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Publication numberUS1160028 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 9, 1915
Filing dateMar 6, 1915
Priority dateMar 6, 1915
Publication numberUS 1160028 A, US 1160028A, US-A-1160028, US1160028 A, US1160028A
InventorsJohn T Wright
Original AssigneeJohn T Wright
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Valve for internal-combustion engines.
US 1160028 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. T. WRIGHT. VALVE FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES.

APPLlCATlON FILED MAR. 6.1915.

Patented Nov. 9, 1915.

u uc u to;

w vtm'zows JOHN T. WRIGHT, 9F

7 WASHINGTON, DISTRICT OF comps/ram- VALVE FOR INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES.

Specification of Letters Patent.

, Application filed MarchG, 1915. Serial No. 12,586.

To all whom it may concern: I

Be it known that I, JOHN T. WRIGHT, a citizen of the United States, residing at Washington, in the District of Columbia, have invented new and useful Improvements in Valves for Internal-CombustionEngines,

of which the following is a specification.

This invention'relates to valves for internal combustion engines, the object of the inventionbeing to produce what I term a non-carbonizing valve or, in other words, a Valve which, in cooperation with the valve seat, will automatically loosen, clear away and remove any particles of carbon adhering either to the Working face of the valve or valve seat, said removed particles being immediately carried outward to the atmosphere through the exhaust.

With the above and other objects in View, the invention consists in the novel construction, combination and arrangement of parts, as herein described, illustrated and claimed.

In the accompanying drawings :Figure 1 is a vertical sectional view of a sufficient portion of the cylinder of an internal combustion engine to illustrate the application ofthe present invention thereto. Fig. 2 is a detail side elevation of the valve v stem guide. F ig. 3 is a cross section on the line 3'-3 of Fig. 1. Fig. 4 is a bottom of the valve and valve seat. Fig. 5 is a fragmentary top plan view of the same.

1 designates the cylinder-of an internal combustion engine, 2 the valve chamber thereof and 3 the water jacket. 4 represents either the intake or exhaust passage leading to or from the valve chamber 2 and 5 designates the usual threaded plug for closing the opening, in the top of, the valve chamber through which the valve shown at 6 is removable. v

The'valve 6 is provided with a stem 7 which extends through a guide 8 threaded in an opening 9 in line with the valve opening, the stem 7 passing through the guide 8 and the valve 6 being yieldingly pressed toward and against its expansion spring 10 which is interposed between 2. flange on the guide 8 and a remov- 0 Jable cup. 11 detachably secured to the stem 7 by means of'a'key 12 engaging an annular groove 13 in said stem.

The main feature of this invention resides in the valve and valve seat together with the means for imparting a slight turning movement back and forth to the valve it may be removed and plan View seat by means of a helical" Patented Nov. 9, 191-5.

body as it moves toward and away from the Valve seat. ment of this invention, the valve seat indicated at 14 may be separate from the engine casting as shown in Fig. threaded therein as at 15 so that when worn replaced by a new valve seat. Any desired means may be employed for fastening the valve seat 14 in place J v 1 The working face of the valve 6 is generally frusto-conical similar tothe valves now in common use in internal combustion engines, differing therefrom, however, in that saidv working face is provided with an annular series of obliquely inclined teeth 16 which closely intermesh with corresponding teeth 17 on the working face of the valve seat 14. The teeth 16 and 17 which are pitched obliquely with respect to the teeth of the working face ofv the valve 6 and the working face of the valve seat, are preferablywider at the topas shown in Fig. 5 than at the bottom as shown in Fig. 4. The intermeshing teeth are therefore tapering or of greatly reduced size from the outer or Wider part of the Working face ofthe valve or,.in other Words, that part which is of greatest diameter toward the part of the Working face'which is of the smallest diameter. The teeth therefore have a Wedging action relatively to each other so as to effectually dislodge any particles 'of carbon adhering to the working faces of the valve and valve seat. In order to insure the accurate meshing of the teeth 16 and 17, the stem 7 of the valve is provided with .an outwardly pro "jecting pin 18 which works in an oblique or spiral slot 19 in the valve guide 8, sald slot being best lation of thepin 18 to said slot being clearly indicated in Figs. 1 and 3. The angle or pitch of the slot 9 is the same as the angle or pitch of the teeth 16 and 17. This lnsures the return of the teeth 16 into proper relation to the teeth 17 each time that thevalve is lifted from its seat by the usual camshaft (not shown).

From the foregoing it will now be understood that as the cam shaft acts on the stem 7 to unseat the-valve 6, the stem and valve are given a slight rota; tive movement by reason of the cooperation of the teeth 16 with the teeth'll and also by illustrated in Fig. 2 and the redescription, taken in. connection with the accompanying drawmgs,

In the preferred embodireason of the cooperation of the pin 18 with the slot 19. As soon as the unseating pressure' is relieved on the valve stem 7, the

spring returns the valve to its seat and.

the stem and valve are given a partial rotative movement, in the opposite direction by the cooperation of the pin 18 and slot 19. Any particles of carbon which may have lodged between the teeth 16 or 17 are thus 10 \removed or dislodged as the teeth 16 and 17 .come into close mesh with each other each 1. In an internal combustion engine, a

time the valve is returned to its seat.

V What I claim is valve the working face of-which is provided with teeth, and a valve seat theworking face of which is provided with corresponding teeth with which the "aforesaid teeth mesh.

2. In an internal combustion engine, a

valve theworking face of which is provided with inclined teeth, and a valve seat the working face of which is provided with corresponding inclined teeth with which the aforesaid teeth mesh.

3. In an internal combustion engine, a

valve the working face of which is provided with obliquely dlsposed teeth, and a valve seat the working face of which is provided with corresponding obliquely disposed teeth with which the aforesaid teeth mesh.

4. In an internal combustion engine, a valve the workingface of which is provided with tapering teeth, and a valve seat the workin face of which is provided with cor- I respon ing tapering teeth with which the aforesaid teeth mesh.

5. In an internal combustion engine, a

valve the-working face of which is providedwith obliquely disposed teeth, a valve seat the working face of which is provided with corresponding obliquely disposed teeth w1th which the aforesaid teeth mesh, and means for oscillating said valve in moving toward and away from its seat.

7 In an lnternal combustion engine, a

valve the working face of which is provided with teeth, and a detachable valve seat of softer metal than the valve, the working face of which is provided with corresponding teethwith which the aforesaid teeth mesh.

.In testimony whereof I aflixmy signature in presence of two witnesses.

. JOHN T.- WRIGHT.

Witnesses: i

EVELYN PRATHER, BENNETT S. JoNEs.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2574120 *Jun 17, 1946Nov 6, 1951Rich Mfg CorpPoppet valve assembly
US2590719 *May 3, 1949Mar 25, 1952Ford Motor CoRotation permitting assembly for poppet valves
US2647501 *Sep 22, 1947Aug 4, 1953Rich Mfg CorpValve assembly
US2668604 *Jan 8, 1947Feb 9, 1954Houdaille Hershey CorpTelescopic shock absorber piston construction
US3090370 *Apr 4, 1962May 21, 1963Harold W KimballCombustion engine valve
US4309966 *Mar 20, 1980Jan 12, 1982General Motors CorporationEccentric, oscillating intake valve
US5950989 *Apr 16, 1998Sep 14, 1999Caterpillar Inc.Valve interface having mismatched radii
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/188.8, 137/242, 251/216, 123/90.28
Cooperative ClassificationF01L3/22