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Publication numberUS1146947 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 20, 1915
Filing dateJul 10, 1912
Priority dateJul 10, 1912
Publication numberUS 1146947 A, US 1146947A, US-A-1146947, US1146947 A, US1146947A
InventorsBertram Norton
Original AssigneeBertram Norton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reciprocating conveyer or screen.
US 1146947 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

B. NORTON. RECiPROCATING CONVEYER 0R SCREEN.

APPLICATlON FILED JULY 10. I912.

Patented July 20, 1915.

a sums-sum 1.

M: v. mm

B. NORTON.

RECIPROCATING CONVEYER 0R SCREEN.

APPLICATION FIL ED JULY 10. 1912.

- Patented July 20, 1915.

J 3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

B. NORTO N. RECIPROCATING CONVEYER 0R SCREEN.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 10.1912.

Patented July 20, 1915 3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

BER'IRAM NORTON, D DUDLEY, ENGLAN.D.

RECIPROGATING GON'VEYER OR Specification of Letters Patent.

SCREEN.

Pa ted July 28 3.915.,

iipplication filed July 10, 15212. Serial No. 708,593.

To all 10710112 it 1/1/11] mmrzcr'vi.

lie it known that l, lirilii'RXM Homes, 3 subject of "the King of Great Britain, residing at UflStlQllfilB, Dudley, llorccsten shire, England, have inventwl new and useful Improvements in Reciprocating Coin veycrs or Screens, of which the following is c. specification.

My invention relates to reciprocating conveyers or screens.

1 t has for its object reduction of the motive power required to cause the reciprocation.

in the following description and claims, wherever the word conveyer is used it is intended to apply equally to a screen. The reciprocating port of :1 conveyer in all known cases moves with a variable velocity, gene-rally with the highest velocity occurring it or near the center of the stroke. It is obvious that energy must be imported to a reciprocating part during the first part of the strolls, (hereinafter referred to as the acceleration period) that is, up to the point of highest velocity, and from this point onward (hereinafterreferred to as the reterdotion period) to the end of the stroke the kinetic energy of the reciprocating has to be absorbed.

My invention consists of a device for absorbing the kinetic energ of the reciprocating part during the retardation period, converting it into potential energy, and later, after reversal of direction, reconverting it into kinetic energy during the aceration period. This has the effect of rethe driving mechanism with a consequent reduction of the motive power required. In order to effect this I connect a reciprocating part to a piston or diaphragm so that the motion of the part causes such piston or diaphragm to compress a volume of air, steam, or other within it vessel during the retardation period, thus absorbing the kinetic energy of the r iprocating part and converting it into potential energy. On reversal of the stroke the pressure of the gas reacts through the piston or diaphragm on to the reciprocating par-t thus assisting the driving mechanism curing the acceleration period of the subsequent stroke. in some cases it is advantageous to supply air, steam, or gas to the cylinder or vessel from a source of supply at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure.

partl'in the drawings Figure 1 is a side elevw tion and Fig. 2 is a plan oi? a conveyor. Fig. 3 is a side elevation and Fi 2 21 plan of the compressor cylinder to a larger scale. Figs. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 show modifications.

The conveyor 11 is made in two parts {L1 a: mounted on pivoted arms 6 b and IF I)".

The parts (1 a are connected together by a,

lever c pivoted at c, and conncctci'l t0 the port oflthe end of the lover c and the part a being connected together by a link .d. The part a is connected to the piston 6 oi the cylinder 0 by means of rods fond 4-. gudgeon pin passing through the piston and extending at each end through slots 6 c in the walls of the cylin' er which is constructed as shown withon. tnfiing boxes.

Fig. shows the conv r a connected by the piston rod e to the piston c of a double acting cylinder 6. Figs. 6 shows a. similar arrangement but in ti "s case the conveyer a is connectedto the cylincer c the piston 6 being fixed. lneach. of the above arrange ments the mechanism: is shown with the recipr cotingpart in the position occupied when moving at its highest velocity, the piston being in such a. position in the cylinder that it is in equilibrium so for as the air or other pressure in the cylinder is concerned. During the later part of the stroke or retardation period in. either direction, the. air or other gas is caused to be compressed'on one side or" the 1 'ston up to the end of the stroke. On reversal of direction the conipressed gas expands and forces the piston toward the middle of the cylinder, thus assisting during the acceleration period of the ensuing stroke.

Figs. 7 and Sshow arrangements similar to .Fi 5 and 6 except that the cylinders are single acting, so that air or gas is compressed during half the forward or backward movement of the conveyer end expands during the other half of the heels ward or forward movement respectively.

In order that any leakage that rrnsy talze place past the piston or piston rod shall he automatically made good at each stroke a. port g is provided in the Wall ofthe cylinder so that when the piston is lH 'ELPQSlt'lOII farthest from one end'of the cylinder, this port offers afair way for more air-or gas to enter the cylinder as is shown in Figs.

to 8. In Fi 3 and 4 the slots? 2 serve gVS ' this purpose.

..n Figs. 9 to 1;? the cylinders are in communication with a source of air supply at greater pressure than atmospheric pressure. In Fig. 9 the conveyor a. is connected to a T lever ft capable of oscillating on a fixed fulcrum h. '2' and j are cylinders connected by pipes 11? and j to a source of pressure supply 7c. hods and j connected to the pistons in the cylinders i and j are in contact with the lower arms of lever 71. and are alternately pressed inward as the lever oscillates. In Fig. 19 a projection 21 on the conveyer is arranged between the ends of the rods i and j and act in a similar manner. In Fig. 9 the conveyor a is shown in the position occupied when moving at its highest velocity. Further movement to the left causes lever 72. to depress piston against the pressure of in cylinder 2', thus absorbing the kinetic energy of the conveyor during the retardation period. After reversal of direction of stroke the pressure of the gas acting on the piston assists in accelerating the motion of the conveyer during the acceleration period. This action ceases when the conveyer again reaches the position shown in Fig. 9. Subsequent movement toward the right which occurs during a retarding period causes the piston in the cylinder to be depressed. In Fig. 10 the action of acceleration and retardation of part a; is similar to that in Fig. 9. Fig. 11 is a side view wherein the conveyor a is connected to a lever m which oscillates about the fixed fulcrum m and is jointed to the piston rod n of a cylinder n oscillating on a. fixed pivot o 12. is a pipe connecting the cylinder to a source of pressure supply 7e. Any movement of the conveyer toward the left causes piston n in the cylinder n to be raised against the pressure of the air in the cylinder thus retarding the conveyer a. Upon reversalof stroke the pressure of the gas in the cylinde n acting upon piston assists to give motion to the conveyer during the acceleration period. Further movement to the right again raises piston. the actions of retarda-' tion and subsequent acceleration after reversal being repeated exactly as described above. Fig. 12 is a side elevation and Fig. is an end elevation wherein the conveyor (1, is connected by a link 0 to a crank pin '7) to which is also connected 2. rod 9' jointed to the piston r in the cylinder r. s is a short lever which oscillates about a fixed point s and carries at its other end the crank pin 9;. r is a pipe connecting the cylinder 'to a source of pressure supply 7c. mien the conveyor a moves to the left (during a retardation period) it constrains the crank pin 7? to move in the same direction, thus causing piston in the cylinder r to descend against the pressure in the cylinder. After reversal of direction (that is during the ensuing acceleration period) the pres sure in the cylinder acting upward through piston causes the rod g to move toward the position shown, in this manner assisting to accelerate the conveyer a.

In Figs. 9 to 13 a non-return valve may be provided between the inlet pipe and the cy.l-

inder, in such a manner that no return of gas from the cylinder can take place, such a valve is shown at --u.' Thus the inward movement of the piston would cause the pressure in the cylinder to rise above the normal. The pressure from the source of supply must be maintained in the inlet pipe so that any leakage past the piston may be made good. In cases where steam pressure is used this make-up will be necessary on account of condensation in the cylinder.

In the claims air is intended to includegas or steam.

What I claim is 1. In combination with a reciprocating conveyor, means for positively driving the same, means actuated by the conveyor for compressing air during half the movement in one direction of the conveyer and arranged so that the compressed air acts to assist the motion of the conveyor during the same half of the movement in the other direction. l

2. In combination with a reciprocating conveyer, means for positively driving the same, means for compressing air actuated by the conveyer as it moves in both directions and arranged so that the compressed-air acts to the means for compressing the air.

4. In combination with a reciprocating conveyor. means for compressing air actuated by the conveyer as it moves in both directions and arranged so that the compressed air acts to assist the motion of the conveyor, and means for supplying air at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure tothe-means for compressing the air.

5. Av reciprocating conveyor. :1. cylinder, 1 piston in the cylinder, means for connecting the conveyer to the piston, and means for supplying air at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure to the cylinder.

6. The combination of a conveyer, means for positively driving the same, pivoted arms supporting the conveyor. and means attached to the conveyor 'for compressing air during half the movement in one direction of the to assist the motion of the conveyor during conveyor and arranged to cause the com-.

metres? pressed air to assist the motion of the conyer during the same half of the movement the other direction.

'2'. The combination of a conveyer, means for positively driving the conveyer, pivoted arms supporting the conveyer and means for compressing air actuated. by the conveyer as it moves in both directions and arranged to cause the compressed air to assist the motion or" the conveyor in both directions.

8. A conveyor, means 'fonpositively driving the same, pivotedarms ,su 'iporting the; conveyer; the driving means and pivoted arms being so arranged that the conveyor reaches its highest point at the movement 'of its greatest velocity and means actuated the conveyer for compressing air during half the movement in one direction of the 9. A conveyer, means for positively driv ing the same, pivoted arms supporting the conveyer; the driving means and pivoted reaches its highest point at the moment of its greatest Velocity, means for compressing air actuated by the conveyor as it moves in both directions and so arranged that the compressed air acts to assist the motion of the conveyor in'both directions.

BERTRAM NORTON. Witnesses:

HOWARD AUGHTRO, CHAS, H. BARKER.

'arins being so arranged that the conveyer

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2458077 *Mar 5, 1945Jan 4, 1949Jacobsen Richard SConveyer
US2473193 *Nov 21, 1944Jun 14, 1949Loftus Engineering CorpReciprocating conveyer
US2630210 *Feb 28, 1948Mar 3, 1953Carrier Conveyor CorpVibratory conveyer with deformable drive coupling
US2630211 *Jan 4, 1950Mar 3, 1953Carrier Conveyor CorpShaker conveyer
US2659487 *Jan 17, 1950Nov 17, 1953Caler William RMechanical movement for screening machines
US2669344 *Sep 23, 1950Feb 16, 1954Jeffrey Mfg CoBalanced sectionalized vibratory conveyer
US2700472 *Jan 28, 1950Jan 25, 1955Carrier Conveyor CorpFoundry mold shakeout device
US2705070 *Mar 17, 1950Mar 29, 1955Carrier Conveyor CorpBalanced conveyor
US2823323 *Jun 25, 1952Feb 11, 1958Magnus Lamm AkeMagnetically actuated mechanism for article display
US2917305 *Aug 17, 1953Dec 15, 1959United Eng Foundry CoCushioning apparatus for reciprocating elements
US2940587 *Nov 25, 1957Jun 14, 1960Douglas M Mcbean IncAccumulator
US2974798 *Oct 28, 1955Mar 14, 1961Jaroslav RuzickaVibrating system
US3095747 *Jul 22, 1957Jul 2, 1963Chain Belt CoAmplitude control of resonant vibration exciter
US3645381 *Aug 12, 1969Feb 29, 1972Logemann Brothers CoVibratory conveyor
US6722492Jan 15, 2003Apr 20, 2004Dennis A. TrestainConveyor motor having bellows
US6880693Apr 8, 2004Apr 19, 2005Dennis A. TrestainConveyor motor having bellows
USRE41962Apr 30, 2007Nov 30, 2010Dennis TrestainPneumatically actuated beltless conveyor
USRE42031Apr 30, 2007Jan 18, 2011Dennis TrestainPneumatically actuated beltless conveyor
Classifications
U.S. Classification198/760, 198/768, 209/365.3, 267/75
Cooperative ClassificationB65G27/30