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Publication numberUS1173499 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 29, 1916
Filing dateAug 17, 1915
Priority dateAug 17, 1915
Publication numberUS 1173499 A, US 1173499A, US-A-1173499, US1173499 A, US1173499A
InventorsFranz Fleischmann
Original AssigneeFranz Fleischmann
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Temporary clamp for artificial slates or tiles.
US 1173499 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. FLEISCHMANN.

TEMPORARY CLAMP FOR ARTIFICIAL SLATES 0R TILES. APPLIcAloN FILED Aue. I1, 1915.

1,173,499.. Patented Feb. 29,1916.

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THE ooLUMmA PLANOGRAPH co.. WAsHmuTuN, D. C.

F. FLEISCHMANN.

TEMPORARY CLAMP FOR ARTIFICIAL SLATES 0R TILES.

APPLICATION FILED AUG. I7, 1915.

Patented Feb. 29, 1916.

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FRANZ FLEISCHMANN, OF KLAGENFURT, AUSTRIA-HUNGARY.

TEMPORARY CLAMP FOR ARTIFICIAL SLATES OR TILES.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Feb. 29, 1916.

Application led August 17, 1915. Serial No. 45,874.

To all whom t maja/concern:

Be it known that I, FRANZ FLEISCHMANN,

'a subject of the Emperor of Austria-Hungary, residing at 2 Wulfengasse, Klagenfurt, Corinthia, Austria-Hungary, have invented certain new and useful Improvements, 1n Temporary Clamps for Artificial Slates or Tiles, of which the following is a specification.

It is known that artificial slate-tiles warp under the iniiuence of the sun, so that they must be held down by so-called stormclamps. These consist of a nail preferably made of copper, the broad head of which, 1s inserted below the butt-joint of two adjoining tiles, in such a manner that the pm of the nail projects through the jointupwardly and engages a hole, the so-called stormclamp-hole, of a third plate' which overlaps the two plates` whereafter the said nall is bent over, so that 'all three plates are pressed together by this storm-clamp. Through these storm-clamp holes, however, which lessen the covering capacity of the tiles, the rainwater may enter, and if the rain lasts long, will pour through the roof.

According to this invention, this drawback is avoided by an arc-shaped (or U- shaped) clamp, the lower leg of which is equipped with lateral, flat extensions and with a bent broadened end, so that the adjoining tiles which are superposed upon the flat projections, are clamped together with the overlapping tile which is inserted into the clamp without any necessity of perforating the tiles.

The flat projections of the clamp may form an integral bent part of the clamp, or it may consist of a plate connected with the clamp. Further, the clamps Ymay stay permanently in the roof, or be removed after the seasoning of the roofing.

In the drawing the subject of the invention is shown in several modifications.

Figure 1 is a front view showing the device together with the clamped tiles in the ordinary style of roofing. Fig. 2, a section on line A-A of Fig. 1. Fig. 3, a section on line B-B of Fig. 1. Figs. 4 and 5 show other modifications of the clamp. Fig. 6 shows another modification of the clamp seen from the top. the tiles being laid in the German stvle. Fig. 7 is the corresponding` side-view. Fig. 8 shows a front view clamp connected with@ metal plate and used in the ordinary style of roofing. Fig. 9, a section of line C- i' fC of Fig. 8. Fig. 10, a section on line D-D of' Fig. 8. Figs. 11 to 14 show other modified forms of clamp. Fig. 15 shows a second form of the clamp used with the tiles laid in the German style. Figs. 16 to 18 show modifications of a clamp made of sheet iron or tin plate.

The improved device for fastening the ltiles on roofs generally consist of a springy clamp with two unequal legs l, 2 made of steel-wire (Figs. 1 to 7), the longer leg 1 being bent out and flattened in a plane at 'right angles to the plane of the short leg 2 of the clamp. As shown in Figs. 1 to 3, the leg 1 maybe lbent to one side or, as Fig. 4 sho-ws, it may be formed like an S. In the latter case an enlargement 4 may be provided for. In Fig. 5 another modification of the clamp is sho-wn, where there are two lateral portions constituting the longer leg, such portions being bent in opposite directions so that the clamp is heart-shaped.

The shorter leg 2 of the clamp is, in all modifications, bent with its free end toward the other leg 1 either directly or with an intermediate c oil :forming a spring between the two legs.

The end l of the other flattened leg 1 is bent out forwardly and suitably thickened (see Fig. 1). The bent part 4 may be continued, as shown in Fig'. 1, and form afurther flat part 5, or it may form a hook 6 (see Fig. 4) extending over both sides. YAccording to Fig. 5 each leg l is bent at its end to form a hook 7 pointing in opposite directions.

In Figs. 6 and 7 a clamp is shown which i is similar to the clamp shown in Figs. 1 to 3, with the difference that the flattened leg l is considerablylonger than the leg 2.

In Figs. 8 to 12 other modifications of clamps are shown, in which the wire is formed into a resilient clamp having unequal legs 1, 2, the lower and longerv leg 1 having a plate 8 connected thereto which forms the flat, lateral extensions and which is made of tin-plate or sheet iron. This plate is formed with a longitudinal groove 9 into which is laid the leg 1, the latter being fastened by bent parts 9 of the said plate.

The free end l of the clamp leg is normally'bent either toward the left hand (see Figs. 8 to 10) or toward the right hand. or

-it may be bent so it forms, at .right angles to the plane of the wire-clamp 2, a hook (see Fig. 11) or a loop (see Fig. 12). In the modifications shown in Figs. 8 to 12 the plate 8 is provided on one side with a projection 12 on which the broadened end of the leg 1 rests, whereby the tilting of the clamp-leg to this side is prevented.

In the clamp shown in Fig. 15 the leg 1 is considerably longer than they plate 8, so that its end can not bear upon the plate 8 and therefore, in this modification, the projection 12 ott the plate is omitted. The free end of the leg 1 of the clamp shown in Fig. 15 bent to the right side, but, as shown in Figs. 8-12, it can also be bent to the left side, or it can be widened to form a hook or an ear.v

According to Figs. 13 and 14 the end 13 i of the leg 1 is bent in opposite direction to leg 2; that is to say downwardly, and it is pointed at its free end thereby forming a nail which is to be driven into the woodwork of the roof.

In Figs. 16418 two other modifications of clamps are shown, which are made of a single piece of tin-plate or sheet iron. In the clamp shown in Fig. 16 the plate 8, which,

has a longitudinal groove 9 and which forms the lower leg 1 of the clamp, is formed with a hook 23 in alinement with the groove 9, which hook may be bent either to the right or to the left hand side. The clamp shown in Fig. 17 has this hook 23 and in addition an upwardly projecting integral part 24 of the plate 8, such part 24 being on the opposite side of hook 23 from the groove 9. In Fig. 18 the hook 23 is omitted, and on both sides of the groove projections 24, extending upwardly, are arranged. In the modification of the clamp shown in Figs. 16. and 18 the springy short leg 2 is made of the material of the end of the plate-8 opposite to the end provided with the hook 23 and projections 24, respectively. In this case the upper leg 1 may form a triangle(Fig. 16) or, as shown in Figs. 17 and 18, it may consist of two pointed projections 25. which are either parallel (see Fig. 17 )v or bent toward each other (see Fig. 18).

In Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 8-10 the application of the clamp to ordinary style roofing is shown, and in Figs. 6, 7 and 15 to the socalled German style roofing. The application of the clamp is effected as follows: As evident from Figs. 1 to 5 and 8 to 10 the clamp is laid with its flat part 1, or projections 8, upon the lower roofing tile 14, in such a manner that the resilient leg 2 is on top. Two other tiles 15, 16 are then placed on both sides of the clamp, the edges of which are provided, at the point adjacent the end or ends of the leg 1, with recesses 17, while such edges otherwise adjoin each other to form a butt-joint 18. By means of the recesses 17 the respective vlocation of the two tiles is determined, so that the clamp also serves for controlling the correct overlapping of the tiles.

In the S-shaped clamp shown in Fig. 4, the recesses are notuonly provided at the point of the hook shaped end, but also at the thicker part 4 of the middle of the clamp.

When using the clamps shown in Figs. 8 to 15 and 16 to 18 the adjoining edges of the tiles 15 and 16 must be spaced apart adjacent the plate 8, so as to'make room for the part constituting the longitudinal groove 9.

In the device shown in Fig. 15 the spacing must be such as to leave room for the whole length of the leg 1.

The recesses 17 of the plates may be made either in the manufacturing process or cut with a chisel or the like when the tiles are being mounted. Into the recess or recesses 17 the bent or thickened part 1 or 4 (Figs 1, 6 and 8) or the hook 6, 10, 23 (Figs. 4, 11, 16 and 17) or the ear 11 (Fig. 12) or the projections 24 of the clamp (Figs. 17, 18) is laid, and thereby the clamp is secured in 'position in relation to the two tiles 15, 16.

The covering tile 22 is then inserted into the clamp, so that it be located under the leg 2.l

The leg 2, which is springy, or is pressed downwardly after the insertion of the tile 22, presses the latter against the lower tiles 15, 16, clamping all threey plates 15, 16 and 22 together by one clamp and avoiding uncovered holes.

In the case of the clamps shown in Figs. 6, 7 and 15, which are particularly used in the German style of roofing. the recessing or cutting of the tiles is avoided, as the leg 1 is so long that its end grips and holds the upper edge of the tile.

As soon as the tiles are completely hardened and dried, so that they will warp no more, the clamps shown in Figs. 8 to 10 and 15 can be removed after the upper leg 2 has been loosened and they can be used over again, while the other clamps are designed to stay in the roof.

What I claim is:

1. A clamp, for temporarily pressing upon the lower portions of two. substantially abutting artificial tiles which have their top edges secured to the framing of the roof and. the adjacent edges of which are covered by the lower part of another tile also having its top edge secured to the framing of the roof, comprising a springy pincershaped member having a flat lower leg shaped to extend below both of the substantiallv abutting tiles and adapted to be suspended from at least one of the tiles.

2. A. clamp, for temporarily pressing upon the lower portions of two substantially abutting' artificial tiles which havey their top edges secured to the framing of the root` and which are covered by the lower part of another tile also having its top edge secured to the framing of the roof, comprising a springy pincer-shaped member having a fiat lower leg shaped to extend below both of the substantially abutting tiles and provided with a projection in a position where it is caused, by the action of gravity, to bear against the top edges of at least one of the tiles.

3. A clamp, for temporarily pressing upon the lower portions of two substantially abutting artificial `tiles which have their top edges secured to the framing of the roof and the adjacent edges of which are covered by the lower part of another tile also having its top edge secured to the framing of the roof, comprising a springy pincershaped member having a flat lower leg shaped to extend below both of the substantially abutting tiles and provided with a projection in a position to engage a recess in at least one of the tiles.

4. A clamp, for temporarily pressing upon the lower portions of two substantially abutting artificial tiles which have their top edges secured to the framing of the roof and the adjacent edges of which are covered by the lower part of another tile also having its top edge secured to the framing of the roof, comprising a springy, pincer-shaped member, formed of wire, having a Hat lower leg shaped to extend below both of the substantially abutting tiles and provided with at least one projection to engage a corresponding recess in the tiles.

5. A clamp for temporarily pressing together the lower portions of two superposed layers of artificial roof tiles the top portions of which are secured to the roof, comprising a. springy hinge-joint, a ngerlike upper jaw, a flat lower jaw and means for suspending the clamp from at least one tile.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

FRANZ FLEISCHMANN.

Witnesses HERMAN VVUNDERLIGH7 WENZEL PLATZER.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for ive cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. G.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5617690 *Jan 15, 1993Apr 8, 1997Gibbs; Alden T.Slate mounting assembly
US7444790 *Sep 7, 2001Nov 4, 2008Nu-Lok Roofing Systems Pty, Ltd.Weather strips
US8312685 *Apr 30, 2009Nov 20, 2012Gibbs Alden TSystem for roofs and the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/546, 52/547, 52/543, 52/548
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/34