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Publication numberUS1145632 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1915
Filing dateMay 3, 1913
Priority dateMay 3, 1913
Publication numberUS 1145632 A, US 1145632A, US-A-1145632, US1145632 A, US1145632A
InventorsWilliam C Ude
Original AssigneeWilliam C Ude
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for controlling telephone-circuits.
US 1145632 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. C. UDE. MEANS FOR CONTROLLING TELEPHONE CIRCUITS,

APPLICATION man MAY 3. m3.

hmfi fimw Patented July 6, 1915.

3 SHEETS-SHEET I- COLUMBIA PLANoaRAPH co.,\vAsmNG'r0N. D c,

w; c. UDE. MEANS FOR CONTROLLING TELEPHONE CIRCUET S.

APPLICATION FILED MAY 3, 1913- L mmfimm Patented July 6, 1915.

a SHEETS-SHEET 2.

COLUMBIA PLANOGRAPH co.. WASHINGTON. n. c

W. C. UDE

MEANS FOR CONTROLLING TELEPHONE CIRCUITS.

APPLICATION FILED MAY 3. 1913.

Patented July 6, 1915.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

COLUMBIA PLANOGRAI'II conwmsuma'n-x, Iv k WILLIAM C. UDE, OF WEST HAVEN, CONNECTICUT.

MEANS FOR CONTROLLING TELEIEHONE-CIRGUITS.

Application filed May 3, 1913.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I. WILLIAM C. UDE, a citizen of the United States. residing at Nest Haven, in the county of New Haven and State of Connecticut, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Means for Controlling Telephone-Circuits; and I do hereby declare the following, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings and the characters or" reference marked there on. to be a full, clear. and exact description of the same. and which said drawings constitute part of this application,and represent, 1n

Figure 1 a top or plan view of a telephone fixture constructed in accordance with my invention. Fig. 2 a sectional view of a tele phone fixture, and a diagrammatic view of circuits connected therewith illustrating one form and method of opening the circuit from a central or sub-station, the circuits being shown as open. Fig. 3 a similar vieW of a telephone fixture showing the circuits in the closed position. Fig. 4C a sectional view oi a telephone fixture with diagram of circuits illustrating another method of controlling the circuit opening mechanism. Fig. 5 is a similar view showing a double-coil magnet. Fig. 6 a sectional diagrammatic view of the switch-hook type of telephone fixtures. Fig. 7 a sectional view of the base portion of a push-button type of fixture.

This invention relates to an improvement in means for controlling telephone circuits having in view in particular to place the circuits of telephones to their normal or ringing positions from a central or sub-station when they have been left closed by the subscriber.

In part. this invention is an improvement on the telephone fixture for which Letters Patent of the United States No. 1,050,404 were granted to me January 14. 1913. In the device shown in this patent the switch arm was adapted to be locked in its closed position. and unless the subscriber moved the switch armso as to release the latch mechanism the circuit would be left closed, and so that the operator at the central or sub-station could not call the subscriber.

One object of this invention is to provide a telephone fixture as shown in this patent with means whereby the operator at the central or sub-station may trip the latch so as to open the circuit.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented July e, iais.

Serial No. 765,188.

Another object of this invention is to provide telephone fixtures having the usual recelver hook switch with means whereby the operator at the central or sub-station may open the circuit even if the subscriber has failed to return the receiver to the hook and thereby open the circuit.

My invention is also applicable to telephone fixtures provided with push button switches. In other words, my invention relates broadly to a method of, and means for placing the circuits of telephones to their normal or ringing position from a central or sub-station when they have been left closed by the subscriber; and the invention consists in the methods and constructions hereinafter described and particularly recited in the claims.

In Figs. 1 2 and 3 of the drawings, I have shown my present invention as applied to a telephone fixture like that shown and described in my patent above referred to, which comprises a casing 2 supporting the usual transmitter 3 the casing inclosing the usual contact-spring plate 4: which is engaged by a pin 5 at the inner end of a switch arm 6 which is pivoted in the casing. To the outer end of the arm 6 is pivoted a receiverarm 7 supporting at its outer end a receiver 8 which is connected in the usual manner with the mechanism in the casing. In this construction the circuit may be closed by the subscriber pressing the head against the receiver 8 which, moving that receiver outward, causes the pin 5 carried by the end 9 oi the arm- 6 to crowd the spring plate 4: into contact with the plates 10 and 11 so as to close the circuit. Provision is also made for holding the switch arm in the circuit closing position, such mechanism including a latch 12 having an operating-handle 13 which projects through a slot 14 in the casing, the latch 12 engaging with the end 9 of the switch arm 6 when the switch is closed." If the switch is held in the circuit closing position by the latch 12, the subscriber should slightly move the switch arm away from the transmitter so as to release the latch which will spring back into normal position under the action of the spring 22. If, however, the subscriber omitted to trip the latch 12 or move the switch arm 6 sulficient to allow the latch to spring back so as to open the circuit, the operator at the central or sub-station could not call the subscriber through the usual bell signal as the bells are virtually out out when the circuits are in their closed or'talking position. To provide for tripping this latch therefrom, from a central or sub-station, I employ an electro-magnet 15, the armature 16 of which is connected with an L-shaped lever 17 provided at its outer end with a notch 18 adapted toengage with a lug 19 on the latch 12. The lever is also provided with an outwardly projecting finger 20 in the path of a tripping pin 21 also mounted in the inner end 9 of the arm 6. A spring 22 will be connected with the latch 12 for normally retiring it, and a spring 23 will be connected with an L-shaped lever 17 and normally tending to withdraw the armature 16 from the magnet 15 and throw the outer end of the lever into operative engagement with the latch.

In case the subscriber locks the switch arm in the closed position, and as shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings, the latch 12 is held in its locking position by the engagement of the shoulder 18 with the lug 19, and in this position the latch locks the switch arm 6 in the open position. If, now, the operator at central or a sub-station wishes to again call or signal the subscriber, it will first be necessary to open the talking circuit. For this purpose the operator in creases the current above the talking current by switching into the main lines 24 and 25 a greater current than is required for the talking circuit. This greater cur rent will increase the energy through the magnet 15, moving the armature 16 so as to move the shoulder 18 out of contact with the lug 19 thereby tripping the latch 12 and allowing the switch arm 6 to return to its normal or open position. In the system just described, the usual induction coil 26 is employed.

In Fig. 4 of the drawings, I have shown another method and means for controlling the tripping mechanism. In this case the retardation or induction coil 61 actuates the armature 27 closing the circuit, and places the magnet across the lines, thus preventing the greater current from passing through the transmitter. It is obvious that the magnetism in the retardation or induction coil 61 may actuate directly upon the L-shaped lever for tripping the latch mechanism.

In'Fig. 5 of the drawings a similar arrangement of latch releasing mechanism is shown except that instead of a single-wound magnet 15 I employ a magnet of two windings, the part 28 corresponding practically to the'magnet 15' for actuating the L-shaped lever, and the part 29 for operating the armature and contact 30, the part 29 being placedin the circuit in the same way as the magnet 15 before described. When the increased current is sent through the-lines 24,

25, this increased current first acts upon the part 29 placing the portion 28 across the line, thus providing sufficient energy to actuate the L-shaped lever.

In Fig. 6 of the drawings I have shown my invention as applied to the common type of switch hook forms. The usual switch hook 31 projecting outward from the upright 32 is provided with a lug 33 adapted to engage with a spring plate 34 by which the circuit is closed when the receiver is removed and the switch hook 31 rises. Connected with the inner end of the hook through a pin-and-slot connection is a link 35 pivotally connected with a separating lever 36 which is provided at its outer end with insulated separating points 37, 38, adapted to be forced downward between the plates 34 and 39 and the plates 39 and 40. This separating lever 36 is normally held in its raised or retired position by a lever 41 forming part of an armature 42, and at its upper end provided with a shoulder 43 adapted to engage with a lug 44 on the senarating lever 36. Within the post and below the armature 42 is a magnet 45, and the energy of this magnet may be increased from the central or sub-station by increasing the current so as to move the armature 42 releasing the shoulder 43 from engagement with the lug 44 allowing the spring 46 to act to draw the separating lever downward and crowd the insulated points 37 and 38 between the plates 34, 39 and 40, and so as to open the circuit permitting the operator to again signal the subscriber even if the switch hook is up. WVhen the subscriber replaces the receiver the switch hook moves downward moving the plate 34 and opening the circuit in substantially the usual manner. At the same time the inner end of the switch arms will have raised the link 35 so as to lift the separating lever 36 to a sufficient extent for the notch 43 to again engage with the lug 44 thereby locking the separating lever out of contact with the plates 34, 39 and 40. In the ordinary use of a telephone this remains in that looked position, being brought into play in case the subscriber omits to replace the receiver.

In Fig. 7 of the drawings I have shown my invention as applied to a form of fixture in which push buttons are employed in the base or switch box. To close the circuit for talking the button 47 is pushed inward causing the plates 48, 49 and 50 to contact so as to close the circuit. The inner end of the button 47 is connected with the rocking lever 51 the opposite end of which is provided with a lug 52 adapted to be engaged by a latch 53 forming or connected with an armature 54. The upper end. of the lever 53 is provided with an inclined face 55 adapted to be moved by the inner end 56 of a push button 57 which is normally raised by a spring 58. In the usual operation the button 4:7 is pushed inward to close the talking circuit, and when the subscriber pushes the button 57 to release the latch 53 the button 4:? will be raised. If, however, the subscriber omits to move the button 57 so as to open the circuit the operator at the central or sub-station may energize a magnet arranged within the case as before described which will, move the armature 54 and so as to release the rocking-arm 51 and open the circuit. In this figure I have shown a magnet 59 of iron-clad type, and in connection with a contact-closing device 60 which also completes the magnetic circuit when the current in the main lines is increased, thus placing the magnet across the lines without increasing the current through the talking line above the danger point. It is evident without further illustration that the switch-operating magnet might be operated through one of the main lines and the ground. In all cases the armatures will be made adjustable by tension devices as indicated in Figs. 5 and 7, or by any other well known means for adjusting the tension of springs.

It will be apparent from the foregoing that various forms of magnets may be employed, and that my invention may be used in connection with various types of telephone fixtures and in circuits using either direct or alternating currents. I therefore do not wish to be understood as limiting my invention to any of the details of construction shown.

I claim 1. The combination with the normally open talking-circuit of a telephone set, of circuit-closing means located in the said talking-circuit to maintain the said circuit normally open, and means located in the said talking-circuit in position to co-act with the said circuit-closing means for the actuation thereof in opening the said talkingcircuit from the central otlice, and thus placing the telephone set in ringing condition in case the said talking-circuit is left closed by the subscriber.

2. In a telephone, in combination with the talking circuit, of a magnet actively in said circuit, switch mechanism adapted to close the talking circuit, an armature adapted to lock the switch in its closed position, said magnet adapted to have its energy increased whereby said armature is moved to release the switch.

3. In a telephone, in combination with the talking circuit, of a switch adapted to close said circuit, a magnet actively in said circuit, latch mechanism adapted to lock the switch in its closed position, an armature adapted to hold the latch in its locked position, said magnet adapted to have its energy increased whereby said armature is moved to release the latch and open the switch.

4:. In a telephone, in combination with the talking circuit including a coil in that circuit, of a switch adapted to close said circuit, latch mechanism adapted to lock the switch in its closed position, a lever adapted to hold the latch in its locked position, means operated through the coil and talking circuit when closed for tripping the latch and releasing the switch.

5. The combination with the normally open talking-circuit of a telephone set, of circuit-closing means located in the said talking-circuit to maintain the said circuit normally open, an emergency magnet located in the said talking-circuit in position to coact with the said circuit-closing means for the actuation thereof in opening the said talking-circuit from the central otfice, and thus placing the telephone set in ringing condition in case the said talking-circuit is left closed by the subscriber.

In testimony whereof, I have signed this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

WILLIAM C. UDE. Witnesses:

FREDERIO C. EARLE, MALCOLM P. NICHOLS.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. G.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2861136 *Jun 5, 1956Nov 18, 1958American Telephone & TelegraphSwitch mechanism for telephone apparatus
US3095480 *Aug 28, 1959Jun 25, 1963Popejoy Leland BTelephone party line clearing component
US3150237 *Feb 21, 1961Sep 22, 1964Baldik Frank CTelephone line clearing relay
US3471649 *Nov 30, 1966Oct 7, 1969American Telephone & TelegraphEmergency reporting telephone system for highways
US3725613 *Feb 25, 1971Apr 3, 1973Rochester Tel CorpApparatus for protecting and testing telephone network
US6980634Oct 16, 2002Dec 27, 2005James R DavisTelephone circuit controller apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification379/372, 379/425
Cooperative ClassificationH04M1/82