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Publication numberUS1144229 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 22, 1915
Filing dateApr 19, 1913
Priority dateApr 19, 1913
Publication numberUS 1144229 A, US 1144229A, US-A-1144229, US1144229 A, US1144229A
InventorsJohn L Mueller
Original AssigneeJohn L Mueller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil-cloth stand.
US 1144229 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

JOHN L. MUELLER, OF ST. LGUIS, MfLSSTU'RI.`

OIL-CLOTH STAND.

693,387, filed April 26, 1912, as to subject matter, tions.

One 'of the objects of this invention is to construct a stand which will support rolls of oilcloth or like material so as to display the goods and permit easyremoval and replacement thereof.

Another object is to provide means for holding and clamping the rolls in rolled vup position while supported on the stand so as which is common to the two applicato display the pattern of'the goods, which means is so constructed and arranged as to 25 permit easy removal and replacement of the rolls and permit the same to be placed close together so as to keep the size of the stand and the space occupied thereby down to a minimum.

Further objects will appear Afrom the detail description taken'in connection with the accompanying drawing, .in which:

F igurel is -a front elevation of a stand embodying Ithis invention, Fig. 2 is a longitudinal vertical section on the line 2-2 Figs. 3 and 4, Fig. 3 is a section on.the line 3-3 Fig. 1, Fig. 4; is a section on the line l--l Fig. 1, Fig. 5 is a detail view of one of the clamps, Fig. G is a section on the line 6 Fig. 1, and Fig. 7 is an enlarged detail View of the thrust bearing.

Referring to the accompanying drawings 10 designates a support or base provided withV legs 1l. This base is provided with a boss l2 Which is Vtapered to receive. the threaded end of a hollow post 13 which extends vertically through the carrier, hereinafter tol be described, and forms a bearing therefor.

The carrier comprises an upper plate lei,

'specification of Letters Patent.

- through an aperture and a lower plate-15 connected by a. series-"i (in this case four) of rods or bars 16 which are clamped to the plates by `means of nuts 17. The plates and bars thus ormtogether a braced carrier of skeleton form. The lower plate 15 has formed therein a series 'under the plate 14 as "shown at 44e. ByA

Patented June 22, i915.

Application filed April 19, 1913. Serial E0. 762,245.

of shallow recesses sunkinto the plate, while the upper plate has corresponding apertures 19 which extend entirely therethrough.

These recesses and apertures form means forv vertically and laterally supporting the rolls 2O of oil cloth in the carrier.

The lower plate The upper end of the post has mounted thereon a bracket 22 which slips over the end of the post and is secured in position thereon vbymeans of a set screw 23. This bracket 22 has a lug 2li which entends 25 in the upper plate le and is threaded to washer. The upper face 27 of the bracket is machined to receive a roller thrust bear-` ing 28 of well vknown construction. By means of this construction the carrier is revolubly supported at its upper end on the upper end of the post 413.

A frame wor] a' bracket comprising collars 30 mounted' members 3l integral with the collars is secured in position about midway between the plates l-l and 15 by means of set screws 32 orin any suitable manner. A plate 33 is formed integral with the frame work land is connected to the cross members 13 by inclinedlugs 31.1- which raise the upper surface f the plate 33 slightly and the cross members 31. A series of clamps 35 are clamped on the plate 33 by means of screws 36 passing through a 'cla-inpng ring 37, through the eyes ,-38 of' the matically close to clamp the object placed' between the clamping arms 39. The rounded ends 40 are slightly separated thereby permitting the object to be clamped to be readily placed in position in theclamp.

A cover e1 has the lower edge thereofexipanded as shown at Ll2`sofas to takeover and rest on' the plate 14. This cover is retained imposition by means of clips i3 securedto the cover and adapted to be bent means of this construction the cover may ibo 15 has an aperture 21 Aformed therein which slips over the post 13.

on the bars 16, and cross above the collars 30' receive a nut 26 and a e5 'i These 'lio readily removed 'by bending out the clips 43.

A card holding is mount'edlon 'the y 7'" cover. This holding: device has 'spring' arms ends.

46 adapted to clanip' and, hold a cardv or sign 47.

'In Fig... l-the rollsl are shown in positionv in the revolulile carrier. 'The bottoms of the `'rolls -rest in the shallow'recesses 18 which 0vertically sustain` the'lower ends of the rolls and prevent lateral displacement. The upper ends of the rolls extend through the `recesses or apertures'19 in the upper plate, and these apertures sustain the rolls at their upper Rolls of oilcloth are.- generally shipped with the pattern turned in. It is desirable however, that the pattern be shown when the rolls are displayed. To obtain this result the oilcl'oth is unrolledv a foot or two, the end turned overandrolled up againso the roll is no w placed in the stand 'the oil-.

cloth will be held iii position.A

tanceitoclear the' lower end from the recess 13; this lower en'd is then moved outwardly so asto cause .it to clear the lower plate 15,"

andthe rollis then dropped to cause theI upper end to disengage from the upper plate. v

The yielding construction of the'- spring f clamps 'is such as to permit the roll to be readily moved' out as it is removed from* 5 roll can thus be removed or replaced with one hand leaving the other hand free. Table oilcloth is generally furnished in rolls about four feet long. Now if such rolls are supported at their upper and lower ends only, (which is desirable as it displays the full length of therolls) the oilcloth is Pliable to unroll and bulge outatthe center of the roll. By the provision of these clamps this bulginglout at the center is prevented so that the rolls will' always be held neatly inl rolled up position. In View of the factthat the clamps face and open and close circumferentially, not lonly can the rolls be readily removedaigd replaced, but this construction also permits these rolls to be placed close together TIT the stand, thereby keeping the size of the stand down to a minimum. It

' Rolls or' oil cloth as made by will be noted that the carrier is suspended at its upper end on the post 13; this construction not onlyrenders the carrier stable but permits it to be easily revolved.

diierent manufacturers, or even by the same manufacturer, vary in length from a-standard. Thus, oil cloth sold as inches wide, may be 59-inches-wide when made by one manufacturerland 61 inches when made by another manufacturer. This will cause the ends of thevr'ollsto project diderent distances through the top plate, thus present-- i l i i l i am; ing an unattractive appearance. However,

by providing a cover L11 of a depth o three inches or more, the tops of the rolls are covered, thereby presenting a neat a pear-l ance, at the same time permitting su cient.

free upward movement ofthe rolls t0 per-v mit removal thereof from the stand without removing the cover.,

It is obvious that various changes may be made in the details of construction without,

stand comprising, a` revo- -lilile carrier, means on said carrier {engaging therolls for axially and laterally sup- `To remove arollit is raised a short disporting one end of the rolls, means on said carrier engaging the rolls for laterallyvsup-, I

porting the other ends of the rolls, and a tially opening and closing clamps on said carrier for detachably embracingthe rolls intermediate their ends, constructed to hold vseries of radially facing and c ircumferenthe oi-lcloth inrolled up position while supl ported in tlie'stand, whereby a roll may be moved by, a combined axial 'and radial movement out of jdngagementwith said supporting and holding means to remove the same from said carrier.

2. An oilcloth stand comprisingupper and lowerl plates, Vmeans connecting said plates to form a braced revoluble carrier, a base for revolubly supportingsa-id carrier, said lower plate having a plurality of recesses constructed toreceive and vertil cally and laterally 4support the .lower ends of the rolls, and the upper plate having a plurality of apertures extending therethrough constructed to receive and laterally ios y support the upperends of the rolls, and

radially facing and circumferentially -opening and closing clampsadapted to embrace and clamp the rolls intermediate their ends,

whereby `said rolls are, supported at their and dropping it to disengage its from its apertures. f

3. An oilcloth stand'comprising, a revo- I upper and lower ends, and whereby a roll' may be removed by raising the roll outfof its recess, swinging its lower'end radially upper endl iis ba'se and having recesses therein constructed to receive and support the upper ends of the Tous, therous projecting through'the upper p1ate,a .cover or hood for the upper ends of the rolls mounted upon and supported by said plate, and clips secured to said cover and extending underneath said plate to'hold said cover in position.

4'. An olcloth stand comprising a supfy port, a pair of upper and lower plates tobracket mounted on and secured to said' rods, and positioned intermediate said plates, a series of radially facing clamps mounted on said bracket and adapted to embrace and clamp the rolls intermediate their ends, and means for supporting. said carrier vertically onvsaid support.

5, An oilcloth stand comprising a support, a pair of upper and lower plates together with rods connecting said plates to form a braced revoluble carrier, said plates eing adapted to support the rolls vertically at their upper and lower ends,'a bracket,

mounted on and secured to said rods, a series of radially facing clamps mounted on said bracket and adapted to embrace and clamp the rolls intermediate their ends, a ring Vfor securing said clamps in position on said bracket, and means for supporting said carrier vertically on said support. y

G. An oileloth 4stand comprising, a support, a pair of upper and lower plates together with means connecting said plates to form a braced revoluble carrier, saidl, plates being adapted to support the rolls vertically at their-upper and lower ends, a bracket revoluble with said carrier and positioned thereon intermediate said plates, a series of radially facing clamps mounted on said bracket and adapted to embrace the rolls, and a post mounted on said support and eX- tending through said carrier and vertically loosely through said lower plate and loosely through said bracket, and engaging said upper plate, adapted to suspend said carrier on said support.

7. An oil cloth stand. comprising upper and lower plates, means connecting said plates to form a braced revoluble carrier, a base for vertically supporting said carrier for rotary movement thereon, said lower plate being constructed to support the lower ends of said rolls, and said upper plate havin g a plurality of apertures extending therethrough constructed to receive and support the upper ends ot' the rolls, and a cover for the upper ends ot' the rolls projecting through said upper plate, whereby said rolls are supported at their upper and lower ends, and whereby a roll may be removed, With said cover in position, by raising the roll, swinging its lower end radially, and dropping it to disengage its upper end from the aperture in the upperv plate.

In testimony whereof l affix my signature in the presence of these two witnesses.

I JOHN L. MUELLER.

lVitnesses z J. H. BRUNINGA, O. J. Guonbn, Jr.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3025918 *Jan 7, 1954Mar 20, 1962Joy Mfg CoPipe storage and handling device
US3096495 *Nov 7, 1960Jul 2, 1963Stoddart Aircraft Radio Co IncCoaxial element turret
US3298531 *Apr 11, 1966Jan 17, 1967Carl WilckeDevices for storing tools and the like
US3298532 *Apr 11, 1966Jan 17, 1967Carl WilckeDevice for storing articles
US7559428 *Jun 24, 2005Jul 14, 2009Rick Edwin MatzickGun rack
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/70, 211/44
Cooperative ClassificationA47F5/02