Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1170448 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 1, 1916
Filing dateJun 6, 1912
Priority dateJun 6, 1912
Publication numberUS 1170448 A, US 1170448A, US-A-1170448, US1170448 A, US1170448A
InventorsVictor H Jennings
Original AssigneeMills Woven Cartridge Belt Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Woven receptacle and method of producing the same.
US 1170448 A
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

V. H. JENN|NGS.

WOVEN RECEPTACLE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME.

* APPLICATION FILED JUNE 5. 1912. Patented Feb. 1

. a c 1F H 1...: J VIVAMWJIF, 4 k %AWWW 6 H x i w WW I Invqnor:

o arn ey ms COLUMBIA PLAIIIOGRAPH co WASHINGTON, n. c.

V. H. JENNINGS.

WOVEN RECEPTACLE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME.

APPLICATION FILED JUNE 6. 1912.

Patented Feb. 1, 1916.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

Wv'tness es.-

' Inventor.-

C/QW 5am @JXW THE COLUMBIA PLANOGRAPH c0., WASHINGTON, D. c.

V. H. JENNINGS.

WOVEN RECEPTACLE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME.

APPLICATION FILED JUNE 6| 1912;

Patentd Fehl, 1916.

4 SHEETSSHEET 3- :2 War/7265565.-

5 1m 22 9am mentor.-

THE COLUMBM PLANOGRAPH co., WASHINGTON, D. c.

V. H. JENNINGS.

WOVEN RECEPTACLE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME.

APPLICATION FILED JUNE 6,1912.

Patented Feb. 1, 1 916.

4 SHEETSSHEET 4.

fnvenzfar:

w @4660 rney.

This COLUMBIA FLANOGRAPH co., WASHINGTON. n. c;

'm'rnn s'ra rns ra'rnnr @FFFCE.

VICTOR H. JENNINGS, 0F WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR TO MILLS WOVEN CARTRIDGE BELT COMPANY, OF WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS, A CORPORATION OF MASSACHUSETTS.

1,17OAL48.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Feb. 1, min.

Application filed. June 6, 1912. Serial No. 702,034.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Vrcron H. JENNINGS, a citizen of the United States, residing at Worcester, in the county of Worcester, State of Massachusetts, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Woven Receptacles and Methods of Producing the Same, of which the following is a specification, reference being bad therein to the ac companying drawings. a

The invention comprises improvements in receptacles woven in seamless pouch or bag form. The invention provides for spacing the sides apart and shaping or squaring the ends and bottom of a receptacle of the said class, or either the ends or the bottom, as well as for reinforcement thereof; and 1n addition thereto for furnishing the recep-" tacle with an integrally-connected cover or flap.

The drawings illustrate the various tures of the invention.

In the drawings,Figure 1 is an isometric view of a finished receptacle embodying the improvements therein. Fig. 2 is a View of the said receptacle in vertical cross-section on line 2, 2, of Fig. 1. Fig. 2, Sheet 8, is a section at right angles to Fig. 2. Fig. 5 is view in horizontal crosssection on line 3, 3, of Fig. 1. Fig. i is a view of the receptacle of Fig. 1, before being turned inside out. Fig. 5 is a view showing a portion of the web woven for use in making receptacles like that of Figs. 1 to 1. Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic view in section of a receptacle-blank cut from the web of F 5. Figs. 7, S and 9 are views in section on lines 7, 7 ,8, 8; and 9, 9, of Fig. 5. of a slightlyanodified receptacle.

fea- Fig. 11

shows a modified form of web. Fig. 12 is a diagrammatic view in section of the web shown in Fig. 11. Fig. 13 a sectional detail view of'a receptacle made from theweb of Fig. 11. Fig.1et is. a view in vertical section corresponding with Fig. 2, showing an additional reinforcement introduced between the two layers forming the double bottom of the receptacle. Fig; 15 is a view in horizontal section correspondingwith Fig.

3, showing an additional reinforcement between the two layers ofeach double end of Fig. 10 is an isometric view the receptacle. Figs. 16 and 17 are views in horizontal section showing another way of producing a woven receptacle and its in tegral end reinforcements, and Figs. 18 and 19 are views in vertical section showing a woven receptacle similarly produced with a bottom reinforcement.

Referring first to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the seamless woven pouch or baglike body of the receptacle shown in such figures is squared or rectangular in cross-section. It comprises a front side or face a, a rear side or backb, opposite ends 0, c, and a bottom (Z. A cover or flap is shown at e woven in con nection with the rear side Z). Ball and socket fastenings of ordinary type are shown at f, g, applied to the front side a and the cover or flap e, to serve in securing the latter in place when closed down over the open top or mouth of the receptacle. The ends 0, 0, are constituted by the squared seamless closed end-portions of thepouch or bag.

The bottom (Z is constituted by the squared seamless closed bottom-portion of said pouch or bag. At h, h, Figs. 1 and 3, are reinforcing and end-squaring thicknesses in connection with the said ends 0, c,- and at i, Fig. 2, is a reinforcing and bottomsquaring thickness in connection with the said bottom (Z. The said reinforcing and squaring thicknesses space the sides of the receptacle apart and give it a rectangular shape in cross-section. A receptacle embodying the features shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 therefore is preferable as regards appearances, and for other reasons, to a receptacle having ends and a bottom which normally collapse, and which bulge or sagunder the pressure or weight of the contents of the receptacle. The said receptacle is especially adapted to receive and neatly and snugly fit and cover a rectangular package which just fills it.

I have shown two different ways of carrying my invention into effect, in each of which I produce by weaving a continuous web or fabric comprising a succession of receptacle-lengths, and which I. cut or divide transversely into separate blanks, each suitable for the production of a receptacle. In the first of such ways, illustratedin Figs. 5 to 9,1;he continuous vwebor fabric is woven with the openings or mouths of successive pouches or bags facing one edge of the web or fabric, and the closed-bottoms thereof facing the other edge, and with the lines on which the ends of the pouches or bags are closed extending transversely of the web or fabric. The web or fabric of Figs. 5 to 9 is woven in three plies, namely a, b, and 6, one above another. The ply a is for the face or front of each pouch or bag, the ply b for the back or rear side thereof, and the-ply e for the cover or flap.

The plies a, Z), are woven together lengthwise of the web or fabric along the line a9, Figs. 5 and 7, adjacent one edge of the web or fabric, to form the closed bottom of a pouch or bag. They are unconnected at the opposite edge of the web or fabric, to form the opening or mouth of the pouch or bag.

They are woven together transversely of the web 011 the lines a a Fig. 6, to close the ends of the pouch or bag. The cover or flap ply e is connected in the weaving with the ply Z) at the mouth of the pouch or bag, as shown at the left in Fig. 7, from one line of closing a to the other.

To provide for the end reinforcements 71,, it, Figs. 1 and 3, the plies a, Z), are woven in the form of continuations h, h, Figs. 5 and 6, beyond the lines of closing (4 a the said continuationsbeing utilized as presently will be explained. To provide for the bottom reinforcement a, Fig. 2, the

plies a, b, are extended laterally beyond the line of union a in the form of two longitudinal strips 2' 1?, Figs. 5 and 7 corresponding in length to the distance between the two transverse closing lines a (L The said strips are utilized as presently will be explained.

In weaving the web of Figs. 5 to 9 in a single-shuttle loom, the warp-threads and weft or filling may be interwoven as in Fig. 7, throughout the lengthof a pouch or bag, intermediate the lines a a Fig. 6, on which the sides of the pouch or bag are united to close the ends of the pouch or bag. In Fig. 7, the weft or filling is shown as passing from left to right through the ply a to the point of; then passing up to the ply Z) and passing to the right in the upper strip 71 then passing from right to left back through "said strip, and through the ply b to the left-hand edge of the web; then passing from left to right through ply 6 then returning from right to left through said ply 6; then back from left to right through ply b to point (4 and then in the same direction through lower strip 2' then from rlght' to left back through the said lower strip 2' and the ply a to the left-hand edge of the web, to a point adjacent the starting point, thereby finishing one round in the weaving. The edge of face ply (t at the mouth or opening of the pouch or bag is a ply a to ply Z2, and vice versa. In weaving the portion of web containing extensions h, h, the weft or filling'is interwoven with the warp-threads as in Fig. 8. Starting, for instance, at the left-hand edge of the web in Fig. 8, the Weft or filling extends from left to right through the ply a. to the point a then passing from ply a. to ply Z) itextends from right to left through ply'b to the left-handedge of the web; then it returns from left to right through ply b to point a then passing from ply Z) to ply a, it extends through ply a? from right to left, to a point adjacent the starting point. In order to weave the cover or flap ply 6 with practically perfect selvages at both edges thereof in this portion of the web or fabric, using only, a single shuttle for all three plies, the weft or filling is passed from ply b to ply eat the righthand side of the web, as at 6 Figs. 5 and 8, at intervals in the weaving of ply b, and extends back and forth within ply e for four or more picks, interweaving with the warp threads of such ply to form the latter, and then returning to ply Z) after, say, the fourth pick, and interweaving again with the warp-threads of the respective plies b and a a number of picks before again returning to plye. The result of this is indicated inFig. 5, in which the connecting portions of weft or filling alternate in the selvage of ply 6 with portions of such selvage which are bound by return-bends of the weft or filling woven into such ply. In this portion of the web the weft or filling does not interweave with the warp-threads pertaining to the longitudinal strips 2' 2' and the continuations 72/, h, of the plies a, b, the weft or filling is interwoven with the warp-threads of the cover or flap ply e, as shown in Fig. 9, to form that portion of the same extending between one pouch or bag and the next in the web. or fabric. Plye is continuous, as shown in Fig. 5, and the portion of the same intermediate one pouch or bag and the next is sufficient to provide for the turning back and under of the raw or cut ends of the cover or flap against the main portion ofthe latter, as hereinafter explained, in finishing the cover orflap. Between the continuations 72/, h, of plies a, b,

at the end of one. pouch-length or baglength and the corresponding continuations at the beginning of the next length the warpextensions are not required to have a length as great as the projecting end-portions of the cover or flap. Between the end of the longitudinal strips 2' d of one receptacle-length and the beginning of the corresponding strips of the next receptacle-length, the warps of such strips similarly float without being interwoven with weft, as in Figs. 5, 8 and 9.

The web woven as represented inFig. 5, and containing any required number of receptacle-lengths is divided up into blanks, each of a length suitable for a receptacle, by cutting across the ply e and the floated warp-threads of the other two plies, on the transverse lines 9, 9, Fig. 5, intermediate successive pouches or bags. A length or blank thus separated from the web is-represented in longitudinal section in Fig. 6. In such blank the cover or flap is integrally joined to the top edge of the back or rear side of the receptacle from one line of union 1 or closing a to the other, andend-portions thereof project beyond the closed ends of the receptacle. These projecting end-portions are selvaged at both the upper and lower edges thereof. The short loose portions 6 6 Fig. 5, of welt or filling which connect the lower edges of such projecting end-portions to the lower portions of the extensions h, i are cut in order to free the lower edges of the cover or flap, and are then trimmed away. The said end-portions then are folded back upon the adjoining portions of the cover or flap, the raw or cut edges are turned under, and the folded back portions are stitched in place as shown in Figs. 1 and 4:. Each end of the receptacle is finished by turning the extensions h, 72., at such end back in opposite directions against the adjoiningportions of the side-plies, and securing them to such portions by vertical and transverse lines of stitches 7L 7L2, 71. k Figs. 1 and l. The

bottom is finished by turning the strips i 21 back in opposite directions against the adjoinin portions of the side-plies, and securing them to such portions by lines of stitches i 2' extending lengthwise of the receptacle, and also across the bottom near the ends of the receptacle. The lower corners are finished by transverse lines of stitches 70, la, through the corner-portions of the pouch or bag and the projecting endportions of the extensions 72 h and strips i 27 The receptacle is then in the shape and condition represented in Fig. 4, with the portions thus fastened together at the said corners projecting as shown. It is turned inside out, and the result is shown in Fig. 1. he bottom reinforce z, constituted by the longitudinal strips 2' 2' fixes the length of the receptacle, and gives shape to the receptacle at the bottom of the latter and determines the transverse diameter &

thereof at the bottom, by squaring the bot tom and holding the sides apart at the bottom. The corner-projections 7c, is, now turned inwardly contribute to keeping the width of the bottom and maintaining the shape of the lower corners. The end-reinforces it, h, constituted by the vertical endextensions It, it, give shape to the receptacle at the ends of the latter, and fix the depth of the receptacle, and its internal diameter at the ends by squaring the said ends and holding the sides apart at the ends. In consequence of the end-portions of the flap or cover being joined to the ends of the receptacle and extending half-way forward. from the back,.the top of the receptacle thereby is more effectually closed, and its contents better protected, when the cover or flap is turned down and secured in place. The fastenings f, g, may be applied either before or after turning the receptacle inside out.

Fig. 10 shows a receptacle modified in respect of the end-portions e, e, of the cover or flap 6*. In this modification the said end-portions do not extend partway forward upon the ends of the receptacle, as

in Figs. 1 and 4-, but project in line with the rear side, with the extremities of such end-portions simply folded back, their cut edges turned under, and stitched in place. The cover or flap is longer than the receptacle. so that said end-portions project beyond the ends of the receptacle, to more effectually close the opening and protect the contents. In weaving the receptacle of Fig. 10,1 weave the cover or flap ply joined continuously to the rear side of the receptacle only for a distance corresponding with the length of the finished receptacle, namely from point m to point m. In weaving, the web or cover or flap is woven as a distinct ply from either point an to the end of the adjacent extensions 72,, it, save for connection at intervals with the top edge of the said rear side by portions 6 of weft or filling, at points where the weft or filling is transferred to and from the cover or flap ply in weaving portions thereof in alternation with portions in the other two plies, as already explained with reference to Figs. 5 and 8.

In the second way of carrying my invention into effect, illustrated in Figs. 11 and 12, the continuous web or fabric is woven with the openings ormouths of successive pouches or bags extending transversely of said web or fabric, and the closed bottoms also extending transversely thereof, with the lines on which the ends of the pouches or bags are closed extending longitudinally of the web or fabric. The web or fabric of Figs. 11 and 12 is woven in two plies, one above the other. At i i Fig. 11, the two plies constitute the reinforcing portions for the bottom of a receptacle. Succeeding the production of such portions, the two plies are woven together at a to form the line of closing or union for the bottom of the-receptacle. Next the two plies are Woven of sufficient extent to constitute the two sides a, Z2 of the pouch or bag of the receptacle,

two plies which are entirely unconnected with each other at one margin of the web or fabric, and practically unconnected at the other margin, they being merely connected at intervals by portions of weft or filling 6 extending from one to the other, as described with reference to Figs. 5 and 8. That is to say, the web or fabric being produced with one shuttle, I first weave a number of picks in one of the plies, say four, without weaving in the other ply; I then weave a corresponding number of picks in the latter ply, without weaving in the first ply; 1 then weave said number of picks in the first ply again, and so on. The result is that the portions 2' 2', are produced with perfect selrages at one margin of the web or fabric, andalthough they are joined together by the connecting portions 6 of weft or filling at intervals at the other margin, yet when such portions of weft or filling are cut and trimmed the selvages at such margin are practically as firm and perfect, and are entirely satisfactory. The line a of closing or joining the sides of the pouch orbag together at the bottom of the latter is produced merely by crossing the warp-threads, as at the lines 1 (L in Fig. 6.

The pouch or bag may be woven as in Fig. 12, in which, starting at the point 3 at the left-hand margin of the web or fabric the weft or filling extends toward the right through the lower end-reinforcing strip h for the width of the said reinforcing strip. At the point 4, corresponding with one closed end of the pouch or bag, it passes up into the ply a, and continues to the right in the latter to the point 5, correspoding with the other closed end of the pouch or bag, where it passes down, and continues to the right through the lower end-reinforcing strip it at the right-hand margin of the web or fabric. It then returns from right to left through the said reinforcing strip and the lower ply b to the point a at the left-hand end of the pouch or bag, where it the point 7 where it'pases up into the upper' reinforcing strip 71. at the right-hand side, and continues to the right-hand margin. Returning from right to left through said strip, and the upper ply a to the point 8, it

passes down into the lower reinforcing strip if at the left-hand side, and extends therethrough to the left-hand margin, thereby completing one round. I have shown the cover or flap 6 produced by weaving in the upper ply alone in continuation of the back side of the pouch or bag, until a sufficient length of single-ply fabric for the purposes of a cover or flap has been produced. After said cover or flap portion has been woven, the two bottom-reinforcing plies i i for the next receptacle are woven as before, and so on. In weaving the cover or flap-portion and the said bottom-reinforcing plies (6*, a, the warp-threads of the end-reinforcing strips its, hi float as in Fig. 11, and subsequently are trimmed from the ends of said strips.

The web or fabric produced in the manner last described is divided up into receptaclelengths or blanks by cutting across-the two plies 2' 1' adjacent the end of the cover or flap-portion 6 A short portion of the under ply 2' is left upon the top edge of the pouch or bag, to be folded back with its raw or cut edge turned in, and stitched in place, as at c in Fig. 13, to finish off the said edge. The receptacle is otherwise finished substantially as hereinbefore described. The two ends of the cover or flap portion 6 are selvaged, and consequently do not require to be turned in to conceal raw edges as in the case of the receptacle of Figs. 1 and 4. I contemplate also weaving the cover or flap-portion e in a flat and extended state,

1 with the warp-threads of the opposite ply floated from the top edge of the front side of the pouch or bag to the beginning of the corresponding bottom-reinforcing portion i for the next pouch or bag.

Double bottoms and double end-walls such as shown in Figs. 2 and 3 may be further reinforced if desired, in accordance with one feature of the invention, by inserting between the two bottom-reinforcing plies 2:, 2',

lengths or strips 0, 0, Fig. 2, of reinforclng material of metal, vegetable fiber, etc., andby inserting similar lengths or strips 79, 7), Fig. 3, between the end-reinforcing plies h, h, and the end-walls c, 0.

Figs. 16 and 17 show a different way of producing the woven receptacle and its in tegral end-reinforcements. In Fig. 16 the receptacle is woven with the end-extensions tom by stitches 71.

it it in line with or continuation of the back-wall b and in this instance of greater thickness than said back-wall as a result of interweaving therein the warp-threads of the front-wall a and ends 0 0 in addition to those of the back-wall. In finishing the receptacles the said end-extensions are folded around against the ends c 0 as indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 16, and secured to the said ends by stitches h h. After the bag has been turned inside out, the result is as shown in Fig. 17. The additional reinforcement of Figs. 14 and 15 may be added to the construction shown in Figs. 16 and 17, as will be obvious.

Figs. 18 and 19 show a bottom-reinforcement produced in manner similar to that in which the end-reinforcements of Figs. 16 and 17 are produced, namely, by weaving the receptacle witha bottom-extension i in line *ith the continuation of one of the walls, in this instance the back wall 6 and of greater thickness than said back wall. In finishing the receptacle the said bottomextension is folded around against the bottom of the receptacle, as indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 18, and secured to the said bot- Fig. 19 shows the result after turning the receptacle inside out. The additional reinforcement ofFig. 14 may be added to the construction shown in Figs. 18 and 19.

The improvements in woven receptacleblanks and woven webs, and in the method of weaving, shown and described herein, have been made the subjects of claims in my divisional applications filed, respectively, January 5, 1914, Serial No. 810,355, and January 20, 1914, Serial No. 813,347.

I claim as my invention H 1. A woven receptacle having integral end-reinforcing means which fix the depth of the receptacle and the transverse internal diameter thereof at the ends.

2. A woven receptacle having integral bottom reinforcing means whereby the length ofthe receptacle and the transverse diameter thereof at the bottom are fixed.

3. A woven receptacle having integral endand bottom-reinforcing means which shape said receptacle at its ends and bottom, and fix the length and transverse diameter thereof.

4. A woven receptacle having integrally woven therewith a reinforcing ply extended transversely across an end thereof, whereby the said end is shaped and stiffened and the transverse diameter of the receptacle is fixed.

5. A woven receptacle having integral plies extended beyond the length of the receptacle proper, fastened to the end-walls of the receptacle, and stiffening and shaping the said end-walls.

6. A woven receptacle having integral reinforcement extended from the bottom there of, fastened to said bottom, and stiffening and shaping the said bottom.

' woven receptacle having integral plies extended beyond the length of the receptacle proper,and from the bottom, with the extensions fastened to the end-walls and bottom, respectively, and stiffening and shaping the ends and bottom.

8. A multiple woven fabric receptacle comprising a front side and a rear side woven together at a given point to form a solidly-closed end and beyond such point woven with continuations constituting reinforcing and shaping plies, with the latter extended transversely and attached to the end-wall to stiffen and shape the latter.

9. A woven receptacle having integrally woven end-reinforcing means which fix the distance between its front and back walls.

10. A woven receptacle having integrally woven fabric portions reinforcing its ends. and also having an integrally-woven closing flap or cover of greater length than the receptacle when finished.

11. A woven receptacle having its ends closed in the weaving and stiffened and shaped by reinforcing plies woven in continuation of the said ends, and having an integrally-woven closing fiap or cover therefor of greater length than the length of the receptacle proper.

12. A woven receptacle having integrallywoven end-squaring reinforcements, and also having woven integral with one sidewall of the receptacle and with portions of theend-walls of the finished receptacle a closmg flap or cover of greater length than the receptacle when finished.

13. A woven receptacle having integrallywoven fabric-ply end-extensions, with the latter extended transversely and attached to the end-walls, thereby squaring the ends of the receptacle, and also having a closing flap or cover of greater length than the receptacle when finished, woven integral with one sidewall and portions of the end-walls, and extending forward upon said end-walls.

14. A woven receptacle having front and rear walls, a closing flap, ends closed in the weaving, and end-reinforcing and shaping means, the whole formed of three integrallywoven plies.

15. woven receptacle having an integral ply pro]ecting from a surface thereof, folded against the surface of the receptacle and secured thereto, and reinforcing material inserted between the said wall and such plv and held in place by the latter. u

16. A woven receptacle having an integral ply projecting from an end thereof, folded back against a surface of said end and secured thereto, and reinforcing material in serted between the said end and such ply and held in place by the latte 17. A woven receptacle having the bottom thereof closed in the Weaving, and also In testimony whereof I affix my signature Woven with an integral projecting ply sein presence of two Witnesses. cured against a surface of the receptacle, and I VICTOR H. JENNINGS. reinforcing material inclosed between the Witnesses:

1 5 said surface and said ply and held in place FRANCES R. GoLDsTEIN,

by the latter. Rosa F. WoonoooK.v

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the"Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. C.

It is hereby certified that in Letters Patent No, 1,17 0,448, granted February 1,

1916, upon the application of Victor H. Jennings, of \Vorcester, Massachusetts, for

an improvement in Woven Receptacles and Methods of Producing the Same,

an error appears in the printed specification requiring correction as follows: Page 5, line 74, claim 8, for the Word multiple read multiply; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Ofiice.

Signed and sealed this 29th day of February, A. D., 1916.

[SEAL] R. F. WHITEHEAD,

Acting Commissioner of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4977941 *Mar 19, 1990Dec 18, 1990Henderson Esther LBingo bag with self-supporting vertical wall
US6053570 *May 21, 1998Apr 25, 2000Stern; Cindy JaneDetachable storage device positionable under theater seats
US6389674 *Oct 13, 2000May 21, 2002Tanya L. Beavers-La RueBasket weaving kit and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/86, 383/117
Cooperative ClassificationB65D33/24