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Publication numberUS1181098 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 25, 1916
Filing dateSep 8, 1915
Priority dateSep 8, 1915
Publication numberUS 1181098 A, US 1181098A, US-A-1181098, US1181098 A, US1181098A
InventorsWilliam M Lambert
Original AssigneeAnthony Eisler & Co, Anthony Eisler, Junius Nagel, William M Lambert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Address label and card.
US 1181098 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. M. LAMBERT.

ADDRESS LABEL AND CARD.

APPUCATION FILED SEPT. 8. I9l5- L W1 MW, I Patented Apr. 25,1916.

2 SHEETS-SHEETS].

W. M LAMBERT. ADDRESS LABEL AND CARD. APPLICATION man SEPT. s. 1915.

htnted Apr. 25, 1916.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2;

E UUMPAW WILIMM Id. LAMBERT, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNQB T0 ANTHONY EISLER & 00., 0F YORK, N. Y., A FIRM COMPOSED OF ANTHOW EISLER, JUNIUSNAGEL. AND

SAID WILLIAJWI M. LAMBERT.

ADDRESS LABEL AND CARD.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Apr. 25, i916.

Application filed September J3, 1915. Serial No. 49,453.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that 1, WILLIAM M. LAM- BERT, a citizen or the United States, and a resident of the borough of Manhattan,

city, county, and State of New York, have' invented a new and useful Improvement in Address Labels and Cards, of which the following is a specification.

The invention is adapted to a great variety of uses. As an example, in commercial transactions involving the delivery of merchandise by express, freight, parcel post, hand, or otherwise, it is a convenience, both to the vendor and the vendee, to have the bill, invoice or other record accompany the goods, so that upon. opening the package, the goods contained therein may be 'forthwith checked up upon the bill, invoice or other record, and thus assurances to both parties be accurately and specdlly had. Also in. stock rooms, repair departments, storage places, and the like, itis frequently convenient to have means for inolosing and protecting a memorandum, statement, or other record of the contents of the package, or the ownership, destination, use, or work to be done, attached to the outside of the package. These results have heretofore been secured by the use of the so-called tag envelop, which is an envelop or receptacle adapted to contain the invoice, bill, or other record, made of strong material and usually. prov1ded wlth a reinforced eyelet or eyelets, through which the cord which ties up the package can be passed, or by means 0 which a supplemental cord can be used to attach it to the package; These tag envelops are, however, objectionable for thefollowing reasons: Where no cord is used to tie up the package, there is nothing to which to attach the envelop and other means have to be provided therefor. This difficulty arlses whenever the package is a wooden, fiber or corrugated paper box, the latter being sealed by adhesive material. Also 1t frequently happens in the handling of such packages that the tag envelop rests noon the floor of the car, wagon, or the like, in v -ich it is being transported, and that another package is placed in such close proximity thereto as to rest upon the tag envelop, so

that when the package is lifted with more or less force for removal from the car, Wagon, or the like, that the tag will be either torn ofi' or mutilated, owing to the cutting action of the cord upon the envelop or its equivalent, resulting in loss of the bill or invoice. Furthermore, in han; dling packages of comparatively little weight, the tag envelop affords a convenient means whereby the delivery people'can take hold of the package, so that it is sometimes torn off, or if not, is invariably crumpled, if not mutilated, resulting in corresponding defacement of the bill, invoice, or other m1; tter contained therein.

Under my invention I obviate all of the above stated objections and also secure additional advantages and at a cost materially less than that incident to the use of the tag envelop.

Referring to the drawings, Figure 1 is a plan view of an address label or card embodying my invention; Fig. 2 is a side or edgewise view of the construction shown in Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a side or edgewise',view of an alternative construction; Fig. 4 is a side or cdgewise view of a simpler alternative construction; Fig. 5 is a plan view,

from beneath, of the construction shown in Fig. 4, the parts being laid out flat; Fig. 6 is a plan view of a construction adapted to use on parcel post packages, so that it may be opened for inspection by the postal authorities; Fig.v 7 is a longitudinal sectional view of the construction shown in Fig. 6; Fig. 8 is a plan view of a form of the invention in which the address label or card is made of substantial, strong material, which has been indented, perforated, or scored, so that the part of the label or card superposed upon the envelop or container may be more easily removed; Fig. 9 is a longitudinal sectional view of the construction shown in Fig. 8.

In the side or edgewise views above described, I have shown the two sides of the envelop as quite decidedly separated from each other for the sake of clearness in illustration. i

In the drawings 1 represents an address label or card of, suitable material, preferably fair quality paper or cardboard, which ferred and suitable construction attached as at at to the under side of the label or card 1', and may be attached at other points ifdesired.

5 is the flap of the envelop, which may be supplied with adhesive material 6 upon its edge, as usual, and which projects upwardly through a slit 7 made in the address label or card 1.

The operation of the parts as thus far described is as follows: In the delivery of goods, for instance, a merchant sending a package makes out the bill, invoice or other record therefor, and also writes or prints the name, address and other desired matter upon the label, and upon tipping the flap 5 of the envelop over to the right (see Fig. 2) introduces the bill, invoice, or other record or matter into the envelop through the slit 'l'. Thereupon the flap T is tilted over to the left in the direction of, the arrow as shown in Fig. 2, and the adhesive material on'Tthe flap'bemg moistened, it IS stuck down upon the face of the label, as shown in Fig.

1. The label, the card, or the flap of the envelop may beneficially bear upon their exposed surfaces words indicating that the bill, invoice or other matter is within the envelop beneath the label. The exposed edges of the label are thereupon moistened on the back, The adhesivematerial will 'thus become tacky and the label. beinglaid back down upon the package and pressed thereon will attachitself thereto whether the surface be metal, wood, paper, fiber, or

whatnot. It will be noted that preferably the surface of the envelop which comes in contact with the package'bears no adhesive material and that therefore there'will be no adhesion between it and thepackage, although its opposite surface is attached to the back of the label at one or more points as desired. Obviously, since the edges of the label are all securely attached to the package, the envelop, which incloses the bill, invoice, or other matter, will be safely imprisoned beneath it and also. that there will be no upturned edges to be torn, no possibility of the envelop or label being used 'as a. handle, no possibility of its being torn away from the'package by rough usage of v the package in transit or by the presence of the insertion of the point of a knife or equivalent device, and tearing it from the label.

If desired for greater security, the right and the label or card attached to the package by tacks, adhesive strips, sewing, or in anyother preferred manner. In Fig. 3 I show a construction in which there is no slit in the label orcard, on the contrary, the envelop is set so far to the right that the open end of the envelop will be substantially coincident with the end of the label or card, and the flap of the envelop can therefore be folded over the end in the direction of the arrow and fastened by adhesive material as before.

In Figs. l and 5 I show a cheaper construction because instead of there being a completed envelop, a flat and preferably parallel sided piece of paper 9 is folded upon itself, as at 10, the longer part whereof is folded as at 1'2 at'its free end to coincide with the adjacent edge of the label or card to form the flap 5, which will of course be provided with adhesive edges and fold over upon the label-in the direction of the ll l'l'()\\'.

Obviously the constructions shown in Figs. 3, stand 5 may have the adhesive material 8 on the under side of the envelop or folded paper, as stated above in connection with the other figures.

In Figs. 6 and 7 I show a construction specially intended for use on parcel post packages, in which it is necessary that the envelop be opened for inspection by the postal authorities.

In this construction I provide in addition to the slit 7 through which the flap 5 of the envelop projects, as in Fig. 1, or in the event that the flap is folded over the edge of the label or card, then immediately adjacent to the edge of the label or card, I make a supplemental slit 15, so that the forward ed e of the flap may be inserted in it, yet easiy removed therefrom, so that the postal authorities may readily slip the flap backwardly, examine the contents of the envelop, replace the same in the envelop, and again insert the flap within thesupplemental slit. Instead of the slit the article may be provided with the usual string and attaching button around which the string is wound, or any other suitable attaching device may be used In Figs. 8 and9 I show a construction in which the label or card is made of material so tough that there is danger that the flap of the envelop might be torn away in the attempt to remove it from beneath the label label or card to thepackage 'or the conor card. To facilitate this operation the label or card is provided adjacent to the edges with perforations 16. Instead of the perforations extending entirely through the label or card, scorings, or indentations, as at 17. will in some instances be sufficient.

It will be obvious tothose who are familiar with such matters that variations may be made ,in the details of construction and method of application of the device Without departing from the essentials of the invention. For instance, it is not essential that the container should be physically attached to the label or card, although this is the preferred form; also that adhesive material, if used, may be applied in any preferred manner either to the edges of the label 01' card to bcmoistened at the time of application to the package, or to the edges of the card and to the entire under side of the container either prior to or at the time of application to the package, or the adhesive material may he applied directly upon the package and the label, card and container pressed thereon. Indeed, the method of attaching the tainer to the label or card, forms no essential part of this invention. Tacks, adhesive strips. sewing, or any other means of attachment may be employed. Also the material of which the label, card or container is made and the shape thereof may all be the label or card, the container having a i flap adapted to fold over and be attached to the upper exposed face of the label or card,

2. As a new article of manufacture, a label or card and a separate container, adapted to receive and protect a bill, invoice or other contents, attached to the under side of the label or card, the container having a flap adapted to fold over and be attached to the upper exposed side of the label or card, and adhesive material on the surface of the container which comes in contact with the package adjacent to the flap.

3. As a new article of manufacture, a label or card and a separate container, adapted to receive and protect a bill, invoice or other contents, attached to the under side of the label or card, a plurality of the edges of the label or card projecting beyond the container, the container having a flap which extends through a slit in the label or card and is adapted to be folded over and attached to the face of the label or card.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification.

WILLIAM M. LAMBERT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2671678 *Feb 20, 1950Mar 9, 1954Arthur Walsh RobertImprovement in label and label protector
US2682721 *Jul 6, 1953Jul 6, 1954Harris David BProtected label
US2843310 *Jan 10, 1956Jul 15, 1958Gaw O Hara Envelope CoShipment data holder
US3921319 *Sep 11, 1972Nov 25, 1975Styers James DPocket-forming member with window therein
US7311205Jan 25, 2005Dec 25, 2007Target Brands, Inc.Pharmacy bottle system including label
US7413082Jan 25, 2005Aug 19, 2008Target Brands, Inc.Pharmacy bottle system including label
US7628427Jan 25, 2005Dec 8, 2009Target Brands, Inc.Pharmacy label system
US7661533Sep 27, 2007Feb 16, 2010Target Brands, Inc.Bottle with spine label
US7942451Jun 28, 2006May 17, 2011Target Brands, Inc.Medication packaging and labeling system
US7980391Feb 15, 2010Jul 19, 2011Target Brands, Inc.Pharmacy bottle system including a container having a recessed surface
US8025314May 14, 2003Sep 27, 2011Target Brands, Inc.Medication packaging and labeling system
US8281929Sep 2, 2010Oct 9, 2012Target Brands, Inc.Pharmacy label with securable tab and systems associated therewith
US8752705Jul 18, 2011Jun 17, 2014Target Brands, Inc.Packaging system with pharmacy bottle and label
US8870004Oct 25, 2011Oct 28, 2014Target Brands, Inc.Pharmacy bottle, system, and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/74, 40/674, 40/124.6
Cooperative ClassificationB65D27/00