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Publication numberUS1134537 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 6, 1915
Filing dateFeb 4, 1914
Priority dateFeb 4, 1914
Publication numberUS 1134537 A, US 1134537A, US-A-1134537, US1134537 A, US1134537A
InventorsBenjamin F Hutches Jr
Original AssigneeBenjamin F Hutches Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-starter for explosive-engines.
US 1134537 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

thereby, a pump operated by said solenoid, means for supplying a fuel to said pump, and means for simultaneously actuating said spark plug and solenoid.

4. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug, a solenoid forming part thereof, a fuel supply pump operated by the solenoid, and means for conducting the fuel from said pump toward the spark gap of said spark plug.

5. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug having a fuel duct, a solenoid secured to said plug and having a bore that communicates with said duct, and a piston reciprocatable in said bore and operated by the solenoid.

6. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug having a fuel duct, a pump carried by said plug and adapted to feed the fuel through said duct, and a baflle blade on the spark plug for directing the fuel discharged from said duct toward the spark gap of said plug.

7. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug having a fuel duct, a pump carried by said plug and adapted to feed the fuel through the duct, a rotary shaft, and means controlled by said shaft for simultaneously operating the spark plug and pump.

8. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug having a socketed stud and a duct communicating with the stud-socket, a perforated nipple fitted in said socket, a solenoid secured to the nipple, and a pump piston operated by said solenoid.

9. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug having a socketed [stud anda duct communicating with the stud-socket, a perforated nipple fitted in said socket, a solenoid having a central bore 'and secured to the nipple, a spring-influenced piston reciprocatable within said bore and operated by said solenoid, and a fuel supply duct opening into said bore.

10. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug having a socketed stud and a duct communicating with the stud-socket, a perforated nipple fitted into said socket and having a seat, a springinfluenced valve adapted to engage said seat, a solenoid secured to the nipple and having a bore, a spring-influenced piston reciprocatable in said bore and operated by said solenoid, and a fuel supply duct opening into said bore.

11. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug having a socketed stud and a duct ,communicating with the stud-socket, a perforated nipple fitted into said socket and having a seat, a springinfiuenced valve adapted to engage said-seat, a solenoid secured to the nipple and having a bore, a spring-influenced headed piston reciprocatable in said bore and operated by a said solenoid, means for checking the stroke trolled by said shaft for consecutively actuating the cooperating spark plugs and pumps of the several cylinders, the spark plug and pump of each cylinder being simultaneously actuated.

13. A self-starter for explosive engines having a plurality of cylinders, a spark plug and a fuel su ply device for each cylinder, a timing sha t, a first set of substantially quadrantal contacts on said shaft for controlling the spark plugs, and a second set of substantially quadrantal contacts for controlling the fuel supply devices.

14. A self-starter for explosive engines having a plurality of cylinders, a spark plug and a fuel supply device for each cylinder, a timing shaft, and a plurality of substantially quadrantal contacts on said shaftfor. controlling the spark plugs and fuel supply devices.

15. A selfstarter for explosive engines having a plurality of cylinders, a spark plug and a fuel supply device for each cylinder, a timing shaft, a first set of comparatively short contacts on said shaft for controlling the spark plugs duringthe normal run of the engine, and a second set of comparatively long contacts likewise on said shaft for controlling the spark plugs during.

starting.

16. A self-starter for explosive engines having a plurality of cylinders, a spark plug and a .fuel supply device for each cylinder, atiming shaft, a first set of comparatively short contacts on said shaft for controlling the spark plugs during the normal run of the engine, a second set of comparatively long contacts likewise on said shaft for controlling the spark plugs during starting, and a third set of comparatively long contacts also on the shaft for controlling the fuel supply devices.

17. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug, an electromagnetic device, a piston operated thereby, a chamher in which said piston is adapted to reciprocate, means for supplying a fuel to said 'bodying my invention,

BENJAMIN F. HUTCHES, JB., OF ALLENDALE, NEW JERSEY.

SELF-STARTER FOB EXPLOSIVE-ENGINES.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Apr. 6, 1915.

Application filed February 4, 1914. Serial No. 816,439.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, BENJAMIN F. HU'roHns, J r., a citizen of the United States, and residing at Allendale, county of Bergen, andState of New Jersey, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Self- Starters for Explosive-Engines, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to a self-starting device for explosive engines, more particularly adapted for engines used in driving automobiles, motor boats, flyin machines, etc. By my invention the 0 jectionable cranking of the machine is obviated and the employment of electric and other starting motors is dispensed with, so that the fitting of the self-starter to the engine is greatly simplified. Briefly stated my device comprises novel means controlled by the timer shaft for automatically supplying to that engine cylinder, the piston of which occupies the power stroke position, an auxiliary charge of fuel, and for simultaneously forming a spark to ignite said charge.

The'invention also comprises other novel features as brought out in the appended specification and claims.

In the accompanying drawing: Figure 1 is an axial section t rough a spark plug cm- Fig. 2 a plan thereof with the fuel reservoiromitted, Fig. 3 a wiring diagram, and Fig. 4 a cross section of the timing shaft on line 4-4, Fig. 3.

My novel self-starter is composed essentially of a spark-pluggA and of an automatic fuel supply device The spark plug A comprises a metallic cup 10 tapped at a convenient place into the cylinder 11 of the explosive engine in the usual manner, and is provided with the ground electrode 12. The other electrode 13 is inclosed within an insulating stem 14 that is fitted into cup 10 and is firmly clamped in position by a threaded bushing 15. Cup 10 is rovided with a lateral extension or stud 16 aving a threaded socket into which is tapped a nipple 17. The latter-is furnished with a contracted duct 18, an outer coniform seat 19 and an inner coniform seat 20 that opens into an enlarged bore 21. Seat 20 is normally engaged by "a coniform valve 22, that is influenced by a spring 23. Bore 21 cominunicateswith an angular duct 24 of cup 10, said duct opening into the engine cylinder in proximity to a baffle plate 25 carried by said cup, and directing the fuel which is noid 27 is reciprocably mounted acylindrical pump piston or armature 30 made of magnetizable material and provided with an outer disk or head 31 the outward play of which is checked by a suitable stop 32. Between seat 19 and the coniform end 33 of piston 30 is interposed a spring 84 that tends to move the iston into its outermost position. Direct y back of piston 30 when in said outermost position (Fig. 1), there opens into bore 29 a fuel supply duct 35 that receives its charge from a suitable reservoir 36.

Normally the space between nipple 17 and piston 30 is filled with liquid fuel, an accidental discharge thereof into the engine cylinder being prevented by valve 22. When- .ever solenoid 27 is energized, piston 30 is moved toward nipple 17 thereby overcoming 1 the tension of s ring 23-and discharging the fuel contents 0 bore 21 throu h duct 24 into the engine cylinder, the bafliie plate 25 directing the jet of'fuel emanating from said duct toward spark gap 26.

The above described device may be applied to the engine cylinders in various manners, Fig. 3 showing each cylinder provided with such a device in lieu of the common spark plugs hitherto generally used, but it is to be expressly understood that my invention is not restricted to said particular show- Ti; may here be stated that the usual contacts of the timer are but relatively short, and are placed in a certain position relativel to the position of the cooperating cran of the engine shaft, so as to produce the spark at the proper moment when ignition should take place. With my improved self-starting device, a charge of the cylinder with the combustible" fuel and an ignition of such charge should be effected in any position power stroke. For this reason the timing shaft is provided with an additional set of comparatively long timing contacts that areplaced in circuit with the spark plugs, whenever of the piston while on its In Fig. 3, the numeral 37 indicates a timing shaft which is made of insulating material and is driven from the engine shaft (not shown) in the usual manner. The insulated electrode 13 of the spark plug of each engine cylinder 1, II, III, IV, is connected to the respective normally 'usedcontacts T H H1 IV of the timer shaft 37 by wires 38 38 38 38 and coiiperating contact members. All of the contacts I 11 HP, IV are connected to a common conductor 39, the exposed end of which is engaged by a contact 40. The latter is, by wire 41, con nected to a magneto 42 which is in turn by wires 43, 44 connected to the engine frame, a switch 45 being interpolated in wire 43. Wire 41 is, by branch 46 connected to the contact 47 of a switch 48 that is, by wire 49, connected to the secondary winding 50 of an induction coil 51, said secondary winding being in turn, by wire 52 connected to wire 44. The primary winding 53 of coil 51 is, by wire 54, connected to wire 52 and, by wire 55, to a battery 56. The latter is in turn, by wire 57, connected to a pair of twin switch levers 58, 59 that are adapted to either engage contacts 60, 61 or contacts 61, 62, the latter being a dead contact.

The second contact 63 of switch 48 is, by wire 64, connected to a contact 65 that engages a slip ring 66 mounted on shaft 37. Slip ring 66 is, by conductor 67 connected to four contacts I, II, III, TV", which are of substantially qu'adrantal shape as illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4.. These contacts are adapted to engage suitable contact members of wires 68 68 68 ,68 that are relatively connected to wires 38 38 38 38".

Contact 60 is, by wire 69 and a contact member 69 connected to a sli ring 70 of shaft 37 that is, by conductor 71 connected to contacts 1', I-ll', HI, IV corresponding in all respects to contacts T", II", III, IV. The former contacts are adapted to be engaged by correspondin contact members of wires 72 72 72 2, each wire leading to one end of the winding of the corresponding solenoid 27, the other end of which is grounded.

If my self-starter is to be put into. opera tion, the various switches are so set as to occupy the position shown in Fig. 3, in which case conductor 39 is cut 06 magneto 42 and induction coil 51, so that contacts I, II, III, IV are rendered inoperative. If now contact I happens to be in conductive connection with its wire 68 a sparking circuit is established which is induced by a primary circuit the current of which flows from battery 56 through wire 57, switch lever 59, contact 61, wires 73, 52, 54', primary winding 53 and wire 55 back to battery 56. lln this way, a current is induced in winding 50 that flows through wire 49, switch lever 48, contact 63, wire64, contact 65, slip ring winding 50 66, conductor 67, contact I, wires 68 38 electrode 13 of the'spark gap pertaining to cylinder T, spark gap 26, grounded electrode 12, and wires 44, 52 back to winding 50.

'While in this way a spark is produced in cylinder I, a quantity of fuel is simultaneously introduced into said cylinder in the following manner As contacts ll and I are similarly disposed, contact I is now in conductive connection with wire 72 whereby a circuit is established the current of which flows from battery 56 through wire 57, switch lever 58, contact 60, wire 69', slip ring 70, conductor 71, contact 1', wire 72 solenoid 27 of cylinder ll, wires 44,332, 54, winding 53 and wire 55 back to battery 56. In this way, solenoid 27 of cylinder I becomes energized to attract its armature 30 and thus eject the fuel entrapped between nipple 17 and said armature, through duct 24 into the engine cylinder. As simultaneously with this fuel discharge, a spark is formed in the manner above described, ignition will take place so that the engine is started, the succeeding similar ignitions 1n the other cylinders keeping the engine in motion. After the engine has thus been properly started, switches 48 and 58, 59 are thrown to the left (Fig. 3) thereby interrupting the current supply to slip rings 66, 70. At the same time, the regular sparking circuit is established, the current being supplied from secondary and normal contacts I, H, III, IV to the spark plugs, the primary winding 53 being supplied with current from battery 56 through wire 57, switch lever 58, contact 61, wires 73, 52, 54 and wire 55. In case of a break down of battery 56, magneto'42 may be switch 45 and opening switches 48 and 5s, 59. a

It will be seen that by my invention novel and effective means are provided for starting a combustible engine without having to resort to a cranking or other objectionable operation of the engine shaft.

I claim:

1. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug, a solenoid, a piston operated thereby, means for supplying a fuel to said piston, a rotary shaft, and starting contacts on said shaft for operating the spark plug and energizing the solenoid.

2. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug, a solenoid, a piston operated thereby, means for supplying a fuel to said piston, a rotary shaft, starting contacts on said shaft for operating the spark plug, and for energizing the solenoid, thereby actuating the piston, and means for conducting the fuel discharge by the piston toward the spark gap of said plug.

3. A selfrstarter for explosive engines. comprising a spark plug, a solenoid carried used by closing thereby, a pump operated by said solenoid, means for supplying a fuel to said pump, and means for simultaneously actuating said spark plug and solenoid.

4. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug, a solenoid forming part thereof, a fuel supply pump operated by the solenoid, and means for conducting the fuel from said pump toward the spark gap of said spark plug.

5. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug having a fuel duct, a solenoid secured to said plug and having a bore that communicates with said duct, and a piston reciprocatable in said bore and operated by the solenoid.

6. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug having a fuel duct, a pump carried by said plug and adapted to feed the fuel through said duct, and a battle blade on the spark plug for directing the fuel discharged from said duct toward the spark gap of said plug.

7. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug having a fuel duct, a pump carried by said plug and adapted to feed the fuel through the duct, a rotary shaft, and means controlled by said shaft for simultaneously operating the spark plug and pump.

8. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug having a socketed stud and a duct communicating with the stud-socket, a perforated nipple fitted in said socket, a solenoid secured to the nipple, and a pump piston operated by said solenoid.

9. A self-starter for" explosive engines, comprising a spark plug having a socketed .stud and a duct communicating with the stud-socket, a perforated nipple fitted in said socket, a solenoid having a central bore 'and secured to the nipple, a spring-influenced piston reciprocatable Within said bore and operated by said solenoid, and a fuel supply duct opening into said bore.

10. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug having a socketed stud and a duct communicating with the stud-socket, a perforated nipple fitted into said socket and having a seat, a springinfluenced valve adapted to engage said seat, a solenoid secured to the nipple and having a bore, a spring-influenced piston reciprocatable in said bore and operated by said solenoid, and a fuel supply duct opening into said bore.

11. A self-starter for explosive engines,

comprising a spark plug having a socketed stud and a duct communicating with the stud-socket, a perforated nipple fitted into said socket and having a seat, a springinfluenced valve adapted to engage said seat, a solenoid secured to the nipple and having a bore, a spring-influenced headed piston reciprocatable in said bore and operated by i said solenoid, means for checking the stroke plug and pump of each cylinder being simultaneously actuated. 13. A self-starter for explosive engines having a plurality of cylinders, a spark plug and a fuel su ply device for each cylinder, a timing sha t, a first set of substantially quadrantal contacts on said shaft for controlling the spark plugs, and a second set of substantially quadrantal contacts for controlling the fuel supply devices.

14. A self-starter for explosive engines having a plurality of cylinders, a spark plug and a fuel supply device for each cylinder, a timing shaft, and a plurality of substantially quadrantal contacts on said shaftfor. controlling the spark plugs and fuel supply devices.

15. A self-starter for explosive engines having a plurality of cylinders, a spark plug and a fuel supply device for each cylinder, a timing shaft, a first set of comparatively short contacts on said shaft for controlling the spark plugs duringthe normal run of the engine, and a second set of comparatively long contacts likewise on said shaft starting.

16. A self-starter for explosive engines having a plurality of cylinders, a spark plug and a .fuel supply device for each cylinder, atiming shaft, a first set of comparatively short contacts on said shaft for controlling the spark plugs during the normal run of the engine, a second set of comparatively long contacts likewise on said shaft for controlling the spark plugs during starting, and a third set of comparatively long contacts also on the shaft for controlling the fuel supply devices.

17. A self-starter for explosive engines, comprising a spark plug, an electromagnetic device, a piston operated thereby, a chamber in which said piston is adapted to reciprocate, means for supplying a fuel to said 19. A self-starter for explosive engines having a plurality of cylinders, a plurality of sets each comprising a spark plug and a fuel supply pump, one of said sets being 5 provided for each cylinder, and means for consecutively actuating said sets.

20. A self-starter .forexplosive engines having a plurality of cylinders, a plurality "of spark plugs and fuel supply pumps, one

10 of said spark plugs and pumps being provided for each cylinder, and means for con.- secutively actuating the cooperating spark plugs and pumps of the several cylinders the spark plug and pump of each cylinder being simultaneously actuatedu BENJAMIN lF. HUTCHES, JR.

Witnesses:

ARTHUR Zuiurn, FRANK v. BRIEsnN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2795214 *May 20, 1955Jun 11, 1957Shook Ii Thurston WCombined fuel injection and ignition system for internal combustion engines
US2918913 *Jun 12, 1957Dec 29, 1959Weselco LtdIgnition systems of internal combustion engines
US2950706 *Feb 3, 1956Aug 30, 1960Senckel KarlheinzMethod and device for mixing gasoline and air in cylinders of internal combustion engines
US4343272 *Mar 12, 1980Aug 10, 1982Buck Alan CDevices for supplementing conventional liquid fuels in internal combustion engines with gaseous fuel supplements
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/179.12, 313/120, 417/417, 123/90.11, 123/169.00V
Cooperative ClassificationF02M1/16