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Publication numberUS1142848 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 15, 1915
Filing dateJan 22, 1912
Priority dateJan 22, 1912
Publication numberUS 1142848 A, US 1142848A, US-A-1142848, US1142848 A, US1142848A
InventorsWilliam M Scholl
Original AssigneeWilliam M Scholl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Instep-arch support.
US 1142848 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. M. SCHOLL.

INSTEP ARCH SUPPORT.

APPLICATION FILED 11111.22, 1912.

1,142,848 PmndJm-w 15, 1915.

\\ \\x\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ v ms?" WILLIAM M. .SCHOLL, 0F CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

INSTEP-ARCH SUPPORT.

vSpecification of Letters Patent;

Patented June 15, 1915.

Application filed January 22, 1912. Serial Nol 672,597.

ports, of which the following is a specifical tion.

My invention relates to improvements in instep arch supports and their manufacture, and 1t has among 1ts general ob]ects to 'provide a light, strong, and eiiicient archsupporting structure which combines the strength of multiple-plate construction with theeasy adjustability to fit and other ladvantages of a single plate structure, and which may be made by a simple and advantageous method.

In the drawing, wherein I have shown an embodiment of my invention, Figure 1 is a plan view of the structure with the cover piece removed; Fig. 2 is a longitudinal ver.- tical section on line 2 2 of Fig. 1; and Fig. 3 is a transverse section on line 3--3 of Fig. 1, with the cover piece in'place.

In the drawing, 5 indicates in general the main plate which is preferably made of light material, such as light German silver or, preferably, an aluminum alloy having considerable stiffness and strength. The main plate in the completed article is shaped in general in conformity to the instep arch of the human foot to extend lengthwise to underlie all the bones of the instep, saidfront thereof, and transversely across the' major portion of the width of the main plate, and preferably part way up the wing extension, a recess or pocket G, with its side walls and rear walls substantially vertical. The front end wall of the recess may be formed by the upward deflection of the front extremity of the main plate, as at 7, made to conform the front end bearing surface of the plate to the plane of the shoe sole, the wall of the pocket thereby being at an oblique angle to the proximate portion of the pocket bottom.

In the recess or pocket G so formed I inlay a plate 8 of metal, of suitable thickness smoothly to ill the recess, and substantially co-extensive with the recess as shown at 8. This reinforcing plate 8 I preferably make of brass, soft steel, or other tough material having greater durability and less tendency to crystallize lthan the main plate, said reinforcing plate covering the entire longitudinal area of the main plate, throughout which the strains of use tend to bend the plate on transverse lines, providing sufficient reinforcement to prevent breakage of the plate and enabling the use of lighter materialthan might otherwise be employed in the structure of the main plate.

In the construction of the plate structure, the main plate is preferably formed while generally flat to provide the recess 6 and the reinforcing plate is seated therein, and attached thereto as by riveting or brazing, the two plates then being jointly formed up to the desired ultimate curvature, in order that the main and reinforcing plates may truly conform to each other and contact throughout substantially the entire extent of the reinforcing plate. This, of course, is of-es pecial advantage in cases where the reinforcing plate extends up the wing of the main plate. The outer edges of the main plate beyond the area of the recess or pocket portion may be depressed as indicatedat 11, Fig. 3, to add strength to the borderportions of the structure by the rib-like configuration thereof, resulting mutually from tlu.`

depression 11 and the walls of the recess G,

and at the same time to add to the comfort of the structure by sloping its edges gradually toward theunderlying shoe.

To give added ease to the structure the wing portion of the plate intended to underlie the highest part of the instep arch may be slitted, as indicated at 12, Fig. 1, and the entire structure is preferably overlain with a leather cover piece 13, having its edges ap-A proximately skived. For securing the metallic parts together and locating the cover piece upon the plate, I preferably employ v rivets, some of which, as indicated at 15,

preferably extend only through the two nietallic plates, and other whereof as indicated at 16 preferably extend through both the metal plates and the cover piece,

Obviously the size of the reinforcing plate member and other features of design may be varied while securing, to a greater or less degree, the benefits of my invention, and

while I have herein described in some detail a particular embodiment of my invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that changes in the details thereof might be made without departing from the spirit of my invention and within the scope of the appended claims.

lVhat I claim is:

l. In an instep arch support, the combination ofa main plate arched lengthw'ise and otherwise shaped to conform 'to the iinderside of the human instep arch and to find bearing upon a supporting shoe at points adjacent the heel andball of the foot, said plate having formed therein a. longitudinal depressed recess or pocket crossing the center of the lengthwise arch, and a reinforcing plate, substantially coextensive with said pocket,`fitted therein, the exposed portions of said two plateslying substantially flush and mutually conforming to the under surface of the instep.

In an instep arch support, the combination of a main plate arched lengthwise and otherwise shaped to conform to the underside of the human instep arch and to find bearing upon a supporting shoe atv points adjacent the heel and ball of the foot, said plate having therein a recess or pocket extending lengthwise from a bearing point at the front end to one at the back end of said plate, vand a reinforcing plate seated in said pocket. -i v f 3. In an instep arch support, the combination of a main plate arched lengthwise and otherwise shaped to conform to the underside of the human instep arch and to find bearing upon a support shoe at points adjacent the heel and ball of the foot, said plate having formed therein a longitudinal depressed recessA or pocket crossing the center of the lengthwise arch, and of uniform depth throughout substantially its length, and a reinforcing plate substantially coextensive with the. bottom of said pocket, fitted therein and contacting with the bottom substantially throughout its extent and secured to the main plate adjacent the ends of the reinforcing plate, the upper surfaces of said two plates lying substantially flush and mu tually conforming to the lengthwise curve of the instep.

el'. In an instep arch support, a main plate arched lengthwise and curved crosswise for substantial conformity with the instep arch of the human foot and having an upcurved `wing extension at its inner side, said main plate having within its borders a pocket of substantially uniform depth extending lengthwise across the highest arch-portion and cross wise up the side-wing of said plate, and a reinforcing plate of substantially uniform thickness approximating the depth of said pocket, shaped for substantial conformity with the outlines of said pocket and secured therein, the said two plates conforming jointly to the under-surface of the foot.

5. As an article of manufacture an instep arch support comprising a main plate of relatively stiff but brittle metal, shaped to conform to the underside of the human instep arch, and to find bearing upon a supporting shoe at points adjacent the heel and the ball of the foot, and a reinforcing plate of relatively soft or less brittle metal secured to and conforming with that portion of the main plate which underlies the central part of the arch, said reinforcing plate extending longitudinall),1 throughout substantiallj1 the entire extent of the main plate which arches upward between the bearing points adjacent the heel and ball of the foot.

(3. An instep arch support comprising in combination a main plate of relatively brittle metal and a reinforcing plate of relatively tough metal, both of said plates being shaped for and conforming to the configuration of the human instep arch, so that both plates extend longitudinally between bearing points respectively located adjacent the heel and the ball of thefoot, one of said plates having a pocket therein and the other plate interitting in said pocket.

In testimony whereof I hereunto set my hand in the presence of two witnesses.

IVILLIM M. SCHOLL.

In the presence of-d llfl Inxx ALLEN, Mana' I?. ALLEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4715131 *Feb 18, 1986Dec 29, 1987Globus Fussstutzenfabrik Karl KremendahlOrthopedic supporting member, particularly orthopedic shoe inserts, and method of its manufacture
US5901468 *Apr 1, 1997May 11, 1999Whyte; Robert S.Flexible foot support insert for athletic shoe, and the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/181
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/142