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Publication numberUS1152499 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 7, 1915
Filing dateMay 3, 1912
Priority dateMay 3, 1912
Publication numberUS 1152499 A, US 1152499A, US-A-1152499, US1152499 A, US1152499A
InventorsHerman Frasch
Original AssigneeUnion Sulphur Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mining sulfur.
US 1152499 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. FRASCH.

MINING SULFUR,

APPLICATION HLEU MAY 3. 1912.

1,152,499 Patented 5pm. 7, 1015. FZ A Q UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

HERMAN FBASGH, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNOB, BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, TO THE UNION SULPHUR COMPANY, OF JERSEY CITY, NEW JERSEY, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY.

MINING SULFUR.

Application filed May 3, 1912.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that IQLHERMAN Fmscrr, a. citizen of the United States, residing at New York city, Manhattan borough, New York county, inthe State of New York, have invented certa'm' new and useful Improvements in Sulfur, of which the 01 lowing is a specification.

This invention. relates more particularly to obtaiuing sulfm by melting the same'in a natural deposit underground and removing it therefrom in the melted: state; but each of. the improvements composing theinventionis intended to be 'secured' -for all the uses to which it can be applied, with or withoutmodification. 0n October 20, 1891, Patents 461,429 and 461,430 were granted to me for, respectively, the process of and the apparatus for such mining by fu'si'omn fusion fluid (more particularly, but not necessarily exclusively,- water heated under pres sure toabove the melting point ofi'sulfur): being introduced into-the deposit and the melted sulfur being raised to the surface oi the ground by the pressure o'f said fusion fluid in the deposit or by pumping; it that 7 time Ibelieved that sulfur deposits were tight, or, other words, of such natiire that on boring nlnvell hole :into a deposit and in-' troducing iusion fluid through such hole saidfusion fluid 'would'be confined by'thesurrounding material of theideposit to-the "well hole or its immediate vicinity; except as an enlarged cavity should be formed by the removal ofthe sulfur; and Idescribed in' said patents the introduction into the deposit of water of a temperature of about 35 F; above the melting point of sulfur, the removal of thewater whilestill above said meltingpoint, but after such loss oftemperature as should result from the melting operation, and the reintroduction of the water after again raising its temperature to about 35 F. above said melting point. Subsequently when I'found that the/sulfur deposit, which I had specially in mind when I made the so patented inventions, was not tight, but porous, and that it was flooded with water, it became necessary to overcome the difliculties thus presented. Moreover, in working said deposit new difliculties have arisen with the progress of the mining operations. The difliculties have been greater by the fact that Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Sept. '7, 1915.

Serial No. 695,008.

engineering furnished no precedents for dealing with most of them, and by the further fact that the operations were (and are) performed underground away from direct observation, the control of said operations being exercised entirely above ground by men who none of them enter or can enter the deposit.

As described in my patents of September .19, 1905, Numbers 799,642 aud 800-',1 27, and as recited in some of my claims therein, the highly heated water introduced'asfusion fluid into the'deposit flows away underground instead of returning to the surface as set forth in my said Patents 461,429 and 461,430;-and:-im actual working enormous volumes of such highly heated water thus introduced into the deposit have been flowing away underground during a number of years. This water has always carried into the deposit many times as much heat as" would suffice to melt the amount of sulfur actually obtained; and heretoiore, notwithstanding an evident accumulation of heat in the ground, the quantity of heat necesto be'sent intogthe deposit order to obtain therefrom a; given amount of sulfur became larger and larger with the pro ress of exploitation; while the tonnageproducible in a given time with-a given plant becamelessand less. I

I have conceived that the increasing quantity of heat 'required'p'er ton of sulfur ob,-'

tained and the 1 decreasing production per well per day might bo due, in part at least, to a restriction of the fusion fluid (water of melting temperature) to certain parts of the deposit, the fusion fluid being crowded upward by water of lower temperature or excluded thereby from certain cavities in the sulfur bearing'rock and so kept away from much of the sulfur, and that by withdrawal froln'the deposit of'water of a tern drawal of water) and to attain a higher production per well per day than the average of said previous operations and even to ncrease the production per day from particular wells in operation under my prior methods. Further, I believe that I can profitably obtain (if I have not, in fact, already so obtained) sulfur which could not otherwise be obtained profitably if at In accordance with the present invention, therefore, water of a temperature below the melting point of sulfur is withdrawn from a porous water flooded deposit of sulfur into which an appropriate fus'on fluid (more particularly, but not y exclusively, water heated under presure to above the melting point of sulfur) is introduced, and from which sulfur is removed in melted state. The three operations would bat be performed wntemfisoraneously; although it s believed that vantage over the prior stateoftheartmightbeobtainedwithom; contemporaneous ormance of all or even ofanytwoofthem;sincetbeefiectsofsaid water withdrawal and said introduction of frsiun fluid, each of them, continue for a certain time after stoppage of the operation itself. Care muld be taken to insure against the Mdifimfion of the sulfur in the piping b which the melted sulfur is eemo ved andsilodkeep the sulfurf hnlielllted which istoslpply p' ;orw c purposes fusion fluid would ibefizmveyed through appropriate pip' o sulfur raising W615 and be in dduced into the deposit near the sulgilrd intaks continuously during the making sulfur removing operations. Allthefusimfluidmigbtbesointmduced near the sulfur intakes; butit is considered better to introduce the bulk of such fluid elsewhere.

I have, in the results stated, withdrawn water of lower temperature at theraueofabout pflcentbyvolume ofthewater of hem introduced contem into the deposit, millionsofgallonsperdavbeingsowithdrawn from a deposit with a superficial area stimated at les than seventy fire acres; butahigheroralowerpercentagemnbc withdrawn within the limits of the invention; the volume of withdrawn water may even exceed that introduced as fusion fluid; andrariatimiscanbemadeintheamounts per day so withdrawn. By withdrawing the and introduction; since water entering the deposit from subterranean sources may constitute a part (if not all) of the so withdrawn water. By causing water introduced as fusion fluid to flow away underground, the inflow of water from outside into the part of the deposit occupied by said fusion fluid is checked or prevented. This check ing is desirable, but it is not necesarily esential to the invention in its broader aspects I have introduced fusion fluid and removed sulfur from a number of producing wells, which are separated each of them from the nearest water withdrawing well by a horizontal distance of between about two hundred and about eight hundred feet; but such distances may be shorter than two himdred feet and longer than eight hundred feet the limits of the invention. It is important to have a number of water withdrawing wells within influen distance of each other and a number of wells each of them influencing distance of at least one of said water withdrawing wells; although such disposition of wells is not 11 y essential to the invention in its broader as 7 Water of a temperature below the melt ing point of sulfur may be withdrawn at one or more levels; and it is considered advantageous to withdraw it at places below a level at which a large part at least of the fusion fluid is introduced into the deposit, and even below the intake of a Sulfur raising pipe. To insure such withdrawal, piping can be provided with water intakes so located; but pasages in the deposit, nat urally existing therein or formed artificially by working or by boring, may also conduct water from such places at such lower level or levels to pip that terminates at a higher level or love and within the limits of the invention water may be withdrawn from any place or places at which it is of a.

temperature below the melting pointof a sulfur Withdrawal of water might be efiected within the limits of the invention where the presure in the deposit is sufiicient, by allowing the water to escape fi-om the deposit through piping, open at both ends, without employing special agencia to expedite the flow; but it would ordinarily (if not always) be at least advantageous to employ such agencies, whether the pre$ure in the deposit should or should not be able (unaided) to raise water therefrom to the surface of the ground. A pump connected with the piping and located at the surface of the ground could be used; but it is considered important to accelerate the flow to a greater extent than could be elfecued thereby, appropriate accelerating agencies being applied to the water column underground. It is con sidered best to force air into the column of water in such quantity and at such distance below the surface of the ground as to reduce the presure of the overlying column (reaching to the surface of the ground) to the extent of a= number of atmospheres.

The particular deposit herein above meutioned ls flooded with naturally present water; but the invention includes also the working oiporous deposits which have been flooded with water artificially. 'lhe general GSPI'ESlODS water flooded porous de posit and. the like hereinafter apply to and are intendedtoinclude both sorts In the use of a porous deposit not naturally flooded with .water, it is believed that advantage over attempts otherwise to work the same would be obtained by first flooding the deposit artificially with water and then ruining the sulfur therein by the operations and appliances which would be suitable for i sulfurby fusion iromporousdeposits naturally flooded with water or by any appropriate part of said operations and appliances. The artificial flooding with water of a porous deposit preparatory to mining the same by underground fusion can be resorted to when such mining is to be performed in any known or suitable way; and deposits not naturally flooded with water can, therefore, be mined in accordance with the present invention by first flooding the same with water artificially and then proceedingtorueltthesuliurtherein and to remove it ln the melted state thereh-om, with or without withdrawal of water of a temperature below the melting point of sulfur in em d. F-

accornpanymg wings: igures 1, 2 and?) illustrate a form of sulfur producingwelllor combined melting and sulfur raising-well) which it is considered best to employ, but which may be replaced by other forms of producing wells or by separate wells forjntroducing fusion lipid and for removing melted sulfur, 1 showing in elerafion the pi i v of such well with gaps therein at inter-v and indicating in section beds of earthy or rocky material, penetrated by such piping, and Figs. 2 and 3 diowing on a larger scale and in central vertical section the lower and the upper parts of such piping, respectively, certain valves drown in Fig. 1 being omitted from Fig. 3; Fig. 4 illustrates a form of water withdrawing well which it is considered as advantageous as any to employ and which may be replaced by other forms, said well being shown on the scale of Fig. 1 in central vertical action in connection with beds of earthy or rocky material penetrated thereby and containing gaps similar to those of Figs 1, 2 and; 3, except that- Fig. 4 shows the well between levels which are included in one of thegaps of Figs. 1 and 3; and Fig. 5

is 11 in plan showing the superficial area of a deposit and the locations of the two kinds of wells thereon, such locations being merely by way of example. The portion of piping omitted at each gap in Figs. 1, *2, 3 and A} is the same as is represented above and below the same gap.

The pipe 0; (Figs. 1 and 3) is best in telescoping sections (see Patent 9774+ granted on December 6, 1910, to my assignee). The branch 6, provided with valve 12, supplies fusion fluid thereto; best in the form of water heated to corresponding temperature by direct condensation in it of steam at a pressure of from ninety to a hundred nods to the re inch (we my said atents 799,6liand 809,127). The lower section of pipe a fits for a large part of its length within said upper section; and projects below the latter to such distance as may be desired. A stufiing box between them is composed (as shown in Fig. 3) of an esternally flanged ring 0 fast on the lower ipe section and a follower d which is hel by nuts on bolts 6 (anchored in ring a) and eorupreses the pa 0 between itself and theflangeofringcan againstthewallof the iuclosing pipe section.

The upper section is represented in Fig. 1 as posing through beds f g (the upper bed a}; of clay and the lower say of sand or of mixed sand and gravel) to a bed of nonprcductive rock k; while the lower section promeds on down to the deposit (or bed of producing rock) i and into the same to such extent, if any, as may be desired. Beds respectively of from fifty to two hundred feet in thickness may be asumed by way of or ample. It will, of course, be understood that the character and thickness of beds composing or overlying different deposits, and even difi'erent parts of the same deposit will naturally vary. A shoe 0 is shown at the bottom of the lower section of pipe 41.

Below the pipe a is a stout perforated k; which fills the well ho e at least approximately (see Patent 1,008,319 granted to my assignee on November 14, 1911) and is provided with a strmer section Z that is connected through a swaged nipple m with a supporting pillar n of smaller diameter; whose foot rests on the bottom of the bore hole. The latter may terminate either at or above or below the bottom of the deposit, as may be considered bestin each instance. The pillar n would be of a suitable length to locate the strainer section 1 in the best. position or what the operator may consider to be such; and said pillar may be omitted if not desired.

Inside the pipe a and well hole E:

nected with each other by the screw collar 2:. Other collars connecting lengths of pipe are shown at the ill.

Upon the ring 25 rests the casting z. The interior strainer 31 (of perforated pipe closed at its lower end by a screw plug is screwed into and depends from the bottom of said casting. The perforated (or outlet) section a of the inner fusion fluid pipe 9 is screwed into the top of said casting. The latter forms a perforated partition or plug which shuts oil the interior strainer y from the inner fusion fluid pipe 9 so long as the collar (composed of bushing 2' and coupling; 3) near the lower end of the sulfur raising pipe is seated on said casting (see Patents 799,642 and $00,127, hereinbeforc referred to)- The lower end of the. sulfur raising pipe (of reduced diameter as shown) projects through the casting is. This upholds ordinarily the sulfur raising pipe 1- as well x the i mer fusion fiuid pipe 9; but the pipe r can be raised above the casting by at the surface of the ground whaiever it may be desired to put said pipe 9 into communication through said a: with the strainer 1. The pipes g and r pasflheformerthro hastufingboxion the head of pipe 2, an the latter through a stufingboxponaT-attheupperendof pipe g. A branch pipe 5, with valve 6, supplies fusion fluid to pipe g. A branch pipe T, with valve 8, conveys melted sulfur from pipe 7 to a suitable receptacle (not shown) for the sulfur. The branch pipe 1;, with valve 9, supplies fusion fluid when desired to the sulfur raising pipe r for conveyance by the latter into the deposit; branch 7 be ing closed at such time beyond the junction with it of branch 2 {see Patent. 870,620 granted on Kovember 12. 1907, to my assigee}. The valves 8 and 9 Slld branches would be adapted for the interior disks or closurs fliereof to be loosened by a blow should they stick fast (see Patent 988 994 granted on April 11 1911, to y assigneel- The air pipe 8 has at the bottom a section 10 which is perfora'zedwith small holes -mthat theescapingairwill mingleiububbles with the melted sulfur. Portions of pipe 3 otherwise detached from mch other are screwed (as shown) from above and belovv'respeefively into the plug 11; which supports said pipe 3 and is secured to the T at the top of pipe r through the flanged couplings 1:? and a nipple. Al: 13 is a valve.

The pipe ll of each water withdrawing well (Fig. l) p-ms (us shown through the beds f g to the non-productive rock I: overlying the deposit producing rock) j; while the pipe extends through the pipe 14 to, and for such distance (if any) as may be des' into, the deposit j. These pipes are each of 'them upheld by the rock on which it rests. The pipe 15 projects above the top of pipe 14.

lVithin the upper portion of pipe 15 and projecting above itis the pipe 16; and within the latter is theair pipe 17, having a per forated bottom section 18. The pipe 16 as shown is supported by the pipe 15 by means i of a collar (coupling) 19 which rests on the upper end of a swagcd nipple 20. At 21, 210 and 211, respectively, other collars (couplings) are shown. Between'flie collar 19 and'nipplc -20, 2-2 is shown; and packing 23 is also shown the overlying collar 21 and the of pipe 14. If desired, the space bctwearpipos 14 and 15 can be filled (for packing purposes) with earthorclay;whichcanbemixedwith filer and introduced in the gm osfmpgi air pipe 17 passes thro a v box 24. It is upheld by a collar 21 of said pipe resting on the follower 25 of the stufiingl llieox. At- 26 is a. valve.

bore hole 27 of the well is continued below the pipe 15 to such depth as may be desired. The pipe 15 could also be provided with a perforated or an uuperforabed extension; say, for example, a well hole lining suchasshownatkhfigs1,2and3,but without perforations, if so preferred. As shown in Fig. 4., there are a few holes at 28 near the bottom of pipe-15 to provide for the ingres ofwater in case the wall of well bore 27 belowsaid pipe should fall in and so obstruct the inthe bottom of pipe 15. A shoe 29 is shown-at the bottom of pipe 15. In F' 5 the superficial areaof a deposit.

' hundred feet acres at'its minor axis. The

locations of wells shown are by way of an illustrative example onlv. Itis not expected that producing wells should i aid indefinitely; and new wells would be sunk and equipped and exploited as ma? be con the bore holes of the water withdrawing wells not only below the level at which fusion fluid is introduced into the deposit.

but also below the level from which melted 5 sulfur is removed. With the producing well of Figs. 1. 2 and 3 the hull; of the fusion fluid would be forced down the pipe a and would be introduced into the deposit j through perforations in the well hole lining i.- near the upper end of said lining and the melted sulfur would be taken in through the bottom of the pipe 1'. The water withdmwing well shown in Fig. 4 has its water intake at the bottom of pipe at, a level which may be above or below the bottom of pipe (1 of any given producing well. although with the bottoms of pipes a and 15 at the same level water may reach the pipe 15 the bore hole '27 from a level J even below the lowest sulfur intake. The water intakes for places at which the water is taken into the piping of the water withdrawing wells) could be at an desired level appropriate to receiving water of a temperature below the melting point of sulfur.

The fusion fluid conveyed through the pipe 9 and introduced into the deposit a short distance above the sulfur intake insures against solidification of sulfur in pipe r and keeps the sulfur melted which is to supply said pipe. After the fusion fluid is once liberated it tends to rise. being hotter and consequently lighter than the water bv which the lower partof the producing well i is surrounded; so that a melting temperature would not necessarily exist even a few feet away from said well. It is believed that the withdrawal of water of a temperature be low the melting point of sulfur operates to 1 enlarge the fusion zone of each producing well. or at least of each producing well within influencing distance of such withdrawn].

In normal working, while sulfur is being removed through the pipe 1- of each producing well. water of a temperature above the melting point of sulfur (constituting the fusion fluidl is introduced into the deposit through pipes a and q of each producing well; and water of a temperature below the melt ng point of sulfur is withdrawn from the deposit through pipes 15 and 16 of each water withdrawing well; the'three operations being performed contemporaneously. The fusion fluid is introduced as fast say as it will flow through said pipes at and q under prcsure of between ninety and a hundred pounds to the square inch. in the heaters (not shown herein. but illustrated in" Patents 39.64;? and 800,127 herein above mentioned) connected with said pipes The well hole linings of the producingwells may be say eight inches in ill fllfnal diameter and the inner fusion fluid 5 pipe 9 five inches where it is inclosed by said lining, the sulfur raising pipe being say three inches in internal diameter. The water is withdrawn at such rate as to equal say about eight per cent. more or less of that introduced as fusion fluid. The bottom of the air pipe 1? of each water withdrawing well would advantageously be placed so far below ground (my three hundred feet, more or less. where the pressure in, the deposit, would bring water to the surface) that the back pressure of the overlying column would be reduced by a number of atmosphem and the flow of water from the deposit through such well would be correspondingly expedited.

Whenever occasion arises, the air is shut off from pipe 8. thus allowing the melted sulfur in pipe 1- to sink to the level at which a column of melted sulfur (unmixed with air) would balance the pressure in the deposit. The valve 8 being closed and the valve 9 opened, water (fusion fluid) can then be forced through the sulfur raising pipe into the deposit. either for cleaning the strainers y and l or for increasing the melting. When thought best. the removal of melted sulfur can be resumed.

Operations and appliances appropriate to obtaining sulfur fi-om water flooded deposits by underground fusion without the water withdrawal of the present invention (see patents herein above mentioned and, in addition. patents granted to my Xumber 928, 036 on July 13, 1909, and Number 988.995 on April 11, 1911) can ordinarily. if not always, be used in connection with such water withdrawal In the case of a porous sulfur deposit which is not flooded with naturally present. water and which (an be flooded with water artificially it is considered advantageous to introduce water into the same until it is flooded to the depth desired and then to proceed as if dealing with a porous deposit flooded with naturally present water. obtaining sulfur from such artificially flooded deposit it is considered that it would be best to withdraw water of a temperature below the melting point of sulfur therefrom contemporaneously with the introduction of fusion fluid thereinto and the removal of the melted sulfur therefrom as herein demri ed: but. it is believed that. sulfur could be obtained therefrom as from a naturally flooded porous deposit by means of said three operations and appropriate appliances without contemporaneous performance of said three operations and also by introduction of fusionfiuid and removal of melted sulfur Without Withdrawal of water of term perature below the melting point of sulfur. Producing wells of the character illustmtedinFigs. 1,2and3orofothersuitable character could be used in appropriate cases with or without water porous stancedeposit of true appliances in order to mine by fusion a porous deposit flooded with water artificially.

Modifications either in process or appa rarus for working a porous deposit either naturally or artificially flooded with water can be made indefinitely so long as the substance of any one or more of the hereinafter written claims is taken.

The expresion subfiance mined" means sulfur primarily, but notnecessarily exclusirely, in each of the claims in which the expression occurs. It is intended to include any fusible substance which can be mined in accordance with the recitals of the claims I claim as my invention or discovery:

1. The process of mining by fun'on, consisting in withdrawing water of a temperature below the melting point of the substance mined from a water flooded porous deposit of such substance through an artificially provided pasage, introducing fusion fluid into said deposit, and removing the melted substance from slid deposit, sub stantially as described.

2. The proce of mining by fusion, cons sting in withdrawing water of a temperature below the melting point of the submined from a water flooded porous such substance through an artificially provided pasage, introducing fusion fluid into said deposit, and removing the melted substance from said deposit oontem eously with withdrawal of water of said non-melting temperature, substancially as described 3. The process of mining by fusion, con sisting in withdrawing water of a temperature below the melting point of the sub stance mined from a water flooded porous depositof such substance through an artificially provided pasage, introducing fusion fluid into said depositcontemporaneously with withdrawal of water of said non melting temperature, and removing the melted substance from said deposit, substantially as deszribed.

4. The process of mining by fusion, consisting in water of a temperature below the melting point of the substance mined from a water flooded porous dc t of such substance thron an artificially provided pasagr in cing fusion fluid into said deposit, and removing the melted subziance fropgrmf mideleposit, the three operations orm contemporaneously, snhsta ti dl ly as described 5- The proces of mining by fusion, conin 'vriihdrawing water of a temperabelow the melting point of the substance mined from a. water flooded porous deposit of such substance through an artificially provided passage. introducing fusiorr fluid into said deposit and in part at least near an intake for the melted substance, keeping the piping'through which the melted substance is removed at a tem perature above the melting point of the latter by conveyance of fusion fluid in appropriate relation to said piping, and removing the melted substance from the deposit through said piping, substantially as described.

6. The proces of mining by fusion, consisting in withdrawing water of a temperature below the melting point of the substance mined from a water flooded porous deposit of such substance through an artificially provided passage, introducing fusion fluid into said deposit in main part elsewhere and in smaller part near an intake for the melted substance, keeping the piping through which the melted substance is rcmoved at a temperature above the melting point of the latter by conveyance of fusion fluid in appropriate relation to said piping, and removing the melted substance from the deposit through said piping, substantially as described.

1 The process of mining by fusion, con

sisting in withdrawing water of a temperature below the melting point; of the sub stance mined from a water flooded porous deposit of such substance through a well located laterally a so diianoe from the point of introduction of fusion fluid into slid deposit and yet within influencing dis tance of the same, fusion fluid into said deposit, and removing the melted substance from said deposit, substantially as described.

8. The process of mining by fusion, consisting in withdrawing water of a temperature below the melting point of the substance mined from a water flooded porous deposit of such substance through an artificially provided pasage,introducing fusion fluid into said deposit in larger volume than that of the m withdrawn water of non-melting temperature after deducting from the former volume an amount equal to the volume of the removed substance, so thatpart at leastof said fusion fluid must flow away underground, and remofingigmelted substance from said deposit, su tially as described.

9. The process of mining by fusion, consisting in withdrawing water of a temperature below die melting point of the substance mined from a water flooded porous deposit of such substance through a number of water withdrawing wells in sufiicieut voltune to influence the mining conditions within an extended area of said deposit, introclucing fusion fluid into said deposit within said area, and removing the melted substance from said deposit, substantially as described.

10. The process of mining by fusion, consisting in withdrawing water of a tempera ture below the melting point of the substance mined from a water flooded porous depositof such substance through a number of water withdrawing wells located within influencing distance of each other, introducing fusion fluid into said deposit by means of a number of melting wells located each of them within influencing distance of at least one of said water withdrawing wells, and removing the melted substance by means of wells distinct from said water withdrawing wells, substantially as described.

11. The process of mining by fusion, consisting in withdrawing water of a temperature below the melting point of the substance mined from a water flooded porous deposit of such substance b v means of at least one well whose bore hole extends below a level atwhich fusion fluid is introduced into the deposit, introducing fusion fluid into said depos t. and removing the melted sub stance from said deposit, substantially as described.

1:2- The process of mining by fusion, consisting in withdrawing water of a temperatime below the melting point of the substance mined from a water flooded porous deposit of such substance by means of at leastone well whose bore hole extends below the level of at least one intake for the melted substance. introducing fusion fluid into said deposit and removing the melted substance from said deposit, substantially as described.

13. The proc1e$ of mining by fusion, consisting in withdrawing water of a temperature below the melting point of the substance mined from a water flooded porous deposit of such substance through an artificially provided pamage, accelerating the outflow through said pmge relatively to thatwbich would take place through the same under the presume in the deposit: in-

troducing fusion fluid into the deposit, and remo'ring the melted substance from said deposit. substantially as described.

14. The prom of miningby fusion, con sisiing in water of a temperature below the melting point of the substance mined from a. water flooded porous deposit of such substance through an artificially provided introducing aeriform fluid into the underground column of water. reducing by such introduclaouof aeriform fluid the pressure of the column which reaches fi-om the place of introduction to the surface of the ground to the extent of a number of aiznospheres, accelerating in this way the outflow through said pasage relatively to that which would take place through the some against the unveduced preure of said column, introducing fusion fiuid intojhe deposit, and remofing the melted substance from said deposit; substnntially as described. V V 15. The process oimining by fusion, conin withdrawing during current working water of a temperature below the melting point of the substance mined from a water flooded porous deposit of such sub stance through an artificially provided passage, introducing fusion fluid into said deposit, and removing the melted substance from said deposit, substantially as described.

16. The process of mining by fusion. consisting in introducing fusion fluid into a water flooded porous deposit of the sub stance mined, withdrawing water through an artificially provided passage from on"- side the fusion zone of the so introduced fluid, and removing the melted substance from the deposit, substantially as described.

17. The proces of mining by fusion, consisting in artificially flooding a porous deposit with water, and subsequently withdrawing water of a temperature below the melting point of the substance mined from the so flooded deposit, introducing fusion fluid into said deposit, and removing the melted Substance from said deposit. sub staniziallp as described.

18. The pm of mining by fusion, consisting in artificially flooding a porous deposit with water, and subsumentl introducing fusion fluid into said deposit, and removing the melted substance from said deposit, substantially as described.

19. The process of preparing a porous depositfor by underground fusion. consisting in artificially flooding a porous deposit of water insoluble fusible SHbSEdnce with water preparatory to the fusion of said substance within the so formed artificial body of water, substantially as described.

20. Apparatus for mining by fusion, consisting of a water withdrawing well with its water intake at a place in a water flooded porous deposit of the substance mined at which water of a temperature below the melting point of said substance will be to ken in means for introducing fusion fluid into said deposit, and means for removing the melted substance from said deposit. snbsinntially as described.

21- Apparatus for mining by fusion. consisting of a water withdrawing well with its water intake at a place in a water flooded porous deposit of the substance mined at which wake!- of a temperature below the melting point of said substance will be taken in, means for introducing fusion fluid into said deposit. and means for removing the melted substance from said depositcontemporaneously with such withdrawal of water, substantially as described.

%2. Apparatus for mining by fusion. conof 'a. water withdrawing well with its water intake at a place in a water flooded porous deposit 'of the substance mined at which water of a temperature below the melting point of said substance will be taken in, means for introducing fusion fluid water withdrawing well whose bore hole extends below at least one intake for the melted substance and which has its water intake at a place at which water will be taken in of a temperature below the melting point of slid sulbstance, substafntially 1s desucslribed 32. p aratus or mining v on. consisting of a water withdrawing well with its water intake at a place in a water flooded porous deposit of the substance mined atwhich water of a temperature below the melting point of said substance will be taken in. means for introducing fusion fluid into said deposit, and means for removing the melted substance from said deposit, said water withdrawing well having provision for accelerating the outflow of the water of said non-melting temperature as compared with the outflow which would take place under the pressure in the deposit, substantiallyisdescribedf. b fusi 33. i paratus ormmmg v on, consisting (ii a water withdrawing well with its water intake at a place in a water flooded porous deposit of the substance mined at which water of a temperature below the melting pointof said substance will be taken in, means for introducing fusion fluid into said deposit, and means for removing the melted substance from sa d deposit, mid water withdrawing well having provision for accelerating the outflow of the water of said non-melting temperature by introducing aeriform fluid underground into the water column in such manner as to reduce the presure of an overlying column reach ing to the surface of the ground to the extent of a number of atmospheres, substantially as described.

34. Apparatus for mining by fusion, conof a water withdrawing well with its water intake at a place in a water flooded porous deposit of the substance mined at which water of a temperature below the melting point of said substance will be taken in during current worln'ng, means for introducing fusion fluid into said deposit, and means for removing the melted substance from said deposit, substantially as described.

35. Apparatus for mining by fusion, con sisting of means for introducing fusion fluid into a water flooded porous deposit of the substance mined, a water withdrawing well with its water intake at a place outside of the fusion zone of the so introduced fluid, and means for removing the melted sub stance from said deposit, substantially as described.

36. Apparatus for mining by fusion, con sisting of means whereby a porous deposit of the substance mined can be flooded with water artificially, a water withdrawing well with its water intake at a place in said deposit at which water of a temperature below the melting point of mid substance will be taken in, means for introducing fusion fluid into said deposit, and means for removing the melted substance from said deposit, substantially as described.

3?. Apparatus for mining by fusion, consisting of means whereby a porous deposit of the substance mined can be flooded with water artificially, means for introducing fusion fluid into said porous deposit, and means for removing the melted substanm, substantially as described.

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature in presence of two witneses.

HERMAN FBASCH. lVitnesses:

C. M. Foam, A. F. Oar-meg.

copicsufthispatzntmybeobtainedfuivecentseackbyaddreslngthc Gonmisioneruthtents, wasmmncr It is hereby certified that in Letters Patent No. 1,152,499; granted September I 1915, upon the application of Herinan Frasch of New York, N. Y., for an improve ment in Mining Sulfur," an error appears in the printed s pecification requirin-.

correction follows: Page 8, line 108, claim 29, for the word withstnndin read withdrawing; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of "the case in the Patent Office.

Signed and sealed this 23d d'ay of May, A. 1)., 1916.

[SEAL] J. T. NEWTON,

' Acting Commissioner of Patents. Cl. 8378.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2991987 *Dec 31, 1956Jul 11, 1961Submerged Comb IncProcesses for heating a mining liquid and mining therewith a substance modified by heat
US4869555 *Jan 6, 1988Sep 26, 1989Pennzoil Sulphur CompanyApparatus for recovery of sulfur
Classifications
U.S. Classification299/6, 299/4
Cooperative ClassificationE21B43/285