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Publication numberUS1156074 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 12, 1915
Filing dateOct 8, 1914
Priority dateOct 8, 1914
Publication numberUS 1156074 A, US 1156074A, US-A-1156074, US1156074 A, US1156074A
InventorsJohn N Hahn
Original AssigneeJohn N Hahn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packing-case for fragile articles.
US 1156074 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. N. HAHN.

PACKING CASE FOR FRAGILE ARTICLES.

APPLICATION FILED OCT- 3. I914.

Kul 9 1 2 1 b G 0 d 1 6 t t I J H I e m P o I x m 4 m m." 2 "m m a. m h 4 n" m v a a W/ T/VESS A TTOR/VEV PACKING-CASE FOR FRAGILE ARTICLES.

Specification of Letters Patent. Pate t d g t 12; 1915 Application time October a, 1914. Serial No. 865,611.

To all whom it may concern: 1

Be it known that 1, JOHN N. HAHN, a citizen of the United States, residing at Cleveland, in the county of Ouyahoga and State of Ohio, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Packing-Cases for Fragile Articles, of which the following is a specification.

This invention pertains to an improvement in packing cases for fragile articles, such, especially, as glass or porcelain globes, and the invention consists m a case made, preferably, of suitably heavy corrugated paper or paper board of a standard and accepted grade which meets the regulations of railroads for shipping purposes, and, in the example of case shown in the drawings, has two so-called trays by which the globe is supported in the case. These also, in the style herein shown, 'are of somewhat different construction though not necessarily in all cases, as will hereinafter more clearly apear.

P In the accom anying drawings, Figure 1 is a sectional e evation of the case, box or receptacle on a line corresponding to 1-2, Fig. 3, and Fig. 2 is a like elevation on a line corresponding to line 2-1, Fig. 3. Fig. 3 is a cross section or plan on line 33 Fig. 1, and Fig. 4is a perspective view of the lower or bottom supporting tray. Fig. 5 is a reduced plan view of the top tray or support.

The case or box proper is indicated ,by C, and as already stated, is preferably and usually made of a suitable grade of fairly stifi corrugated paper board, which combines lightness with strength adapted to withstand packing and'shipping. Inthe present views, this article is shown as rectangular in cross section and has folding end flaps 2 which meet at the center, so that the said trays and ,the globes G therein can be inserted in the most convenient ways at the ends of the case. Of course the case might be made with a permanently closed bottom and an open top, but the present construction isdeemed best for several reasons and particularly for convenience in placing the comparatively fitting trays D and E in the respective ends thereof. The

said trays or members D and E. are alike but with this difference, that-the wings 3 in tray D are shown as considerably wider than the wings 4 in tray E. These difierences, however, are marginal, and in either case need have only such depth as to positively hold o'r carry the globe out of possible contact with either the top or the bottom of the receptacle and thus avoid danger of break age by end thrusts. Possibly, in the present showing the depth of both said members is more than is actually'required, both said members are supposed to afford a very positive support for the globe in about the position thereof shown and without any material yield thereof either way notwith-,.

standing the support afl'orded at both ends is also resilient enough to prevent pos- 'sible breakage in the globe however handled in the shipping, assuming that ordinary precautioii or care is exercised. Thus, the upper tray D has not only the four wings 3 at its four sides adapted to be turned to right angles into supporting position in the wall of the case C, but it has also a series of radially disposed tapered spurs or tongues 5 extending inward to nearly the middle thereof from a. circular crease at the base of said spurs, the .said crease being in the upper side so as to permit said globe and stand, say, as seen in Figs. 1 and 2 in supporting relations to the globe. Thesaid crease as to-each spur being a portion of a complete circle or a segmentithereof the shoulders of revent' possible injury or breakage in hanling and shipping as wellas preventing breakage from direct end thrust. It will be noticed, also, that the point of "contact of the said spurs 5 with the globe is near their base where the resistance is greatest, and the 'said'tray has a border 6 inside all around from which the spurs project toward the center on radial lines.

A somewhat similar construction obtains in Figs.'3, and 4 in the tray E. Thus, the said tray has spurs 6. struck radially from segmental creases at their base in the border I) and a series of radial tapered anels or supports 7 between said border an the center 8. The said center and panels are integral with said border, and the panels alter nate with the said spurs and correspond thereto in radial disposition, shape and size, or approximately in the present showing, the object being to have a strong bottom sup port for the globe and side brace or studs adapted to confine the globe atits base and i hold it from sliding laterally. The said spurs when bent to upright position become; fairly rigid on account of the shoulders in ment needed.

' sibly press through so as to strike the lids or carry the As to the segmental creases at the base of the spurs 7, it should be understood that the stock is not creased between said spurs across the panels 7 but only at the base of the spurs, and the said creases are in the top side,necessarily. It will be seen, also, that if the box or case be inverted so that the-top really becomes the bottom for the time being and the weight of the globe comes on the spurs 5, the said spurs have sufiicient strength to lobe because the circle on which the crease is struck at the base of said spurs is narrower than the full top width of the globe, andthe globe therefore rests on the base portions of said spurs and cannot posflaps 2 of the box. It follows that by providing a supporting tray or trays with spurs struck up in this way the endw ise thrust or weight of the globe is taken care-of and no additional. precautions are required. Ihe borders 1) and b are of such width as will keep the globe sufliciently apart from the 'wall of the box and the present globe Grv has a flange 9 about its bottom opening on which it rests. Of course I do not mean to limit the invention to the accommodation of only tk is particular style of globe because the "same principle of construction can be em- 3 loyed with globes-of other shape and of dif provide for the globe, but it also occurs that I globes or articles of diflerent or smaller width and of difierent shape will be shipped in this receptacle of a suitable size, lar er or smaller. In such case the article may e too 1,156,074 y y I small to infringe on said base edge of the spurs and will be held only by the spurs with such spring or resilient support as they may aflord. Hence, the relation between the open spurs 5 and the folded top as shown with the points or ends of the spurs in contact with said top. Usually the said spurs are supposed to sustain about the relation shown when they are in use, and if they were open a less distance they still would come into end contact with the top of the box if the box were inverted and the weight of the contents rest on the said spurs. Of course, it is understood that when the box is occupied for shipping,'the flaps at both ends are closed and held down or sealed by any suitable means, so that it may occur in shipping that the top of the box will be down although this is not deemed to be the best way. The side wings 3 rest against the base of said flaps.

By extending the several radial openings 0 from which the spurs are cut to the base of the spurs and having comparatively narrow strips 7 between said opening the top of the tray E is given the character of a spring support for the article carried thereon and of course I can carry articles or globes varying considerably in size on a bottom like this because the total support of the strips or arms 7 will readily sustain the load while the spurs can be turned to any desired in ward inclination to engage and hold considerably smaller globes than the extreme or maximum size shown herein. .If the globe were half as wide it would be inclined accordingly and would afl'ord all the lateral support necessary as well as a resilient base support.

By the foregoing constructi'ons of the two trays, a spring engagement is provided for both. ends of the globe and the box can ride on either end with perfect safety to the contents. However in all shippings the boxes are supposed to be placed on board or in storage with the bottom proper downward.

What I. claim is:

1. Afshipping box for globes or shades comprising the combination .of a case having its side walls spaced to clear the globe or shade and having end closures spaced to clear the globe or shade and two marginally flanged 'trays independent'of the case and withdrawable therefrom and therein and'spaced to engage the globe or shade and hold it clear .of the case and each having its entire flange fitting inside the case and contacting with a case closure and whereof one tray is provided with a circular row of inwardly extending fingers adapted to constitute a' concave seat arranged between the tray and the adjacent case closure for the reception of one end ofthe globe or shade, and whereof the other tray is provided with a group of spaced tongues and with a solid center part adaptedto overinsertible lie the other end of the globe or shade with the tongues in engagement with the curved wall of the shade or globe.

2. A shipping box for globes or shades comprising the combination of a knockdown corrugated strawboa'rd'. case having its side walls spaced to clear the globe or shade and having and closures spaced .to clear the globe or shade, and two marginally flanged detachable trays spaced to engage the globe or shade and holdit clear of the case and each having its'entire flange -fitting inside the case and vcontacting. with a case closure and whereof 'one tray is provided with a circular row of inwardly extending fingers adapted to constitute a concave seat arranged betweenithe tray and the adjacent case closure for. the reception of one end of the globe or. shade, and whereof the other tray is provided with, a group of spaced tongues and is adapted to overlie the other end of the globe or shade with the tongues 1n engagement withv the curved wall of the shade or globe.

3. A shipping box'for globes 01'. shades comprising the combination'of. a case having its side walls spaced to clear the globe the globe or shade, and two marginallyflanged trays spaced to engage the globe or shade andshold it clearof'the case and each having its flange fitting inside the case and contacting with. a case closure and whereof one tray is provided with a circular row of inwardly extending fingers-adapted to constitute a concave seat arranged between the tray and the adjacent case closure for the reception of one end of the globe or shade, and whereof the other tray is provided with a group of spaced tongues and is adapted to overlie the other end of the globe or shade with the tongues in engagement with the curved wall of the shade 0 lobe, substantially as described. i

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

' JOHN N. HAHN.

Witnesses:

. H. T. 'FIsHnR,

M. SCHWAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2445280 *Apr 30, 1945Jul 13, 1948Morris Paper MillsShipping and display carton
US2674206 *Sep 27, 1948Apr 6, 1954Tote Engineering IncShoring construction
US2690947 *Dec 12, 1951Oct 5, 1954Nosco PlasticsSpark plug container
US2760631 *Oct 30, 1952Aug 28, 1956Celanese ColombianaContainer
US2837624 *Apr 12, 1955Jun 3, 1958Kay Mfg Co IncVaporizer
US2868428 *Jun 1, 1955Jan 13, 1959Continental Can CoBottle shipping container with internal yieldable supports
US2936880 *Oct 6, 1958May 17, 1960Crown Zellerbach CorpPositioning and retaining member
US2945585 *Nov 1, 1957Jul 19, 1960French John HTubular container
US2997164 *Nov 24, 1958Aug 22, 1961West Virginia Pulp & Paper ComContainer for packaging grinding wheels
US3093240 *May 15, 1961Jun 11, 1963Owens Illinois Glass CoDisplay shipper
US3335849 *Oct 9, 1964Aug 15, 1967Collin Herbert SPacking device for washing machines
US3929225 *Dec 9, 1974Dec 30, 1975Hoerner Waldorf CorpShort bicycle pack
US4280622 *Dec 12, 1979Jul 28, 1981Container Corporation Of AmericaTapered insert
US4285432 *Dec 7, 1978Aug 25, 1981Gestion Paul De Villers, Inc.Package arrangement for fragile articles
US4291803 *Sep 23, 1980Sep 29, 1981Windsor Communications Group, Inc.Protective end cap
US4375261 *Mar 16, 1981Mar 1, 1983Union Camp CorporationPad and blank therefor to support an object in a shipping container
US5060798 *Mar 4, 1991Oct 29, 1991Braastad Kenneth APaperboard holder for flower vases and the like
US5462171 *Mar 18, 1994Oct 31, 1995The Timken CompanyShock-absorbing package
US5896991 *Aug 12, 1997Apr 27, 1999Mattel, Inc.Blister card package for holding and displaying small items
US7959345 *Aug 10, 2007Jun 14, 2011Valspar Sourcing, Inc.System for securing a container within a mixing machine
US20090040865 *Aug 10, 2007Feb 12, 2009Valspar Sourcing, Inc.System for securing a container within a mixing machine
US20140209773 *Jan 25, 2014Jul 31, 2014Brian Lawrence DorrTank holder
WO1999007619A1May 27, 1998Feb 18, 1999Mattel, Inc.Blister card package for holding and displaying small items
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/594, 206/482
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/5035