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Publication numberUS1153441 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 14, 1915
Filing dateJun 10, 1915
Priority dateJun 10, 1915
Publication numberUS 1153441 A, US 1153441A, US-A-1153441, US1153441 A, US1153441A
InventorsHenry Piessens
Original AssigneeHenry Piessens
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arch or instep supporter.
US 1153441 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. PIESSENS.

ARCH 0R INSTEP SUPPORTEH. APPLICATION FILED JUNE 10, 1915.

Patented Sept. 14, 1915.

2 SHEETS-SHEET l.

glenn-M10@ @vih/Lenovo H. PIESSENS. AncHloR INSTEP suPPoRTEH.

Peeeeted Sepe. 14, 1915.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

gnou/1)( oz HENRY PIESSENS, OF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA.

ARCI-I 0R INSTEP SUPPORTER.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed .Tune 10, 1915. Serial No. 33,228.

To all whom it may concern.'

Be it known that I, HENRY PIEssENs, a subject of the King of Belgium, residing at Philadelphia, in the county of Philadelphia and State of Pennsylvania,` have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Arch or lnstep Supporters, of which the following is a speciiication.

The invention relates to arch or instepsupporting shoes, boots, slippers, etc., and

the object of the invention is to incorporate within the shoe, or other footwear, a' stiiii" arch or instep supporting member and to modify the construction of the shoe in a manner that the said supporting member may be readily inserted in the shoe during manufacture of the latter to be rmly held against displacement and to afford no discomfort and give the most beneficial results to the wearer.

' With these and other objects inl view, as,

will be brought out hereinafter, reference will be had to the accompanying drawingsv .view of the metal arch or instep supporting member. Fig. 4 is a bottom plan viewl of the shoe in the process of manufacture, Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional view on line 5-5 of Fig. 1, and Fig. 6 is a view in vertical secl tion taken on line 6 6 of Fig. 1.

Referring to the drawings, reference numeral 1 designates the insole, which conforms to theshape of the shoe. rlhe leather upper 2 and cloth lining 3 conform with each other in shape and have their lower edgesturned over the insole and other parts in the usual manner preparatory to receiving the sole and heel.

. sists of a single piece of thick and rather rlhe counter stiHener conwhich extends across the bottom of the shoe and 'has a tapered edge "6 which overlaps the correspondingly-'tapered edge 6 of the other side wall portion of the counter 4. At'the heel portion, the counter stifi'ener flap 5 does not extend entirely to the heel extremity of the shoe,but is cut away as at 5 thereby affording an opening in the counter member as a whole and likewise aifording a cushioning element yfor the shoe heel in the nature of an air space. v

Between the counter stiffener flap 5 and the corresponding lportion of the insole -1 is placed a metal or other stiff arch supporting` member 7, and between this member 7 and Patented Sept. 44, i915.

padding 8, said padding being at least of sufiicient area to cover and extend beyond the outer edges of the metal arch or instep supporting member 7 The said metal Supporting member 7 is extended laterally and upwardlyl into a wingy portion 9 which iitsl the instep of-'the footl The inner sole on one side of its shank portion is likewise extended into a wing portion 10, andv this latter portion 10 not only serves to cover thel wing portion 9 of the metal supporting member, but assists to a degree in supporting the arch or instep of the foot. The felt 8 prevents the .metal supporting member 7 from being felt by the foot through the innersole. rlFacks 1,1 passed through holes 12 provided in opposite ends of the metal supporting member 7 and clinched in the innersole 1, secure said member 7 to said innersole. v

The innersole with the metal supporting member 7 tacked thereto is prevented from shifting within the shoe by a line of stitching 14, which line is continuous around the entire peripheral edge portion of the inner sole, with the exception of a break at one side portion of the shank of the insole. At

the toe portion of the shoe, the stitching 14 passes through the welt 15, upper 2, lining 3, and partially through the innersole 1.` At the heel portion of the shoe, these stitches 14 pass through the upper 2, counter stiflfener 4, lining 3, innersole 1, and in some cases through the felt 8, according to the extension of the latter. Where the break occurs in the lin'e of stitching 14, the innersole is not caught bythe stitches, the stitching at that point, as in Fig. 6, being only through the welt 15, upper 2, counter stiener side 4 and Hap 5, and lining 3. c

It is immaterial as to the type of stitching employed, the type adopted being the most suitable to the situation, and if necessary or desirable, the stitching may extend A entirely through the insole instead of only catching into the under face thereof.

In the course of manufacture of the shoe, the felt 8 and metal arch supporting member 7 are inserted and the latter tacked before the stitching 14 is run, and when these parts are in place, the counter stifener flap 5 is closed over said parts and its overlappingedges 6 and 6 then secured together by said stitching 14; and the stitching further employed as described to secure the insole to the other parts of the shoe.

What is claimed:

1. A shoe having an innersole, an outersole, and a counter stiffener, said counter stifener including a flap passing across the bottom of the shoe between the innersole and outersole, and an' instep supporter located between said counter stiffener flap and 4said innersole.

2. A shoe having an innersole, an outersole, and a counter sti'ener, said counter stiiiener including a flap passing across the bottom of the shoe between the innersole sole, an upper, and a counter stiifener, said counter stiilener including a fla-p passing across the bottom of the shoe between the innersole and outersole, ,said upper, counter stiifener and innersole being stitched together.

4:. A shoe having an innersole, an outersole, an upper, and a counter stiEener, said counter stiilener including a flap passing across the bottom of the shoe between the innersole and outersole, and an instep supporter located between said counter st1 fener f'lap and said innersole, said upper, counter stiffener and innersole being stitched together.

5. A shoe having an innersole, an outersole, an upper, and a counter stifener, said counter stiener including a flap passing across the bottom of the shoe between the innersole and outersole, said upper, counter stiffener and innersole being stitched together there being a break in the stitching at the instep of the shoe, and an instep supporting member secured to the innersole between the latter and the counter stifener flap and having a lateral extension extending through said break in the stitching.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

HENRY PIESSENS.

Witnesses:

WILLIAM MONTGOMERY. WALTER W. CALMORE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5546680 *Sep 17, 1993Aug 20, 1996Lacrosse Footwear, Inc.Safety footwear
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/171, 36/17.00R, 36/76.00R
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/142