of Edward Nell and William C. Tyler, tensi'oning device, filed April 7, 1913, Serial No. 759,501, to which reference is hereby made. It may be stated briefly-, however, that'the device embodies a pair of idler rolls 43 and 44 spaced from each other and between them is a vertically-shiftable roller 45, which is held in its upper POSitinn by around the roll 44. From the tension device G the strip passes to a calender H comprising a pair of housings 46 in which are rotatably mounted a-series of three calender rolls 4:7, 48 and-49. The strip passes between the lower rolls-4:8-and 49. The strip passes between the lower rolls 48 and 49 and a mass of uncured rubber 50 is placed between the rolls 47 and 48 and during the revolution of the rolls it passes down in a thin film and-is superposed on the upper face of the strip D and is by the pressure exerted by the rollers 48 and49 pressed into the interstices of the fabric.

Experience has shown that after being coated on both sides with the layer of rubber the fabric is apt to become ever heated and it thereby becomes of vital importance that the temperature of the moving strip D is reduced, both for the sake of rendering the work effective and to prevent danger of burning thesame. 'For this purpose there is positioned adjacent to the calender a cooling device designated generally by the reference letter T, comprising a frame 51 on one side of which isamounted an idler roll 52 around which the strip passes, and above this idler roll is a hollow drum 53 in which is a cooling agent such as water for keeping the temperature thereof as low as possible and during the passing of the fabric around the face 53 the-temperature is controlled. From the roll 53. the. strip passes over an uppershiftable idler roll-54': which constitutes a tension device and performs the same function as does the shiftable roll 45 in the tensiondevice (Sh-and from thence to a lateral roll 55 and from thence rearwardly around a roll 56 which may, if desired, be-

cooled in the same manner as has been de scribed with reference to the roll 53. With the fabric cooled suficiently to make it safe to be operated upon, it is then carried to a trimming device fortrimmin the selvages and truing the edges ,thereo and hereinafter known as theselvage trimmer and designatedv in Fig. 1 by the reference letter J.

Sela-Jaye trimmer.-The mechanism for trimming the selvage edges of the continuous strip of coated fabric may be of any preferred or desired construction so long as it accomplishes the function of actually and truly trimming the selvage from the advancing strip of material. However, I preferably employ a type of selvage trimmer such as is shown and described in the application of Arthur P. Lewis for selvage trim mer, SerialNo. 837,730 filed of even date herewith, a description of which is as follows: The device embodies a supporting frame 60 provided with legs 61, arranged in pairs and said pairs positioned on opposite sides of the moving strip and with the frame 60 extending transversely under the strip. The upper face of the frame 60 is provided with transversely extending dove tailed projections 62 constituting ways for the transverse sliding movement of a pair of selvage cutters one of which is mounted on each side of the strip to be trimmed, and as they are identical it is believed that a description of one will sufiice for the explanation of both. Adapted to be mounted in the ways 62 is a platform 63 provided with a dove-tailed recess to receive the dove-tailed projection 62 so that any mechanism mounted on either platform, 63 may be shifted toward and away from the central longitudinal line of the strip. Inorder to eflect this movement of each of the platforms 63 there are provided in the frame 60 threaded shafts 64 provided with hand-wheels 65 and which receive depending nuts 66 secured to the under face of each of the tables 63, and as the hand-wheels 65 are rotated the platforms are transversely shifted at will. Mounted on each of the frames 60 is a supporting frame 67 preferably somewhat in the shape of an inverted U and on the upper faces of these oppositely-disposed faces 67 are a plurality of pairs of journalbearings 68, 69, 70 and 71. -Mounted in these journal bearings are the axles of a plurality of idler rolls 72, 73, 74: and 75. The two intermediate rolls 7 3 and 74 are slightly elevated above the end rolls 74 and 75 and all of these rolls are adapted to support and assist the progress of the continuous strip of coated fabric which passes over the upper portions of their peripheries. As before stated, the mechanism on each side of the strip is the same, and hence, the description applicable to one applies with equal force with. respect to the companion mechanism on the opposite side of the device.

Mounted on each of the platforms 63 and Shiftable therewith is a hollow box-like casing 76,- preferably of a suitable size and height to pass under the upper horizontal portion of the inverted U-shaped frame. This casing consists of a pair of side walls 77 and 78, end walls 79 and '80, and upper and lower walls 81 and 82. The upper wall 81 is provided with a transverse slot or opening 83 and adjacent to the opening 83 the wall 81 is provided with a pair of parallel dove-tailed ribs 84 on which is mounted a slidable carriage 85 the under face of which is provided with a dove-tailed groove to receive the ribs 84. Mounted on the carriage 85 is a motor 86 on the armature shaft of which is mounted a rotary circularlyformed trimming tool 87. The carriage 85 is so positioned that the armature-shaft of the motor 86 projects inwardly toward the strip of material between the bearings for the idler rolls 74 and 75. Depending from the carriage 85 is a lug 88" provided with a threaded aperture to receive and intermesh with the threads on a threaded rotatable shaft 89 mounted in suitable hearings in the walls 77 and 78' of the casing 76.

Mounted on the shaft 89 is- -a gear 90. Also mounted in suitable bearings in'the walls 7-7 and 78 is a shaft 91 on which is mounteda gear 92 adapted tointermesh- I with the gear 90. Also mounted on the loosely shaft 91 is a smallergear- 93.- Below the shaft 91 is a shaft 94 similarly mounted which bears ajspur gear 95 adapted to intermesh with the gear 93. -Also mounted in suitable bearings in the members '77 and 78 is a counter-shaft 96 which bears a gear 97 adapted to inter-mesh with the gear' 95'. Also loosely mounted on the shaft' 91 is a gear 98, the hub of which is-fashioned-to constitute one member of a friction-clutch,

and splined on the shaft 91 is the companion member of the clutch 99 provided in'its'face with a peripheral grooveto receive the nogs carried by a bifurcated shifting lever 100. Adapted to intermesh with'the gear 98 and mounted on the shaft 96 is a gear 101 the hub of which is fashioned to constitute one member of a friction clutch and on the 'shaft 96 is splined a companion clutch-member 102 provided-in the periph eral face thereof with a groove to receive the nogs carried by a bifurcated clutch lever .103. Mounted onthe shaft 91 is'a worm-wheel 104 which is adapted to inter mesh with aworm 105:0n' an armature shaft 106 of anindependent motor 107 mounted on the platform 63, and arranged with the armature shaft 106 at right'angles with re spect to the shaft 91.

Secured to the upper face of the platform 63 and approximately below the-position 0ccupied by the rollers 72 and 73 is a tank 107 extending across the open upper end of which are a pair of rails 108-an'd along each side of the rail are a pairof guides 109. Adapted to move longitudinally of the tank and transversely of the line of the strip of fabric is a carriage 110 provided with'rollers 111 adapted to run on the rails 108; The carriage 110 bears an: upwardly-extendin approximately, centrallymrranged pedesta 112 on which are mounted a plurality of pins 113 on which are rotatable rollers 114 preferably formed of an insulating and wear-resisting substance such as These rollers 114 are adapted'to engage the edge of the strip of fabric D. The carriage 110 is constantly drawn toward the strip of fabric through the medium of a -,-spring.115. Secured to opposite sides of the tank 107 are a pair of plates 116 held in place through the mediumof holdfast devices 117. The members 116 bear a pivot 118 on which is mounted an inverted T-shaped circuit glass.

cl'o's'er 119 theiateral termini of which; are provided 'with contact 'fingers120 and the central upwardly-extending portion of the member-119 is flexibly connected with the carriage 110 so that as this carriage is.

shifted along the rails 108 the lower'diverging ends of the member 119 Will-be rocked so as to-low'eror raise either'of the contact fingers 120 as the'case maybe; Positioned within the tank 1 07- a're a pair of cups 121 and'122 containing-mercury; "Secured to the outer-faceof'the wall'79 of the casing 76 is a bracket 1 23 on which is mounted a solenoid 124 andon"the outer face of tlie opposite'wall"80' of the' casingis a bracket 125 which'bears a solenoid 126- Slidably'mount ed in the solenoids 124- and 126-a're arma- 1'27 ""surrounded by coiled springs 128 the normal tendencies of which arefto force thearmatur'esout-of the solenoids and to keep them in'this position until the magnetic action of the solenoids draws them inwardly. The-outerend ofthe armature 127 of the solenoid 124= is 'pivotally connected with the clutch lever' 100 and the armatureof the solenoid 126 is pivotally connected at its outer end with the clutch lever 103. The clutch lever 103 is pivotally mounted on a bracket 129 on the wall'80 of the casing 76 and the clutch lever 100 is pivotally mounted on a bracket 130 on the wall 79 of the casing. From the' mercury in the cup 121 extends a wire"131" to the solenoid 124 and from the solenoid 124 extends a wire 132 to awir' 133 to ab'atteryor other source of electrical e 'nergy- 134; F rom'the"battery thereextends a wire 135 toflthe -T-shaped circuit-breaker 11119., From the mercury-cup 122 extends a 'wi're 136'to the solenoid .126 and from thence ex-tends'a wire 137 to the wire- 133.- In *the wire 132 is -'a circuitbrea-ker-138 and in'the wire 137' is acircuitbreaker 139;. 'Mounted on the depending screw-threaded-lug 88 on the-carriage 85 are a pair of-projectmg'members 140 adapted to engage either of the circuit-breakers 138 and 139 for-operatin'g'them as will'more fully appear later. Secured preferably to the side ofthe motor 86 is an arm 141 projecting'inwa'rdly and terminating near the selvagecutting-tool87 and this arm bears near its inner end and adjacent to the cut ting-tool 87 a roller 344.

I "The operation of the device as described ieasaa through the medium of the springs 115. Experience has demonstrated that the selvage edges of the strips of commercial fabric are by no means straight, but have an undulating Conformation caused by means not necessary here to discuss, but as the irregular portions pass the rollers 114 the latter fol- 0w the irregularities of the selvage edges and shift toward or away from each other. In view of the'fact of these undulations or sinuosities of the selvage it becomes neces sary in order to accurately trim thefabric to constantly maintain the tools at the proper relative positions to accomplish the trimming operation, so that the width of the strip of fabric will be contant at all times, in so far as the same is possible. This-is accomplished in the following manner, reference being directed to Fig. 10: As the side of the strip of fabric which is engaged by the rollers 114 in this figure curves away therefrom, the carriage 110 will be drawn to the right in this figure to cause the rollers to follow the edge of the selvage and in doing this the upper end of the IF-shaped circuitbreaker 119 is rocked to the right, causing the contact finger 120 to dip in the mercury in the cup 122 which closes an electrical circuit through the solenoid 126 by means of the wiring just described which causes the solenoid to draw the armature 127 inwardly, thereby shifting the lever 103 throwing the clutch member 102 into engagement with the clutch member on the hub of the gear 101 which, as" before mentioned, isloose on the shaft 96 but intermeshes with the gear 98 on the shaft 91. The resulting revolution of the shaft 96 is transmitted to the gear 97 which in turn rotates the gears 95, 93, 92, and the. gear 90, which is mounted on the shaft 89 thereby rotating the same causing the threaded lug-88 on the carriage 85 bearing the motor 86 to shift its position to follow the movement of the rollers 114. On the contrary, if the carriage 110 is forced to the left in Fig. 10 the contact finger 120 dips in the mercury in the cup 121 closing the circuit through the solenoid 124 thereby shifting the lever 100 which throws the clutch member 99 into engagement with the clutch member on the gear 98 causing a revolution of the shaft 91 which rotates the gear 92 which intermeshes with the gear 90 on the shaft 89, but in a reverse direction of rotation, causing the motor andcutting tool to move in the opposite direction. The circuit breakers 138 and139 are secured in proper position to be encountered and operated by the projecting members 140 on the threaded lug 88 when the carriage 85 and motor 86 have moved in either direction farther than safety dictates. thereby opening the respective circuit and preventing a further shifting movement of the carriage 85 until the carriage 85 has been moved to its operative position to permit the respective circuit breaker to close to reestablish the circult through the appropriate solenoid.

Secured either to the motor carriage 85 or the motor 86 is an inwardly-projecting arm 143 terminating near the cutting-tool 87. The inner end of the arm 141 is provided with an idler roll 144, the object and function. of which is to divert the trimmed selvage from the advancing strip of material from which the selvage has been trimmed.

If desired, the faces of the selvage cutter frame may be provided at their ends with idler rollers 147 and 148 which serve as guides for the strip of fabric D in its passage to and from the selvage trimmer. Afterthe selvage edges of the strip of fabric have been trimmed, the strip of fabric is carried to the skimcoating machine, denominated generally by the reference letter K, which, to all intents and purposes, is an ordinary calendar comprising upright housings 143 in which are suitably mounted a se ries of three rollers 144, 145 and 146 and a massof rubber 147 suitable for skim coating is placed between the rollers 144 and 145 and is passed in a thin film over the fabric D which passes between the roller 145 and the roller 146 below. This application of a skim coat of rubber is necessary to thoroughly prepare the fabric for use in the arts and after passing through the skim coating machine the strip of fabric is carried to a reel L on which it is spooled up.

I claim 1. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in placing a constantly-moving continuous strip of fabric under tension, coating one side of the fabric with a plastic covering; subjecting said fabric after the first coating to the action of a tension device; coating the opposite side of said fabric; then changing the temperature of the coated fabric; then trimming the selvage from said strip while under tension;

then imposing a skim coating of plastic material on one face of the coated fabric; then spooling up the fabric.

2. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in coating both sides of a constantly-moving continuous strip of fabric with plastic material, regulating the tension on the fabric between the coating operations, reducing the tempera-- ture of the coated fabric, and applying a skim coat to the tensioned and cooled coated fabric.

3. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in imposing a preliminary and controlled tension. to a constant-ly-moving continuous strip of fabric, alternately coating the two faces thereof with plastic material, controlling the tension on the fabric between the'two coating operations, reducing the temperature of the coated fabric, and skim-coating one face of the coated fabric after the cooling operation.

4. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in imposing a preliminary and controlled tension to a constantly-moving continuous strip of fabric alternately coating the two faces thereof with plastic material, controlling the tension on the fabric between the two coating operations, reducing the temperature of the coated fabric, trimming the selvage edges therefrom, and skim-coating one face of the covered fabric after the cooling operation.

5. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in imposing a preduring the coating of the other side, reduc-- ing the temperature of the coated fabric and finally skim-coating one face of the coated fabric.

7 That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in coating one side of a constantly-moving strip of fabric with a plastic material, imposing tension thereon, and afterward coating the opposite ,side thereof with a plastic material, then covering one of the coated faces with a skim coating'of plastic material.

8. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in coating one side of a constantly-moving strip of fabric wi th a plastic material, imposing tension on said fabric, then coating the opposite side of said fabric with a plastic covering, reducing the temperature of the coated fabric, then trimming the selvage edges therefrom, then covering one face of the cooled fabric with a skim coating of plastic material.

9. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in placing the fabric under a preliminary tension, then coating one side of a constantly-moving strip of fabric with a plastic material, imposing tension thereon, and afterward coating the 0pposite side thereof with a plastic material,-

then covering one of the coated faces with a skim coating of plastic material.

10. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in placing the fabric under a preliminary tension, then coating one side of a constantly moving strip of fabric with a plastic material, imposing tension thereon, and afterward coating the opposite side thereof with a plastic material, then cooling said coated fabric, then imposing a skim coating of plastic material on one of the coated faces thereof.

11.- That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in coating one side of a constantly-moving strip of fabric with a plastic material, imposing tension on the fabric, coating the opposite side of said strip with a coating of plastic material, then imposing tension on the coated strip, then imposing a skim-coating on one face of the coated fabric.

12. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in coating one side of a constantly-moving continuous strip of fabric with a plastic material, imposing tension on said strip, coating the opposite side of said strip, cooling said strip, then imposing tension thereon, and finally skimcoating one of the sides thereof.

13. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in coating one side of a constantly-moving continuous strip of fabric with a plastic material, imposing tension on said strip, coating the opposite side of said strip, cooling said strip, and finally skim-coating one of the sides thereof.

14. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in imposin a preliminary tension on a constantly-moving continuous strip of fabric, coating one side thereof with plastic material, tensioning said strip, coating the opposite side of said strip with a coating of plastic material, then imposing tension on the coated strip, then imposing a skim coating on one face of the coated fabric.

15. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in imposing a preliminary'tension on a constantly-moving continuous strip of fabric, coating one side thereof with plastic material, tensioning said strip, then coating the opposite side of said strip, cooling said strip, then imposing tension thereon and finally skim-coating one of the sides thereof.

16. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in coating both sides of a constantly-moving continuous strip of fabric, imposing tension on said fabric, cooling the same, imposing tension after the cooling operation, then skim-coating one surface thereof.

17. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in coating both sides of a constantlymoving continuous strip of fabric, imposing tension on the fabric and then skim-coating one of the coated faces thereof.

18. That improvement in methods for preliminary tension to the fabric, then coat- 15 sides of a constantly-moving continuous strip of fabric, then skim-coating one of the coated sides.

21. That improvement in methods for coating fabric which consists in coating both sides of a constantly moving continuous 20 strip of fabric, then cooling the coated strip of fabric, then skim coating one of the coated faces thereof.

. ,In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand in presence of two subscribing Wit- 25 nesses.

FRANK A. SEIBERLING. Witnesses:

HARRY S. QUERE,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3993805 *May 17, 1974Nov 23, 1976Concorde Fibers Inc.Method of applying liquid finish composition to filaments
US4238530 *Jul 24, 1979Dec 9, 1980Dayco CorporationMethod for producing stress-relieved fabric
Classifications
U.S. Classification427/176, 427/289, 427/398.2, 427/209, 427/402, 425/DIG.235, 427/177
Cooperative ClassificationD06M15/423, B29D29/00, Y10S425/235