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Publication numberUS1170862 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 8, 1916
Filing dateMay 24, 1913
Priority dateMay 24, 1913
Publication numberUS 1170862 A, US 1170862A, US-A-1170862, US1170862 A, US1170862A
InventorsWilliam E Wine
Original AssigneeWilliam E Wine
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Train-stop.
US 1170862 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. E. WINE.

TRAIN STOP. 7 APPLICATION FILED MAY 2'4, 1913.

IN VEN TOR. WITNESSES Patnted Feb. 8,1916.

4 SHEETS-SHEET l.

w. E. WINE.

TRAIN ST OP. APPLICATION FILED MAY 24, 1913- I I I v Q I Patented Feb.-8, 1916.

" 4 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

1 I J 4 I IN VEN TOR.

WITNESSES 'w. E. WINE.

TRAIN STOP. APPLICATION FILED MAY 24, i913.

I 4 SHEETS-SHEET 3- IN VEN TOR.

WITNESSES.- I

dw. may

Patented "Fab. 8; 19 16..

W. E. WINE. mm STOP. APPLICATION FILED MAY 24, I913.

Patent ed Feb. 8; 1916.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 4.

; 'lIIIIlIIlIIII'llIII/l INVENTOR,

WITNESSES.-

" UNITED sTArEs PATENT ora on.

WILLIAM E. WINE, OF WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA.'

To all whom it may concern:

' Be it known that 1, WILLIAM -E. WINE, a

citizen of 'the J-United States, residing at Wilmington, in the county of New Hanover and State oLNorth-Carolina, have invented certain new and useful Improvements 1n Train-Stops, of which the following is a hereof.

specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part My invention relates to improvements in train stopping and controlling devices, wherein a moving .train may be brought to astop without the-assistance of the eng1ne-. man. Brakeoperating devices of this character employelectrically operated and other delicately constructed mechanisms on the locomotive to accomplish their object and in some cases the devices are applied as attachments to the present operating levers,

etc., which in actual service wouldnot only be impracticable but dangerous to the engineman. Y

The object ofemy invention is to so con struct a train stopping mechanism that it will operate mechanically and conform,1n character and ruggedness of construction to other devices now in use on locomotives.

A further objectof my invention is to With these and other objectshereinafter explained inview,my invention consists in "the. construction and combination of elements hereinafter. described and claimed.

Referring now to the drawings, Figure 1 shows a condensed arrangement of, the device; Fig.2 is a side view of the trip device; Figf3 is a part rear view and section on line 3+3; Fig. 4'-is afsection on'line 4-4; Fig.

5 is :1V vertical-section of the trip valve; Fig. 6 is a vertical section of .the controlvalve;

Fig. 7 is a vertical'section of the auxiliary throttle valve; Fig. 8 is afront view of the device applied, to a locomotive and in the act of being t'ripped'bv the tripping device along, side the track; 9'is .a plan viewof the tripping device; Fi lO'is a plan view of the trip lever. applie to a locomotive cylinder.

- Similar characters designate like parts throughout the several figures of the drawmgs. I

,. TRAIN-STOP;

Referring now to the parts by number, 1 represents an engineers brake valve, 2 a train pipe,3 pipe leadingto brake arrange- Patented FebLB, 1916. Application filed May 24, 1913. Serial No. 769,654. i I

ment on the locomotive, {1 pipe leading from engineers valve 1 to main reservoir 5 which is supplied 'wlth compressed air through on practically all locomotives.v Itis in conconnected at a suitable location to the engi: neers valve 1,- at one end and to the trip pipe 6, these devices being in present use valve 8 at the other end.- Intermediate the -two ends of pipe 7 are branches 9, 10 and 11 .leadlng to the controlvalve- 12, auxiliary throttle valve. closing device 13 and the pressure recording gage 14 respectively.

The auxiliary throttle 15 is connected to the closing device by a lever 16, and is located at somefpoint in the steam pipe betweenthe-imai-ni throttle valve and the cylinders of-the'locoinotive, .being' shown in the drawings at the. junction of the dry pipe .18 and steam pipes 19, shown by, dotted lines.

The control valve 12 is also connected to the train pipe 2;by branch pipe 17.

The operation of the arrangement is as follows: Air is supplied to the main reserw voir 5 through'pipe 6, then through pi e 4" and engineers-valve 1 into pipes 2, 1 7, 9, 10, and 11. But en'gineers valve is so constructed that air willnot flow into pipe 7 except when the handle of the engineers valve is in full release position, the 5 v object of which will -be'shown lateron in this description. The pressure in all the pipes having equalized and the handle of the valve 1 placed in running position, then should the trip valve 8 be suddenly opened 5 it remains open until the pressure in pipe- 7 is reduced to practically that of the sur-,

rounding atmosphere and then closes auto matically. There being no'way at the air pressure to reach pipe 7 through engineers valve-1 when the handle 20 is in running position, the pressure therein. will remain reduced until the handle of the" engineers valve is again placed in full releaseposition; This reduction infipressure causes thecontrol-valve 12, (the .operation ofwhich will .be explained later) to open the pipe 17 to the atmosphere, which immediately reduces. the pressure in the train pipe-2 and causes the rakes vof the train to be appliediu the usual'manner. This opening, made the whistle will sound, bringing the matter to the attention of the engineer and fireman.

In order that a record may be kept of the number of automatic applications of the brakes during a given period, a ressure recording gage 14 is connected to t e pipe 7 by the pipe 11.

The reduction in pressure in pipes 7 and 10 causes the triple valve 22 to admit air from auxiliary reservoir 23 into cylinder 24, moving piston rod 25 and lever 16 in a manner to close the auxiliary throttle 15.

It will be seen from the foregoing description that any reduction in the pressure within the pipe 7 will cause the control valve 12 to exhaust air from the train pipe, applying the brake on the entire train, and simultaneously close the auxiliary throttle, cutting off the flow of steam to the cylinders of .the locomotive. In order to restore the pressure in pipe 7 it is only necessary for the engineer to turn the handle of the valve 1 into full release position, thereby releasing the brakes on the entire train and simultaneuou'sly restoring all the devices of this invention to their normal position.

"From the construction of my device it can be applied to any steam locomotive, requires no additional knowledge or skill in its operation than is'now required for the operation and maintenance of a locomotive and .will

cause the train to be stopped, if by negligence or otherwise the engineer shoulddisregard a danger signal.

The trip valve 8 is mounted in a casing 26- which is preferably located on the locomotive cylinder in order that the heat therefrom may prevent the accumulation of ice about the valve in cold weather.

In Figs. 2,3, and 4 the casing 26 is-secured to flange .27 which'is adapted to be bolted to the side of tliecylinder of a loc o-' motive. The flange 27 is provided with a bracket 28 on its lower end which has a supporting bearing 29 on its outer end on which rests the trip lever 30. The trip lever30'is held in position between .casing 26 and bearing 29 by pin 31 and is caused to normally stand in position shown by the spring 32 which is connected by rod 33 to an arm 34. The position of the trip lever in the act of being tripped is shown by dotted lines as 30. Near the inner end of the trip lever is a pocket 35 which engagesa depending arm 36 of the trip valve operating bell crank 37, the b'ellcrank being 'journaled on the pin 38 engages the vertically reciprocating operating stem 39. In moving the tri lever 30 on stem 39 moving same upward, the result of which Will be fully explained under the description of the trip valve 8. The trip valve 8 is provided with lugs 8 engaging guide ways 26 on the inside of the casing 26. In order that the trip valve may be held rigidly in position a set screw 26 is placed in the top of the casing 26 and engages the top of valve 8, thus preventing either lateral or vertical movement of the trip valve.

In Fig. 5 the trip valve 8 is shown in vein. tical section, the upper chamber 40 being in open communication with the pipe 7 and separated from chamber 41 by the dividing wall 42 and puppet valve 43. The valve 43', held on its seat 44 byspring 45 has a guide stem 46 on its upper side engaging a. suitabl.a guide Way in the cap 47. The operating stem 39 is provided with a disk 39 on its lower end in order to provide ample bearing surface for the short arm of the bell crank 37. The cap 48 is provided with a cylindrical chamber 49 which communicates with chamber 41 through port 50. The piston 51 is attached to the operating stem 39 near its upper end and is provided with water grooves 52, the operating stembeing also j provided with water grooves 52*. In the top of the operating stem 39 is a seat which engages the lower extension of the valve stem 46. The operation of the trip valve 8 is as follows: The operating stem 39 being pushed upward by bell crank 37 the puppet valve 43.is lifted from its seat and piston 51 uncovers port 50,- allowing air toescape, from I chamber 40 into chamber 41 and out through port 53 to the atmosphere, at the same time filling chamber 49 through port 50with air at its exhausting pressure. As soon at the bell crank 37 has released the, operating stem I 39 the spring 45 forces the valve 43 and 'piston 51 downward until piston 51 closes port 50 men the downward movement is'suddenly checked by the compression of the air in chamber 49, until the air in this chamber has had time to leak around piston 51.

the cylinder 57. The slide valve is provided with a spring 58 for holding it in proper working position and also has a port 59 vertically through it. The body of the control valve is provided with ports or air passages 60, 61 and 62 which are connected to pipes 9and 17 and whistle 21 respectively. The positions of piston 54 and slide valve 56 shown in Fig. 6 are their normal running positions with the ports 59 and 62 closed, and-pressures equalized on both sides of piston 54. As soon as the trip valve is operated exhausting air froin pipes 7 and 9 the pres i that when the engineers throttle is Open the sure immediately drops in port 60 and behind piston 54 causing the pressure in port 61 and in front of piston 54 to push the piston to the other end of the cylinder and to cause port 59 tov gage with port 62, thereby providing a direct passage for the air from' pipe 17 through ports 61, 59 and 62 and whistle 21, which reduces the pressure in pipe 17 andf2, applying the brakes on the entire train. v

In order to restore the control valve to its normalposition the handle of the engineers valve is placed in full release position, which admits air pressure from the main reservoir into both pipes 9 and 17 but as the port 61 is still open to the atmosphere through-ports 59 and 62 the pressure in pipe 9 and port 60. behind the piston increases beyond. that on the front side of the piston and pushes it back into the position shown, thus causing the ports 59 and 62 to be closed. The air pressure then builds up equally on both sides of the piston. As pipe 9 and port 60 are supplied .with' air pressure through the engineers valve only when the handle of same is in full release position, .a groove 63 is provided whereby air may slowly pass around and maintain an equal pressure on both sides of the piston 54 and throughout the entire piping system of the device.

The auxiliary throttle is so constructed steam flowing through the steampipes to the cylinders acts uoon'valve 64,.pushing it open as shown in Fig. 7, the object being to have the valve held closed against the steam pressure by the operating device 13, when the trip valve 8 has been operated, so that if anything should'fail to work about the operating device, the steam pressure will hold this valve open. The valve 64 is provided. with a cylindrical portion 64 surrounded by.

a guide cylinder 65 which is held tightly in the body 66 by the head 67. Within thecylindrical portion 64 is 3, lug 68 engaging the end of the valve operating rod 69 the opposite end of which is connected to the lever 16 by pin 7 O. The levers 16 and 16 are bothattached to shaft 71, thus completing the mechanism between the operating device 13 and the valve 64. \Vhen trip valve 8 is operated and the pressure in pipes 7' and 10 reduced, the triple valve 22 admits air from auxiliary reservoir 23 into cylinder 7 24, which causes push rod to move outwardly and through the intervention of levers 16 and 16, shaft 71 and valve rod 69 the valve 64 is moved to its seat 72, thus shutting off communication between cham ber 18 and 19". The valve 64 having thus been closed it will remain closed until the pressure in pipes 7 and 10 has been restored to normal, when the valve will resume its position as shown in Fig. -7 But, for some unknown cause, should the valve not return shown by dotted lines.

.to its normal position, it will be opened by the steam pressure in. chamber 18 when the en gineers throttle is opened. From the construction of the valve 64 it will be seen that any ratio between the, areas of the two ends of the valve, may be obtained by increasing or reducing the diameter of the cylindrical portion 64 t The foregoing description has been confined exclusively to that part of the device which is used on the locomotive, but in the remaining paragraphs the part of the device used in conjunction with the signals or. other track devices, for tripping or operating the trip valve and-lever, will be dealt with.

In Fig. 8 the trip lever and casing 26 The device here shown for operating the trip lever 30 consists of an anchor post 73 on top ofwhich is .pivotedthe trip bar or movable .ramp 73 at one end, the opposite end being connected to the reciprocating member 7 4, operating through the casing 75. The reciprocating member is made up of three parts 74,74 and spring 76, and is here 79 connected .to the portion 74. The lever 78 and link 79 form a solid strut when the ramp is out in danger-position inorder that. no shock may be transmitted to the operating mechanism when the trip lever is brought in contact with the ramp by the passinglocomotive. The spring 76.is placed between :the portions 74 and 7 4 of the reciprocating member in order to prevent undue strains in the device due to the velocity of the moving trip leveron the locomotive.

When the trippingdevice shown in Figs. 8 and 9 .is located a proper distance from the track and is set, either by automatic or manually operated devices, into the position shown by full linesit is in danger position and will engagea-nd'operate the trip lever 30 and valve 8 of a locomotive so equipped which attempts to pass. When the ramp 7 3 is moved into clear position 73 the operating partstake positions 74', 74 ,'78v and 79. It will now be seen that in order to stop a moving train equipped with the devices of this invention, the shaft 77 is caused to be rotated in such a manner as to causethe ramp 7 3,to be-moved out-into the path of the I moving trip lever on the side of the cylinder of the locomotive. The anchor post .73 is placed at a sufficient distance from casing 75 100 shown operated by shaft 77, lever 78 andlink engineers valve,

to make the angular movement of the ramp as small as possible without impairing the strength of the bar. This small angle serves to diminish the compressive strains in the operating parts within the casing 75 and increasing the tensile or longitudinal strains in the ramp. i

It will be seen tion that I have accomplished all the object's sought in a thoroughly practical manner without the useof complicated and intricate parts, and that the same ruggedness of construction can be followed in its parts as now used in the construction of locomotive parts.

Having thus described my invention I aim in the appended claims to cover all modifications not involving a departure from its spirit and scope.

1. In an automatic train stop, the combination with an air brake system, provided 4 with an engineers valve, of means for operating said brake system, comprising a trip valve and a control valve, an operative connection between said trip valve and said con trol valve and a direct. operative connection. between said engineers valve and said control valve, whereby an operation of'the trip valve controls the actuation of the control valve to oneposition and an operation-of the engineer-7s valve controls the actuation of the control valve to another position.

2. In. an automatic train stop, the combination with an air brake system provided with an engineers valve, of means for operating said brake system, comprising a trip; valve communicat ng with a port in sald',

with a reciprocating member operating within a chamber therein, the chamber in the trip valve having communication with the chamberin the control valve, said chamber in the control valve having a port communicating with the train line of said brake system. v

4:. In an automatic train stop, the combination of an air brake system, provided with an engineers valve' and a source of power having aregulating means, of means for operating said brake system comprising a trip lalve communicating with a port in said and a control valve having chambers therein communicating with said from the foregoing descrip roadway Lfor operating said trip engineers valve and the trip valve, and

means operated by said trip valve-for conwith an engineers valve,'of "means for operating sa d brake'system, comprising atrip valve communicating with a port in said en- 7 .gineers valve, and a control. valve having opposite chambers therein, one of said chambers communicating with "a chamber in said eng'ineers valve'and the trip valve, the other of said chambers communicating with said brake system and means located along the valve.

. 6; In an automatic train stop, the combination with an air brake system provided with an .engineers valve, of means for operating said brake system, comprisinga trip valve having a chamber therein, means of communication between said trip, valve and said engineers valve, and a control valve having ports communicating with said brake system and said chamber in the trip valve, said trip valve having upper and lower chambers therein, a dividing wall between sa'idchambers,-avalve in the dividing wall and'means for retarding the movement of said valve.

7.}In an automatic train stop, the combination with an air brake system provided with an engineers valve, of means for operating said brake system, comprising a trip valve having a chamber therein, means of communication between said chamber and a chamber in said engineers-valve, and'a control valve ;having a cylindrical chamber therein communicating with said trip valve,

a piston in said chamber and a valve operated by said piston adapted to open and close a port in said brake system.

8. In an automatic train stop, the combination with an air brake system provided with an engineersvalve, of means for operating said-brake system, comprising a trip .valve'having a chamber therein, means of communication between said chamber in the trip valve and a chamber in the engmeers valve through a port when said engineers "alve is in full release position,and a control valve having chambers therein and provided with ports communicating with said brake system and said chamber in the trip valve.

9. In an automatic train stop, the 'combi: nation with an air brake system provided with an engineers valve and a pressurereservoir, of means for operatingsaid brake system, comprising a control valve provided with a chamber having ports communicating with said brake system, and a trip valve provided with a port communicating with said control valves and having upper and lower chambers therein, a valve dividing system, comprising a .trip valve, means of communlcation between said trip valve and said pressure reservoir through said engineers valve, a control valve provided with a chamber having ports communicating with said brake system and said trip valve, said trip valve being provided with upper and lower chambers thereln, a valve d1v1d1ngsaid chambers, means 1n one of sald chambers adapted to retard the movement of said valve, and means for operating said trip valve, comprising a trip lever, means for yieldingly holding the trip lever in normal position and means for transmitting movement from said trip lever to said trip valve.

11. In an automatic train stop, the combination with an air" brake system, providedwith an en 'neers valve of means for o era't- 7 ing said brake system, comprising a trip valve,

means of communication between-said trip valve and a chamber in said engineers valve anda control valve provided with. a reciprocating member operating within a chamber therein, the chamber in the trip valve having communication with the chamber in the controlvalve, said chamber in the control valve being in direct communication with said brake system, and an alarm device having intermittent communication with said chamberin the 'control valve.

12. In an automatic train stop, the combination with an air brake system provided w1th an engmeers valve, ofmeans for operating said brake system, comprising a trip valve communicating w1th said engineers valve, a control valve having chambers therein, one of said chambers communicatmg with the chambers in the said engmeers Valve, and the tr1pvalve,,another of said chambers communicating with said brake system, a housing for said trip valve, said trip valve being provided with guide flanges which engage guideways in said housing and means for securing said trip valve w1thin the housing.

.13. In an automatic train stop, the combination with an air brake system provided with an engineers valve, of an automatic brake operating system, comprising a trip valve, means of communication between said trip valve and a chamber in said engineers valve, a control valve, means of communication between said control valve and' said trip valve, means ofcommunication between said control valve and said brake system,

and a pressure recording means for said brake operating system.

14. In an automatic train stop, the combination with an air brake system provided with an engineers valve and a source of power having a regulating means, ofmeans for operating said brake system comprising a trip valve communica'tlng w1th a port in said engineers valve and a 7 control valve having chambers therein communlcatmg' with a chamoer in said engineers valve-and with the trip' valve and means operated-by said tripvalve'for controlling said power supplemental to said regulating means comtriple valve and means ,for transmitting movement from said air cylinder to sand controlling means. i

This specification signed and witnessed this th day of May A. D. 1913. v

E. WINE. ,In the presence of 'R. HUNT,

Gno. G. LYNCH.-

1 prising an air cylinder, air reservoir and

Classifications
U.S. Classification246/186, 246/185, 246/203.00R
International ClassificationB61L3/04
Cooperative ClassificationB61L3/04
European ClassificationB61L3/04