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Publication numberUS1171081 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 8, 1916
Filing dateJul 2, 1915
Priority dateJul 2, 1915
Publication numberUS 1171081 A, US 1171081A, US-A-1171081, US1171081 A, US1171081A
InventorsWilliam E Aycock
Original AssigneeThomas J Aycock, William E Aycock
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Weather-boarding.
US 1171081 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. E. AYCOCK.

WEATHER BOARDING.

APPLICATION FILED lULY 2.1915.

1 171 ,081 Patented Feb 8, 1916.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

WILLIAM E. AYCOCK, OF .AYCOCK, FLORIDA, ASSIGNOR OF ONE-HALFITO THOMAS J.

AYCOCK, OF AYCOCK, FLORIDA.

Specification of Letters Patent.

WEATHER-BOARDIN G.

Patented Feb. 8, 1916.

Application filed July 2, 1915. Serial No. 37,753. a

To all whom it may concern:

a resident of and whose post-oflice address is Aycock, Jackson county, Florida,qhave invented a new and useful Improvement 1n 7 Weather-Boarding, which invention is fully set forth in the following specification.

This invention relates to an improved form of weather-boarding or siding for use in building, and has for its objectthe provision of weather-boarding or siding which may be readily applied,.which shall produce a weather-tight oint, and which shall pre sent a finished and attractive appearance.

A further object is to provide a weatherboarding or siding which when applied in position on the building and properly ainted shall rick wall pre erably with rake "joints.

An additional object is to provide weatherboarding or siding of the character above indicated which may be made from hard ine, which lumber has not heretofore een deemed desirable for siding purposes by reason of the fact that hard dressed pine will not hold paint readily, the paint being liable tofpeel off, since it does not ad here readily to the extremely hard surface of the pine when dressed in shape for siding. It has heretoforebeen pro osed to provide weather-boarding or sidmg with tongue-and-groove joints, as well as what are known as ship lap joints, but both of these forms of joints have been found objectionable in practice. The tongue-andgroove joint is objectionable because. of the difiiculties that arise in the practical application of the siding to the house. In order to insure a weather-tight joint, the tongue and groove should fit closely, and if there is any unevenness in the manufacture of the tongue and groove, the joint is liable either to fit so tight as to introduce diiiiculty in the application of the siding, or if it fits loosely it will fail to afford the tight joints required. Furthermore, the lumber is liable to absorb moisture from the atmosphere, and the resulting swelling makes it difficult'to apply the tongue to the groove. And finally, hard pine is liable to warp under weather conditions, and before the warped siding can be nailed it has to be forced into position by the carpenter, this being an operation that involves considerable difliculty and much time. The ship lap joint is obresent the appearance of a jectionable becauseit does not afford the weather-tight closure desired for efiective sldlng. Inaddition to these objections, such lumber has usually been smoothed or dressed l on its weather side in order thatit may present an attractive appearance.

By the present invention I am enabled to ent rely overcome all of the objections above indicated, and provide a weather-boarding or siding which may be applied with great facillty by the carpenter so as to produce an efliclent weather-tight joint and at the same time provide siding which, when pro erly pa1nted,1s exceedingly attractive, resem ling m a pearance, if desired, a brick wall with ra e joints when laid in the most approved style by skilledworkmen. 4

According to the present invention, I take a strip of weather-boarding of any suitable length and thickness, and of any suitable kind of lumber, and preferably plane the rear side of the board so as to bring all of .the weather-boarding to a uniform thickness, leaving the front side of the board preferably in its rough-sawed condition, or, if desired, producing any other character of rough front surface. I then form in one edge portion of the board two rabbetsof approximately thev same depth (which may be and preferably is about one-third the thickness of the board), and extending Ion-- gitudinally of the board, and in the other edge portion of the board I form a rabbet extending longitudinally of theboard, and preferably provide a series of transverse grooves extending across the face of the board, the bottoms of said grooves being preferably in the same plane as the .face of one of the two first-named rabbe'ts.

The inventive idea involved is capable of receiving a variety of mechanical expressions, two of which, for the sake of illustrating the invention, are-disclosed in the accompanying drawings, but it is to be expressly understood that such drawlngs are for illustrative purposes only, and are not designed to define the limits of the invention, reference being had to the appended claims for this purpose.

In said drawingsFigure l'is a perspective view of a corner portion of a wall constructed from my improved siding; Fig. 2

is aside elevation of the face of a portion of one of the weather-boards; Fig. 3 is a vertical section through a wall with the siding in position; and Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3, showing a form of weather-board having the two longitudinally extending rabbets on the opposite sides of the upper edge portion of the board, with ,the upwardly projecting tongue between them.

Referring to the drawings, in which like reference numerals indicate like parts throughout the several views, and first to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, 1 indicates the strips of weather-boardiug having the backs 2 thereof preferably dressed smooth, as shown, while the fronts 3 thereof preferably, though not necessarily, have a rough surface, being either the rough-sawed surface as the boards come from the mill, or being otherwise roughened, as desired. Along the upper edge portion of each of the boards 1 are provided two rabbets 4 and 5. These two rabbets are preferably of approximately the same depth with relation to each other, and, as shown, are about one-third the thickness of the board so that the face of the rabbet 4 is approximately twice as far from the front face of the board as is the face of the rabbet 5, though this is not essential. In the lower edge portion of the board, and on the rear face thereof, I provide a rabbet '6, which in depth and vertical extent is of such proportions as to cause it to fit snugly over the rabbet 4 on the next lower board, with the front lower corner portion 7 of the board overhanging the rabbet 5, as will be understood from an examination of Fig. 3. By driving a nail 8 through the lower edge of the board into the stud 9, the faces of the rabbets 4 and 6 and the angles thereof are drawn snugly together, and a tight joint.

protected by the overhang 7 is secured.

In theform of the invention shown in Fig. 4, two rabbets 4' and 5', of approximately equal depth, are formed in the upper edge portion of the board, leaving a tongue 10 projecting upward between the rabbets, and a rabbet 6 is formed on the lower edge portion of the board and on the front face thereof, this rabbet being of such depth that the edge portion of the board left between the front face of the rabbet and the rear face of the board will just snugly fit into and approximately fill the rabbet 4 of the next lower board. In assembling the boards in a Wall, the upper board is first secured in position, and the next lower board is then placed immediately below it, with the tongue 10 fitting snugly into the rabbet 6' 0n the lower edge of the board, and the joint drawn tight by a nail 8 driven through the upper edge portion of the board j ust below the rabbets and into the studding 9.

Preferably, vertical grooves 11 are formed.

transversely to the board and on the front face thereof, the depth of said grooves 11 being approximately that of the rabbets 5 preferably the same or 5, and the width of the grooves being as the width of the rabbets 5 or 5'. It will thus be seen that the bottoms of the grooves 11 are preferably in the same vertical plane as the faces of the rabbets 5 or 5, though this is not essential.

The width of the weather-boards is preferably such that the unrabbeted exposed face of the board is equal to the thickness of a brick, and the distance between the vertical grooves is preferably equal to the length of a. brick. W hen the boards are assembled in position on the side of a house, they should be so assembled as to cause the vertical grooves .11 to break joints or stand in staggered relation in simulation of the joints in a brick wall, as will be appreciated from inspection of Fig. '1. Moreover, at the corners, the best and most finished results will be secured by so cutting the boards as to have, the half brick lengths and the full brick lengths alternate, thus still further simulating a properly laid brick corner.

The faces of the boards may be left in rough-sawed condition or otherwise roughened, as indicated at 12 in the drawings. This is particularly advantageous when the siding is made of hard pine, since it enables the hard pine to receive and efficiently retain the paint which, if the hard pine were smoothly dressed, would peel off in a short time when exposed to the weather. Moreover, this rough or roughened surface adds materially to the simulation of a brick surface, especially when the siding is painted a color resembling that of brick, and the rake oints are painted in a contrasting color to simulate the mortar.

While this roughened surface is particularly desirable when using hard pine as the lumber in making the siding, because of its paint-retaining quality and the closer simulation of a brick surface, it is not to be understood that the invention is limited either to the use of hard pine as the lumber from which the siding is made or to a roughened surface, since the siding, if desired, may be formed of any suitable kind of lumber, and the surface smoothly dressed.

By the construction above described, it will be perceived that I secure a siding which may be readily applied by a carpenter; which affords an efficient and tight joint, amply protected by the overhang in the face of the board; and which, when assembled in the Wall, affords a highly ornamental finish, and lends itself readily to the close simulation of a finely laid brick wall.

While I have described the invention with considerable particularity, in order that the same may be perfectly understood, the invention is not limited to the specific details of construction thus described and illustrated in the drawing, but is broad enough to include variations thereof which would fall within the limits of the claims hereto appended, and which are designed to define the invention.

What is claimed is 1. A weather-board having two longitudinally extending rabbets of approximately the same depth formed in one edge portion, a longitudinally extending rabbet formed in the other edge portion, and a series of transverse grooves extending across the face of the board, the bottoms of said grooves being in the same plane as the face of one of the two first-named rabbets.

2. A weather-boarding having two longitudinally extending rabbets formed in one edge portion, each of said rabbets being in depth approximately one-third the thickness of the board, a longitudinally extending rabbet formed in the other edge portion the depth of said rabbet being approximately one-third the thickness of the board, and a series of transverse grooves extending across the face of the board, the width of said grooves corresponding to that of one of the first-named-rabbets and the bottoms of said grooves being in the same plane as the face of that one of the two first-named rabbets nearest the front face of the board.

In testimony whereof I have signed this specification.

WILLIAM E. AYCOOK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3262239 *Aug 27, 1962Jul 26, 1966Mills Thomas WLaminated wood building unit
US4188762 *Jun 14, 1978Feb 19, 1980Champion International CorporationTriple lap hardboard siding
US20110277409 *May 13, 2010Nov 17, 2011Atkinson David JWood planks with brick-like surface features and method of making same
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/314, 52/541
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/147