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Publication numberUS1147428 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 20, 1915
Filing dateApr 15, 1913
Priority dateApr 15, 1913
Publication numberUS 1147428 A, US 1147428A, US-A-1147428, US1147428 A, US1147428A
InventorsAlfred Peterson
Original AssigneeAlfred Peterson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary motor.
US 1147428 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' A. PETERSON.

ROTARY MOTOR.

APPLICATION FILED APR-15, 1913.

1,147,428, Patented J 20, 1915.

: s I 8 7- I Z a 2 A. PETERSON.

ROTARY MOTOR.

APPLICATION FILED APR. 15, 1913.

Patented July 20, 1915.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

ALFRED BETERSON, OF INDEPENDENCE, MISSOURI.

ROTARY MOTOR.

. of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to rotary motors and has for its prlmary object the production of a motor of the internal combustion type having rotary geared pistons, the fluid supply to which is regulated by a rotary type of valve;

A further object is to provide a valve construction in combination with two or more pairs of such pistons and in which the fluid charge may be supplied by the valve either alternately or simultaneously to said pairs.

Another object is to combine the valve construction with means for regulating at will the size of the valve opening.

A further object is the provision of means for maintaining the fluid charge in the valve.

under the required degree of pressure.

With these general objects in view, my invention comprises various novel and peculiar features of construction as hereinafter described and claimed; and to afford a complete'understanding of the same, reference will be made to the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1, is a vertical sectional view taken through the device along the line 1+1 of Fig. 3. Fig. 2, is aside elevation of the motor, being partly in section along the line IIII of Fig. 1. Fig. 3, is a vertical section along the line IIIIII of Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrow. Fig. 4, is a similar section through the valve portion but showing one of the valve sleeves in shifted position. Fig. 5, is a perspective view of one of the valve sleeves, and Fig. 6, is a vertical section along the line VIVI of Fig. 1.

Referring to the drawings, the base 2 of the machine supports a pair of stands 3 secured to the base by bolts 5 each of which stands carries two pairs of bearing standards 4. The stands 3 are placed side by side with the bearings in alinement so as to receive two shafts 6, designed to carry a piston 8 between each pair of standards, each pair of alined shafts having a flexible coupling Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented July 20, 1915.

Application filed April 15, 1913. Serial No. 761,153.

7 of any desired type between the stands 3.

Each piston is provided with teeth 10, the shafts being at a distance apart so that the teeth of the pistons on the same stand will intermesh as shown in Fig. 3. The standards also carry radial arms 12 for the support of the sections of the casing 14 which sections are bolted together as shown'at 16, the casing 14 corresponding to the usual cylinder casing and being for the purpose of inclosing the upper portions of each set of geared pistons whereby the teeth of the pistons and the inner walls of the casing will.

together form pockets for inclosing the ga received from the valve.

The outer surfaces of the sections have cooling ribs 18 formed thereon. The adjacent surfaces between the pistons 8 and the side walls of the casing 14 as well as the bearings for the shafts 6 are suitably packed, but the details of this packing are not gone into as the same are substantially the same as shown in Patent No. 1,026,120, issued to me May 14,1912.

Extending vertically through the middle portion of each casing 14 opposite the geared portions of the pistons is an inlet port 20.-

Into each port 20 projects a sparking plug 22 for firing gas charges at the proper intervals. Extending across from one casing 14 to the other casing and supported on their middle portions .over the ports 20 is a valve I casing 24, secured in place by bolts 26. This .casing 24 is provided with ports 21 registering with ports 20, and fitting within said casing 24 is an oscillating sleeve 28, and within the sleeve 28 is fitted closely a rotary. valve sleeve 30. Both sleeves 28 and 30 are open at one end and closed at their opposite ends, the sleeve 28 being oscillated by a sleeve 32 operating loosely upon a shaft 34, which rotates the sleeve 30. The outer end of the shaft 34 will be suitably supported in the bearing 36 which may be a standard or hanger or whatever .type of bearing may be convenient where the machine is installed. The end of the shaft carries a sprocket wheel 38, driven by va chain 40 from a sprocket wheel 42 mounted upon one of the shafts 6.

Returning to the valve sleeves, the sleeve 28 is shown in Fig. 5, as provided with two sets of openings 44 and 46, the openings 44 g mamas being in alinement with the longitudinal axis of the sleeve while the openings 46 are out of alinement. The sleeve 28 oscillates with one or the other of said sets of openings intermittently registering with the ports 21,

' the object of the openings 44 being .to fire both casings 14 simultaneously, while the openings v46 are used for alternate firing action. The valve sleeve 30 rotates continuously and is provided with a series of alined openings 48, it being understood that as each opening 48 is rotated into position over its corresponding port 21; one or the other of the openings 44 or 46 of the other sleeve 28 will be overlappingthe port 21 more or less according to the positioning movement which has been imparted to the sleeve 28 by mechanism now to be described.

The shaft 34 is provided with a crank arm 50 operating a' link 52 connected to one arm of the bell crank lever54 to be supported from the framework or in any suitloosely upon the sleeve 32. One face of the lower end of the lever 60 is provided with clutch teeth for engagement with the sliding clutch 62 keyed to the sleeve 32, so that the continuously oscillating lever will, while geared to said clutch, oscillate the sleeve 28 in order to bring the openings 46 into registry alternately with the ports 21 for alternate firing of the pairs of pistons. It will be obvious that if the degree of oscillation of said lever 60, and hence of the sleeve 28, be varied,the degree to which the openings 46 will be registered with the ports 21, and consequently the size of the valve openings, maybe changed to suit the requirements. I obtain this adjustment by shifting the sliding block 58 along the arms of the lever 60, which is done by means of a link 62 pivoted at one end to the said block and at its opposite end to one arm of a bell crank 64 pivoted at 66 to an extension 68 from the valve casing 24. For adjusting the block, the bell crank lever 64 may be operated through the connecting rod 70 by any suitable means from some convenient point, as from the drivers seat in an automobile.

In order to partially turn the sleeve 28 so as to shift from one set of openings to the other set of openings in said sleeve, or to regulate as desired the relative position of openings 44 and ports 21 for simultaneous firing, a gear 72 is loosely mounted to turn upon the sleeve 32 and provided with clutch teeth for engagement with the clutch 62, the gear 72 being held in position between the adjacent end of the casing 28 and a collar 74 fixed to the sleeve 32.

For operating the gear 72 for rotating the casing 28 through the medium of the clutch 62, after the latter has been'disengaged from the arm 60 and clutched with the gear 7 2, a segment gear 76 is pivoted at 78 to the extension 68, with its teeth in engagement with those of the gear 72, said segment be ing connected by a rod 80 to any convenient point of' operation. A lever 82 is pivoted to a bracket 84 and carries a yoke at one end for engagement with a ring 86 of the clutch 62, the other end of the lever 82 being provided with operating connections 88 whereby to slide the clutch by any suitable means from a point convenient to the operator, it being understood that the clutch always is engaged with the arm 60 during alternate firing, but is shifted when it is desired to operate the gear 72.

'The clutch operating connections include springs 90 to insure clutching action should the relative position of the clutch teeth at first prevent their meshing together.

From the foregoing it will be understood that the arrangement and construction described will be particularly adapted for automobile purposes. The oppositely rotating shafts 6 are well suited for driving in reverse directions without complex reversing mechanism. For light duty, the valve may be set for alternate firing of the separate pairs of pistons while for heavier duty the valve-may be changed for simultaneous action" and the size of the valve openings may be regulated as explained for meeting the requirements of speed. In place of the complete cylinder casing for inclosing the entire piston, a great advantage also arises from the construction illustrated whereby the pistons are only partially inclosed by the casing 14, allowing their upper portions, after they have been subject to the explosive action of the gas, to travel out of the casing and be exposed to the cooling action of the outside air.

In the construction so far described no provision is present for obtaining the required pressure in the gas charge and the mechanism by which this is accomplished will now be described. A twin-cylinder air compressor is mounted upon the base 2, and comprises a cylinder casing 92 within which rotates a pair of geared pistons 94 upon shafts 96 carried by the casing 92 and driven by suitable gearing 98 from one of the shafts-6. The cylinder casing 92 has an inlet port 99 and an outlet 100, from which is led a pipe 102 communicating with a storage tank 104. To this tank is connected a pipe 106, having a valve 108 controlled by a connecting rod 110, running to a point convenient to the operator. This pipe 106 as well as an oil supply pipe 112, leads into a nozzle casing 114 having its discharge end threaded into the end of the valve casing 24 opposite the shaft 34 and projecting within the open ends of the sleeves 28 and 30. This nozzle casing carries an adjustable spray 116 and needle 118 extending into proximity to the discharge opening 120 of the casing 114. By this construction a continuous supply of compressed air within the tank is maintained by the engine through the compressor to drive the oil from the nozzle into'the valve casing in a finely atomized condition and under a pressure sufiicient to maintain the required pres-' sure at the firing point. This breaking up and conversion of the fluid into spray or gas under pressure is accomplished without the application of heat and it will be understood that this combination of valve far;

force feed through the ports 21 upon each pair of pistons.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that I haveprovided an eflicient device for carrying out the objects of my invention and while I have illustrated the preferred form of my invention, I'reserve the right to make all changes properly falling within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim 1. In an explosive engine, a pair of pistons, a casing therefor provided with inlet and exhaust ports, a valve casing having an opening communicating with the inlet port,

an oscillatory sleeve Within said valve casing provided with an openingregistering intermittently with said valve casing opening, and a rotary valve within said sleeve having one or more openings adapted to register with the sleeve opening.

2. In a rotary motor,-a pair of pistons, a casing therefor provided with inlet and exhaust ports, a valve casing having an opening communicating with the inlet port, an oscillating valve sleeve within said valve casing provided with an opening registering intermittently with said valve casing opening, a rotary valve within said sleeve having one or more openings adapted to register with the sleeve opening, and means to regulate the degree of oscillation of said sleeve.

3. In a rotary motor, two pairs of pistons, casings therefor provided with inlet and exhaust ports, a valve casing in communication with the inlet ports, a rotary valve within said valve casing, and means for opening communlcation either slmultaneously between said valve and both inlet ports or alternately between said valve and said inlet ports separately.

4. In a rotary motor, two pairs of pistons, casings therefor provided with inlet and exhaust ports, a valve casing having openings communicating with said inlet ports, a sleeve within said valve casing provided with a pair of openings adapted to register simultaneously with both of said valve casing openings, a rotary valve within said sleeve havlng one or more openlngs adapted to register with each of said sleeve openings when the latter are registered with the valve casing openings, and means to oscillate said sleeve to regulate the size of the valve openings.

5. In a rotary motor, two pairs of pistons, casings therefor provided with inlet and exhaust ports, a valve casing having openings communicating with said inlet ports, an oscillating sleeve within said valve casing provided with a pair of openings adapted to register intermittently and alternately with said valve casing openings, a rotary valve within said sleeve having one or more openings adapted to register with each of said sleeve openings when the latter are registered with the valve casing openings, and means to regulate the degree of oscillation of saidsleeve.

6. In a rotary motor, two pairs of pistons casings therefor provided with inlet and exhaust ports, a valve casing having openings communicating with said inlet ports, a sleeve within said valve casing provided with a pair of openings in alinement to register simultaneously with both of said valve casing openings, and also with a pair of openings located out of alinement to register intermittently and alternately with said valve casing openings, a rotary valve within said sleeve having one or more openings adapted to register with said sleeve openings when the latter are registered with the valve casing openings, and means to turn said sleeve to bring either of said pairs of openings into operative relation with said valvecasing openings. I

7. In a rotary motor, two pairs of pistons, casings therefor provided with inlet and exhaust ports, a valve casing having openings communicating with said inlet ports, a

sleeve within said valve casing provided with a pair of openings located in alinement to register simultaneously with both of said valve casing openings, and also with a pair of openings located out of alinement to register intermittently and alternately with said valve casing openings, a rotary valve within said sleeve having one or more openings adapted to register with said sleeve openings when the latter are registered with the valve 7 casing openings, means to turn said sleeve lln testimony whereof, ll affix my signature, in the presence of tWo Witnesses.

ALFRED PETERSQN.

Witnesses:

H. O. RODGERS, G. Y. THORJPE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3037455 *Sep 4, 1957Jun 5, 1962Ford Motor CoPumps
US3156220 *Aug 22, 1960Nov 10, 1964Jr Lloyd E MillerRotary internal combustion engine
US3176664 *Mar 4, 1963Apr 6, 1965Keamon KuroseInternal combustion rotary engine
US3205874 *Jan 17, 1962Sep 14, 1965John P RenshawRotary type positive displacement energy converting device
US3215129 *Feb 15, 1965Nov 2, 1965Johnson Otto WRotary internal combustion motor
US3312200 *Aug 21, 1964Apr 4, 1967Torrington CoEnergy converter
US3312202 *Jul 28, 1964Apr 4, 1967Udelman JaimeRotary internal combustion engine cooled by compressed air
US3724427 *Jun 15, 1971Apr 3, 1973K SauderRotary internal combustion engine
US3745979 *Sep 27, 1971Jul 17, 1973R WilliamsRotary combustion engine
US3777720 *Jan 7, 1972Dec 11, 1973R WilliamsRotary internal combustion engine
US3844117 *Aug 4, 1972Oct 29, 1974T RyanPositive displacement brayton cycle rotary engine
US4074522 *Sep 7, 1976Feb 21, 1978Mcdowell Jimmy JRotary engine
US4620514 *Aug 31, 1984Nov 4, 1986Tseng Ching HoInternal combustion rotary power plant system
US4971002 *Jan 5, 1990Nov 20, 1990Le Le KRotary internal combustion engine
US7255082Mar 9, 2006Aug 14, 2007Zajac Optimum Output Motors, Inc.Rotary valve system and engine using the same
US7325520Jul 12, 2006Feb 5, 2008Zajac Optimum Output Motors, Inc.Rotary valve system and engine using the same
US7328674Jul 12, 2006Feb 12, 2008Zajac Optimum Output Motors, Inc.Rotary valve system and engine using the same
US7421995Jul 12, 2006Sep 9, 2008Zajac Optimum Output Motors, Inc.Rotary valve system and engine using the same
US7594492Jul 12, 2006Sep 29, 2009Zajac Optimum Output Motors, Inc.Rotary valve system and engine using the same
WO1991010052A1 *Jun 29, 1990Jul 11, 1991Le Kim LeRotary internal combustion engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/214, 123/238, 418/200, 123/216
Cooperative ClassificationF02B53/00