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Publication numberUS1154334 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1915
Filing dateJan 21, 1915
Priority dateJan 21, 1915
Publication numberUS 1154334 A, US 1154334A, US-A-1154334, US1154334 A, US1154334A
InventorsFrederick C Overbury
Original AssigneeFlintkote Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making roofing elements.
US 1154334 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. C. OVERBURY.

METHOD OF MAKING ROOFING ELEMENTS.

APPLlCATlON FILED JAN. 21. 1915.

Patented Sept. 21, 1915.

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FREDERICK C. OVERIBURY, OF MONTCLAIR, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR TO FLINTKOTE MANUFACTURING COMPANY, OF RUTHERFORD, NEW JERSEY, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY.

METHOD OF MAKING ROOFINGELEMENTS.

Patented Sept. 21, 1915.

Application filed January 21, 1915. Serial No. 3,481.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, FREDERICK C. OVER- BURY, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Montclair, in the county of Essex and State'of New Jersey, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Methods of Making Roofing Elements, of which the following is a specification. v

This invention relates to a process of making waterproof coverings for roofs or side walls, such as may for simplicity be termed roofing elements, and it has for its object to provide a novel and economical method or process of making such elements.

According to my invention, I deposit upon I the plastic coating ofia waterproofed sheet of fibrous material bands or stripes of grit, such as crushed mineral material. Then, if

desired, I deposit upon the interveningspaces grit of another color, shade or tint, thereby producing a novel and highly ornamental efi'ect. If desired, the sheet may then be severed transversely into strips of the same length and breadth. \Vhen thus severed into strips, the elements so formed may be laid horizontally in vertically overlapping rows, with the stripes or bands of one row either registering with or else breaking joint with those of the adjacent rows, to produce different effects. The stripes or vbandsof grit are produced by effecting a relative movement of the sheet and the hop pers or containers for the grit, as for example by feeding the sheet longitudinally beneath the ports leading from the hoppers, in which case the stripes or bands will be straight, but, by effecting at the same time a relative lateral movement of the sheet and the hopper, the stripes may be formed in curved or undulating lines to produce very pleasing effects. The roofing element may thus be in the form of a sheet, or else the sheet may be. cut or severed into pieces of small size of the desired configuration.

On the accompanying drawings, I have illustrated conventionally roofing elements embodying the invention, and simple instrumentalities which may be employed in their manufacture.

Referring. to said drawings, Figure 1 illustrates in plan view a machine which may be used for supplying grit to form on a different color.

differently colored grit. Fig.2 shows a side elevation of the same. Figs. 3 and 4 illustrate sections through the hoppers for feedlng the grit. Fig, 5 represents a portion of the sheet having the stripes and bands of grit embedded therein. Fig. 6 represents a shingle strip cuttherefrom. Fig. 7 repre-- sents a section through the element on the l1n e 7-7'of Fig. 6. Fig. 8 shows how the shlngle strips may be laid.

As a body or foundation, I employ any applying to one or both faces thereof a coating of Waterproof adhesive material such as pitch or asphaltum in a soft and plastic state. After "passing the rolls, the sheet is fed beneath hoppers 12, 18, or other forms of distributing or feeding devices for applymg the grit to the soft coating thereon.

The first hopper is shown as having separated deliverv. spouts or apertures 14, 14, through which grit of one color, say green, slate or black, may be dropped in separated streams upon the sheet traveling therebeneath, so that the grit will adhere to the coating in continuous and substantially parallel stripes 18. Bv reciprocating the hopper endwise, Wavy or undulating stripes may be produced. In the hopper 13, the grit, which may for example be red, brown or of any other contrasting color, tint or shade, is dropped in a thin sheet upon the striped foundation sheet, and the grit which engages the uncoated portions of the adhesive coating will adhere thereto. The sheet may then be passed through one or more pairs of pressure and cooling rolls 16, 17 to embed the adhering grit into the adhesive coating, and, as the sheet passes over and through the rolls, those portions of the grit from the hopper 13, which fall upon the stripes of grit from the hopper 12, fall off or are dislodged, leaving the stripes showing with intervening bands or spans 19 of a A fan or blower may be usedfor blowing the loose grit ofi from the stripes, at a point between the hoppers and the first pair of rolls. From the final rolls the sheet maybe wound up in a suitable roll and used in sheet form or else it [may be then advanced to a cutting machine not shown, to be cut transversely to form what I term shingle strips. In such case, the lines of division may be say 10 inches apart, so that each finished element will be approximatelv 40 inches in length and 10 inches in width or height, as shown in Fig. 6.

The width of the several stripes'and the intervening bands may vary, but I have found that stripes approximately from to 1 inch wide produce'a pleasing effect. The number of transverse or vertical stripes on the individual elements may be varied, and they may be formed equal distances apart, or at varying distances, to produce any desired design. If desired, one end -margin of the element may be striped and the other unstriped, as shown in the lastmentioned figure, so that, when the ends of the elements are abutted as shown in Fig. 8, the stripes if parallel will be evenly spaced. If desired, however, the grit may be omitted from a narrow space at either or both ends of the element, to permit them to be overlapped lengthwiseof the row, when laid.

If desired, the hopper 13 may be provided 'with partitions 20to contain grit of different colors in the compartments formed thereby. These partitions may register with the spouts or nozzles of the hopper 12, so that the bands or lines of grit between the stripes will differ in color therefrom and from-each other to produce a variegated and ornamental effect.

In Fig. 7, which illustrates a lengthwise section through ashingle strip,

the impregnated and waterproofed foundation is indi-' cated at 10, and the waterproof coating at 22, the stripes of grit at 18, and the intervening bands of grit at 19.

I have herein referred to the formation of stripes and bands merely for the purposes of description. It is quite evident that the width of the stripes and bands may be varied as deemed advisable, so that the stripes may be as wide or wider than the bands of grit. In some cases, in. lieu of supplying the second hopper, under which the sheet travels, with crushed mineral of the nature of slate, granite or the like, I may supply the second hopper with pulverized mice. or with talc so that the parallel spaces between the stripes will be left uncoated with grit but be prevented from sticking to adjacent layers or convolutions of the roofing material. In this case, the stripes will in all probability be much wider than they are shown, this being permitted by employattempting to set forth all of the forms in which it may be made or all. of themodes of its use, what I claim is:

1. A method of making roofing elements which consists in embedding longitudinal stripes of crushed mineral material in the adhesive coating of a sheet of roofing material, and then cutting said sheet transversely to form strips having said stripes crosswise thereon.

2. A method of making roofing elements, which consists in applying an adhesive to the face of an elongated fibrous sheet, embedding lines of crushed mineral .material in said adhesive to form longitudinal stripes, and then cutting said sheet transversely to form sections of the same width 'and length. A method of making roofing elements, which consists in applying an adhesive to the face of an elongated fibrous sheet, embedding lines of crushed mineral material in said adhesive to form longitudinal stripes, and embedding crushed mineral material of another color in the uncoated portions of said adhesive to form intervening bands. 3

4. A method of making roofing elements, which consists in applying an adhesiveto the face of an elongated fibrous sheet, embedding lines of crushed mineral material in said adhesive to form longitudinal stripes, embedding crushed mineral material of another color in the uncoated portions of said adhesive to form intervening bands, and cutting said sheet transversely into shingle of fibrous material lengthwise, applying thereto a coating of waterproof adhesive substance, passing said sheet under separated streams of crushed mineral material to cause said material to adhere in stripes to said adhesive substance, pressing said material into the said coating, and then cutting said sheet transversely into sections.

7. The method of making roofing elements, which consists of moving an elongated sheet of fibrous material lengthwise, applying thereto a coating of waterproof adhesive substance, passing said sheet under separated streams of crushed mineral material to cause 'said material to adhere in stripes to material to adhere to said' coating between c said stripes, and removing the surplus crushed mineral material.

8. The method of making roofing elements, which consists of moving an elongated sheet of fibrous material lengthwise, applying thereto a coating of waterproof adhesive substance, passing said sheet under separated streams of crushed mineral material to cause said material to adhere in stripes to said adhesive substance, then passing said sheet through a shower of crushed mineral material of a different color to cause saidmaterial to adhere to said coating between said stripes, and then severing said sheet crosswise into sections of substantially the same length and width.

9. A method of making waterproof roofing, which consists of applying a waterproof adhesive to the face of a fibrous sheet, passing said sheet under separated streams of crushed mineral material to cause said material to adhere in lines to the face of said foundation, and embedding said material in the adhesive coating.

10. A method of making waterproof roofing, which consists of applying a waterproof adhesive to the face of a fibrous sheet, passing said sheet under separated streams of crushed mineral material, and simultaneously effecting a relatively lateral movement of the sheet and said streams, to cause said material to adhere to the adhesive in curved lines.

11. A method of making waterproof roofing, which consists of applying a Waterproof adhesive to the face of a fibrous sheet, pass- 1 'ing said sheet under separated streams of crushed mineral material, simultaneously effecting a relatively lateral movement of'the sheet .and said streams, to cause said material to adhere to the adhesive in curved lines, embedding said material in said adhesive, and cutting said sheets into sections.

12. A method of making roofing elements, which consists in passing a sheet of fibrous material having an adhesive waterproof coating beneath separated streams of crushed mineral material to cause said material to adhere thereto in lines or stripes, and then passing said sheet under other streams of differently colored grit, to cause said lastmentioned material to adhere to the adhesive coating in other lines or stripes.

13. A method of making roofing elements, which consists in passing a sheet of fibrous material having an adhesive waterproof coating beneath separated streams of crushed mineral material to cause said material to adhere thereto in lines or stripes, then pass-- ing said sheet under other streams of differently colored grit, to cause said lastmentioned material to adhere to the adhesive coating in other lines or stripes, removing the surplus grit, and embedding the remaining grit in the said adhesive coating.

14. A process of making shingle strips which consists in coating an elongated sheet of fibrous waterproof material with a continuous layer of waterproof adhesive, completely' covering the surface of said adhesive with a layer of crushed mineral, embedding said mineral in said adhesive, and severing said'sheet transversely of its length into a plurality of shingle strips whose length is equal to the width of the sheet.

In testimony whereof I have aflixed my signature, in presence of two witnesses.

, FREDERICK C. OVERBURY. Witnesses: I

PETER SEMLER, BENJAMIN HARTMAN- imer-in Letters Patent No. 1,154,334.

Discla 'tudinal stripes of crushed mineral ma face of said foundation, and embeddin MAKING 'RoomNo Disclaimer filed November 22, e 'asslgnee by mesne assignments--The Flint/cote DISCLAIMER.

1,154,334.F'rede1ic/c (7. Overb'ury, Montolair, N. J. M n'rnon OF ELEMENTS. Patent dated Se tember 21-, 191.5. 1919, by the patentee and ti? Company. w Enter this disclaimer Tothat part of the claimin said s ecification' which is in the following words: '1. A method of making roofing e ements which consists in embedding longiterial in the adhesive coating of a sheet of sheet transversely to form strips having said roofing material, and then cutting said stripes crosswise thereon. J

2. A method of making roofing elements, which consists in applying an adhesive to the face of an elongated fibrous sheet, embedding lines of crushed mineral vmaterial in said adhesive to form longitudinal stripes, and then cutting said sheet transversely to form sections of the same width and length.

3. A method of making .roofing elements, which consists in applying an adhesive to the face of an elongated fibrous sheet, embedding lines of crushed mineral material in said adhesive to form longitudinal stripes, and embedding crushed mineral material of another color in the uncoated portions of said adhesive to form intervening bands.

4. A method of making roofing elements, which consists in applying an adhesive to the face of an elongated fibrous sheet, embedding lines of crushed mineral material in said adhesive to form longitudinal stripes, embedding crushed mineral material of anothei color in the uncoated portions of said adhesive to form intervening bands, and cutting said sheet transversely into shingle.

5. A method of making roofing elements, which consists in applying an adhesive to the face of an elongated fibrous sheet, embedding lines of crushed mineral material in said adhesive to form longitudinal stripes, embedding crushed inineral material of another color in the uncoated portions of said adhesive to form intervening bands, and cutting said sheets into sections each having said stripes and bands crosswise of its length.

6. The method ofmaking roofing elements, which consists of moving an elongated sheet of fibrous material lengthwise, applying thereto a coating of waterproof adhesive substance, passing a material to cause said material to adhere in s pressing said material into the said coating, mto sections. 7. The method of making roofing elements, which consists of moving an elongated sheet of fibrous material len thwise, applying thereto a coating of waterproof adhesive substance, passing said s eet under separated streams of crushed mineral tripes to said adhesive substance, and then cutting said sheet transversely material to cause said material to adhere in stripes to said adhesive substance, then passing said sheet through .a shower of crushed mineral material of a different color to cause said material to adhere to' said coating between said stripes, and removing, the surplus crushed mineral material.

8. The method of making roofing elements, which consists of moving an elongated sheet of fibrous material len thwise, applying thereto a coating of waterproof adhesive substance, passing said 5 eet under separated streams of crushed mineral material to cause said material to adhere in stripes to said adhesive substance, then passing said sheet through a shower of crushed mineral material of a different color to cause said material to adhere to sa1d coating between said stripes, and then severing said sheet crosswise into sections of substantially the same length and width.

9. A method of making waterproof roofing, which consists of applying a waterproof adhesive to the face of a fibrous sheet, passing said sheet under separated streams of crushed mineral material to cause said material to adhere in lines to the said material in the adhesive coating.

12. A. method of making roofing e ments, which consists in passing a sheet of fibrous material having an adhesive waterproof coating beneath separated streams of crushed mineral material to cause sai material to adhere thereto in lines or stripes, and then passing said sheet under other streams to cause said last-mentioned materlal to adhere to the lines or stri es.

13. A nd ethod of making roofing adhesive coating in other elements, which consists in passing a sheet of fibrous material having an adhesive watepproof coating beneath separated streams material to adhere thereto in lines or i stripes, then passing said sheet under other streams of differently colored grit, to

of crushed mineral material to cause sai cause said last-mentioned material to adhere to the adhesive coating in other lines or strlpes, removing the surplus grit, and embedding the remaining grit in the said I .adhesive coating.

[Ofiicial Gazette December 2, 11.9.]

said sheet under separated streams of crushed mineral of differently colored grit,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2661303 *Apr 7, 1950Dec 1, 1953Carey Philip Mfg CoMethod of coating roofing material
US4900589 *Sep 7, 1988Feb 13, 1990Gaf Building Materials CorporationGranule application device and process
US5369929 *Feb 1, 1994Dec 6, 1994Elk Corporation Of DallasLaminated roofing shingle
US5380552 *Aug 24, 1992Jan 10, 1995Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMethod of improving adhesion between roofing granules and asphalt-based roofing materials
US5426902 *Jun 10, 1991Jun 27, 1995Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US5516573 *Sep 26, 1994May 14, 1996Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyRoofing materials having a thermoplastic adhesive intergace between coating asphalt and roffing granules
US5611186 *Nov 30, 1994Mar 18, 1997Elk Corporation Of DallasLaminated roofing shingle
US5624522 *Jun 7, 1995Apr 29, 1997Owens-Corning Fiberglas Technology Inc.Method for applying granules to strip asphaltic roofing material to form variegated shingles
US5660014 *Feb 10, 1995Aug 26, 1997Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US5666776 *Aug 30, 1995Sep 16, 1997Elk Corporation Of DallasLaminated roofing shingle
US5746830 *Jul 17, 1996May 5, 1998Owens-Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Pneumatic granule blender for asphalt shingles
US5747105 *Apr 30, 1996May 5, 1998Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology Inc.Traversing nozzle for applying granules to an asphalt coated sheet
US5901517 *May 9, 1997May 11, 1999Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6190754Dec 24, 1997Feb 20, 2001Building Materials Corporation Of AmericaVariegated shingle and method of manufacture
US6195951Nov 17, 1998Mar 6, 2001Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6305138Oct 18, 2000Oct 23, 2001Certainteed Corp.Composite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6426309Dec 30, 1998Jul 30, 2002Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Storm proof roofing material
US6523316Oct 23, 2001Feb 25, 2003CertainteedComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6709994Jan 22, 2002Mar 23, 2004Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Storm proof roofing material
Classifications
U.S. Classification427/187, 427/286, 427/188, 101/424.2
Cooperative ClassificationD06N5/00, E04D2001/005