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Publication numberUS1172035 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 15, 1916
Filing dateMar 22, 1915
Priority dateMar 22, 1915
Publication numberUS 1172035 A, US 1172035A, US-A-1172035, US1172035 A, US1172035A
InventorsCharles Newton
Original AssigneeCharles Newton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Projectile.
US 1172035 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

CHARLES NEWTON, 0F BUFFALO, NEW YORK.

PROJECTILE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Feb. 15, 1916.

Application filed March 22, 1915. Serial No. 16,013.

To all whom z'z may concern.'

Be it known that I, CHARLES NEWTON, a citizen of the United. States, residing at Buffalo, in the county of Erie and State of New York, have invented new and useful Improvements in Projectiles, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to rifle bullets or projectiles for game shooting and has for its object the production of a bullet for this purpose which will penetrate the atmosphere during flight without undue loss of energy through air resistance and which `will eX- pand easily upon impact with the game thus giving good killing power, yet shall not expand unduly when striking thick esh or bone, thus insuring good penetration through the thicker heavier portions of the body of the game struck.

In the accompanying drawings: Figure 1 is a vlongitudinal sectional elevation of one form of bullet or projectile embodying my invention. Fig. 2 is a front elevation of the same. Fig. 3 is a longitudinal sectional elevation of the inner jacket Section. Fig. 4 is a cross section in line 4 4, Fig. 1. Fig. 5 is a longitudinal sectional elevation showing a modication of my invention. Fig. 6 is a cross section thereof taken on line 6 6, Fig. 5. Fig. 7 is a longitudinal sectional elevation of the inner jacket section shown in Figs. 5 and 6.

Similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views.

Tt is known to those skilled in the art that game when shot is struck by the bullets at various portions of their anatomy, the point of impact not always being under the absolute control of the shooter, due to errors in the aim; also that the 'different portions of the animal which may 'be struck vary in their density and consequent resistance to the bullet. The bullet should therefore be so formed that if the softer portions of the game only are struck the bullet will expand sufficiently to produce a paralyzing wound, yet, it should not expand so freely that when the denser portions are reached it will break up so rapidly as to result in a supercial wound without suiicient penetration to reach a vital spot.

Bullets, asat present made, if suciently yielding to expand freely upon striking soft parts, are apt to break up and lack 1n penetration when the denser, tougher parts are encountered) Conversely, if made ys`ufficiently strong to insure properpenetration kwhen striking the denser parts, they' do not expand sufliciently when the softer parts only are struck.y Therefore the requirement is for a bullet which will expand suciently upon striking the softer portions and yet have its expansion so limited thatl it will penetrate the denser portions.

It is likewise known to those skilled ,in the art that when a softpoint bullet expands the forward yportion of the jacket opens outward and turns hack over and along the sides of the rear portion of the bullet., continuing this process, if of sufficient power and meeting with sufficient resistance, until the jacket of the bullet is turned inside out and the leaden core freed from it, whereupon the core usually goes in pieces and penetration soon stops. vTo overcome this dith-v culty I have designed a bullet'which will expand freely to a certainy extent, after which expansion practically ceases and the bullet continues its course as a solid yprojectile with a blunt point, usually 'surrounded with jagged portions of the ruptured forward portion of the jacket.

Referring to Figs.l 144, 1 represents an inner jacket section of tough, strong and ductile material, such as copper, steel or the like, this section having a tubular body,the front part 2 of which is of `somewhat smaller diameter than the rear part 3 thereof, and has its front end closed by a transverse head 4 while its rear end is open but provided with an inwardly projecting annular iiange 5. Within this inner jacket section is arranged a rear core section 6 of lead ror other plastic or malleable material.

Around the inner jacket section is arranged an outer jacket section 7 of tough strong and ductile material such as copper, steel or the like, a tubular body which is of greater length than the inner jacket section and which has its rear part constructed of cylindrical form and its lfront part -constructed of forwardly tapering form. The rear end of the outer jacket is closed by a transverse head 8 while its front end is open. rThe inner jacket section containing the rear core section is arranged in the rear part of the outer jacket section and bears with its flanged rear end against the rear head of the outer jacket section, as shown in Fig. 1. When thus assembled an annular the .outer section havingv .the outer jacket section and channel is formed between the reduced front part of thev inner jacket section and the adjacent part of the bore of the outer jacket section which channel opens forwardly into the interior lof the f ron't part of the outer jacket section. Into .this channelis placed a filling 10 .of molten solder which upon hardening forms a ring or band which'securely connects thefront end of lthe .inner jacket section and the adjacent central part of the outer jacket-section; j

Within the fro t part of the outer jacket section is arranged agfront core section 11 of le'ad or other soft, .plastic or malleable material, the front coresection abutting at its `rear end against the 'front end of the inner jacket section while the front end of the front core section preferably projects forwardly :throughthe open front end 'of preferably terminates in a sharp point or tip 12. After the partsvof the bullet are'thus assembled the same are'swaged into the shape shown in Fig. l or anyother desired contour.

lnuse, when the bullet strikes the game theexposed tip of soft material, expands and ruptures the front end ofA the outer jacket section, thus 'forming a large and irregularly shaped point which.v tears and Vlacerates the tissues with which itl comes into contact.. j This expansion and rupturing con# tinues, as the bullet progresses, until lit reaches the forward .,end'of the rear core section and innerjacket section. The front end'of the rear core' section being protected f by the solid frontend ofv the inner jacket section does not expand materially Aand the rear core section is thus held together by the inner jacket section and completes the penetration until it emerges on the opposite side of `thebjectstruck or is brought to rest by the resistance. Meanwhile the outer jacket section has been folded back over the rear portions of the bullet and its irregularitiesv contributeto the laceration of tissues andshock imparted. By connecting the front end of the -inner -jacket section with the outer jacket section any. .tendency to strip the outer `jacket entirely off the inner section is prevented. and the musbrooming effeet of the front part of the bullet is prctically arrested at the front end of the inner jacket section. By this method soft lead ma be used for the-forward core section. an the bullet may.be permitted to expand with the greatest freedom until a degrec of expansion isreached suflicient to insure proper shocking power in case only soft arts of the game be struck, yet in case enser portions are struck the rear core section inclosed in the inner jacket section will be protected from disintegration or undue expansion and insure proper penetratiolllxitto reach the vitals of the game which 1B end of the inner jacket section by soldering .or otherwise with the outer jacket section the main advantages of m invention are obtained even though the inner and outer jacket'- sections are not connected in this manner. For instance. as shown in Figs. 5, 6 and 7, the tubular body 13 of the inner jacket section is not separated aty its 'front end from the adjacent part of the outer jacket section by an intervening annular channel which is filled with solder, but instead these parts engage each other evenly throughout their opposing surface and the tenacity of the inner jacket section is relied upon to limit the mushrc oming effect of the front core section and the outer jacket section at the front end of the inner jacket section, and leave the latter solid and in a condition to penetrate farther into the object hit by the bullet.

I claim as my invention:

Y 1. A projectile comprising an inner jacket section which is closed at its front end, a rear core section arranged within the inner jacket section, an outer jacket section inclosing the inner jacket section'and projecting forwardly beyond the latter, and a front core section arranged within the front part of the outer jacket section.

2. A projectile comprising an inner jacket section which is closed at its front end, a rear core section arranged within the inner jacket section, an outer jacket section inclosing the inner jacket section and pro jecting forwardly beyond the latter, and a front core section arranged within the front part of the outer jacket section, said rear core section being of harder material than said front core section.

3. A projectile comprising an inner jacket which is closed at its front end and open at its rear end, a rear core section arranged on said inner jacket section, an outer jacket section inclosing said inner jacket section and having a closed rear end and an open front end and having its front part projecting forwardly beyond the front end of said inner jacket section, and a front core sec tion arranged in the outer jacket section in front of the inner jacket and rear core section.

4.-. A projectile comprising an inner jacket section which is closed at its front end, a. rear core section arranged within the inner imacat jacket section, an outer jacket section inc1osing the inner jacket section andprojecting forwardly beyond the latter, and a front core section arranged Within the front part of. the outer jacket section, said inner and outer jacket sections being connected'at `the freint end of the inner jacket section.

5. A projectile comprising an inner tti-'cnlar jacket which is closed at its front end and open at its rear end and which has the front part of its tubular Wall constructed ef smaller diameter than the rear part tlieree,s a rear core section arranged 1n the inner jacket section, an outer tubular jacket eeeinner jacket section and the bore of said outer jacket section, a lling of adhesive materia! arranged in said channel and connect-= ing the adjacent parts of the inner and outer jacket sections, and a front core section ai' ranged in the front part of the outer jacket section.

entre Nemen.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2927071 *Mar 4, 1947Mar 1, 1960William R HueyJacketed uranium nuclear reactor fuel element
US2932253 *Jan 10, 1955Apr 12, 1960Auxier Jean LProjectiles
US2958287 *Jul 16, 1954Nov 1, 1960Auxier Jean LProjectile
US4793037 *Feb 6, 1987Dec 27, 1988Carter Herman LMethod of making a bullet
US20070017409 *Jun 20, 2005Jan 25, 2007Alliant Techsystems Inc.Non-expanding modular bullet
Classifications
U.S. Classification102/507
International ClassificationF42B12/78
Cooperative ClassificationF42B12/78
European ClassificationF42B12/78