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Publication numberUS1185684 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1916
Filing dateFeb 3, 1905
Priority dateFeb 3, 1905
Publication numberUS 1185684 A, US 1185684A, US-A-1185684, US1185684 A, US1185684A
InventorsHenry P Kraft, Maximilian Charles Schweinert
Original AssigneeSchrader S Son Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Valve for pneumatic pillows and other articles.
US 1185684 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. P. KRA'FT & M. CISCHWEINERT. VALVE FOR PNEUMATIC PILLOWS AND OTHER ARTICLES.

APPLICATION FILED FEB- 3 I905.

Patented June 6, 1916.

i I? a INVENTORSi ya WITNESSES:

By ltomeyi,

vation and partly in section.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

HENRY P. KRAFT, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., AND MAXIMILIAN CHARLES SCHWEINEBT, OI E WEST HOIBOKEN, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNORS TO A. SCHRADERS SON, INCORPORATED, 015' NEW YORK, N. Y., A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

VALVE FOR PNEUMATIC PILLOWS AND OTHER ARTICLES.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed February 3, i905. Serial No. 244,061.

I To all whom it may concern:

residing in the borough of Brooklyn, county of Kings, city and State of New York, and MAXIMILIAN CHARLES SCHWEINERT, residing at West Hoboken, in the county of Hudson and State of New Jersey, both citizens of the United States, have jointly invented certain new and useful Improvements in Valves for Pneumatic Pillows and other Articles, of which the following is a specification. I

This invention aims to provide certain improvements in valves of the type commonly used for pneumatic pillows or ads of various sorts, whereby it is simpllfied and certain economies are effected in construction, and whereby also ease of operation and durability of the valve are secured. These valves generally are not automatic. They are usually blown up by inserting the end of the valve tube into the mouth and blowing into the pillow or other article, and then closing the valve by screwing down on the end of the valve tube a cap or other device carrying the valve proper. .To insure a tight closure the valve proper is ordinarily screwed down with considerable force, and it is sometimes flattened out so as to spread it against the adjacent inner face of the cap inwhich it is carried and with regard to whichit has generally a relative rotary movement. Thus the valve proper is liable to become permanently distorted and also to be worn on the edge by attrition against the. inner and usually unfinished face of the cap.

According to one feature of this invention the edge of the valve proper is surrounded by a ring of metal which moves with the valve proper so as to avoid attrition of the edges ofthe latter and which also confines the valve proper so as to prevent undue spreading and'distortion of the same.

Various other features of advantage are referred to in detail hereinafter.

The accompanying drawings illustrate embodiments of the invention.

Figure 1 isa longitudinal section of a valve of a larger type. Fig. 2 is a view of the several parts within the cap before be ing assembled, the view being partly in ele- Fig. 3 is partly an elevation and artly a section of the cap before the assem ling of the parts. Fig. 4a is a plan of a piece whicliforms a hollow head on the 'cap and at the same time a means for connection to apump. Fig. 5 1s a section similar to Fig. 1, showing a smaller type of valve. Fig. 6 is partly an elevation and partly a section'of the several members of the cap of Fig. 5 before assembling. Fig. 7 is a plan of the cap of Fig. 5.

Referring to the drawings, A is a pneumatic pillow or other hollow article; B a valve tube cemented or otherwise attached thereto; C avalve proper seating on the end of this tube, and D a rotary cap embracing and swiveled on the end of the'tube for 010s:

Patented June 6,1916. I

ing and opening the valve proper, the letter 7 D referring to the cap as a whole.

proper may be any suitable valve, that shown consisting of a packing ring, washer or disk of rubber or other packing material, 4

and being arranged opposite the seat E and carried by the cap D.

The cap D is'a tubular member embracv ing the outer end ofthe valve tube B and moving the valve proper C toward and from the seat E as the cap is screwed on or off the tube. The cap has a tubular inwardlyextending neck K to the inner end of which the valve proper is attached, an annular chamber L being formed around the inner end of the neck K which chamber communicates with the valve tube when the valveproper is lifted, the valve proper being of less diameter than theshell of the cap. The

air enters-"the chamber L by way of one or more ducts M through the wall-of the neck K, as indicated by the arrow. A carrier 0 for carrying the valve proper consists of a plate or cup having an upwardly and-inwardly turned edge embracing the rib on the outer edge of the lower end of the neck K so asto be supported from said neck. At

the same time the carrier 0 is loose upon the neck so that it may turn with substantially no friction thereon.

In previous valves the neck K has been closed at the bottom. On account of the smallness of the parts the ducts M must be bored as near the lower end of the neck K as possible. The tools for boring these ducts are very fine and delicate, and have been frequently broken by being placed a little too low so that they struck the solid bottom of the neck. By boring the neck K entirely through in the manner indicated there isno longer necessary the nicety of adjustment of the tools for boring or unching the ducts M nor the danger of brea ing these tools. The valve proper is pressed hard against the carrier.() at its inner edge, and against the valve seat on its lower face so that there is no possibility of an escape of air through the open lower end of the neck K. Also we propose to form a connection for a pump by merely providing the upward extension P which is integral with the neck K and which is screw-threaded for making the desired Connection. The neck K and extension constitute a single piece of metal, whlch 1s provided at an intermediate point with an outside tapered rib Q, which is held firmly between an inwardly-extending rib R of the shell S of the cap and a flange T formed by swaging over the tapered upper edge of the shell. The rib Q, is preferably corrugated on its upper face in the manner indicated in Big. 4 so as to prevent rotation thereof relatively to the shell. The flange T therefore holds the extension P rigidly and with the ap earance of being integral therewith.

The carrier 0 is provided on its under side with a headed central projection or stud U which passes through the center of the annular ring C constituting the valve proper and thereby fastens the latter to the carrier.

An important feature of improvement is the provision of a ring V of metal'surrounding the edge of the valve proper C to prevent it from spreading outward to the inner wall of the shell when the valve seat is pressed against it; and a backing W also of metal which bears against the under side of the carrier 0 so that the latter forms a bearing plate. When the cap is screwed down it presses the packing face of the valve proper upon the seat, and the friction at this point prevents rotation of the valve proper relatively to the seat and a consequent distortion, while the backing plate W presses in an axial direction upon the under side of the carrier(), which in turn bears against the lower edge of the metal neck K, thus constituting a double antifriction hearing be tween the two pairs of metal surfaces, (that is to say at the contact of-O and K on the one hand and of W and O on the other hand) which permits rotation of the cap relatively to the packing with the very least amount of friction. At the same time the ring V which surrounds the edge of the valve proper prevents extreme outward distortion thereof and protects the edges in the manner explained, at the same time insuring that the greater part of the distortion shall be inward to squeeze the packing material around the central stud U and make a tight joint at that point. The rim V is preferably formed as a flange on the edge of the backing plate W, and the latter is apertured to permit it to pass over the stud U. The carrier 0 is provided on its under face with a central shouldered portion X fitting loosely in the aperture in the backing plate W so as to center the latter.

For smaller valves (Figs. 5, 6 and 7 the cap is much more simply constructed. In this case it consists of a shell S, which may be turned from solid metal, with a screwthread J at its lower end fitting the screwthread H upon the upper end of the valve tube B. The interior of the shell is slightly larger above the screw-threaded portion to form a chamber a in which is carried the valve proper C consisting in this case of a complete disk of packing material slightly larger in diameter than the end of the valve tube which constitutes the'valve seat E. In the form shown in Fig. l the valve proper is attached to the ring V and backing plate W through the central headed stud U, but Where this central stud is lacking as in Fig. 5 the ring V and backing plate W are preferably made in the form of a cup and are permanently attached to the valve proper C by crimping inward the edge of the ring V over the lower or operative face of the valve proper to form a small flange b. The member V W may be of such diameter (above the flange b) as to carry the valve proper loosely therein, as is the case with the ring V of Fig. 1; or itmay be made to fit the valve proper closely in the manner shown in Fig. 5. The ring V is sufliciently smaller than the chamber a in diameter to move loosely therein without friction, being at the same time of suflicient axial depth to prevent its becoming skewed therein, and to insure that it shall always fit flatly on the valve seat.

The backing plate W may be made slightly convex, as indicated, so that the valve proper may adjust itself to any unevenness of the seat by having a compensating hearing. The bearing plate 0 against which the backing plate W bears constitutes the head of the cap, and for simplicity is preferably a plain flat disk. The backing plate 'W bears against the bearing plate or head 0 with very little friction, especially where the backing plate is convex as shown, and in other respects the ring V and bearing plate W serve the same functions as have been described in detail for the corresponding elements of Fig. 1,

The cap D is assembled in the manner indicated in Fig. 6. The shell S is provided with a shoulder R upon which the head 0 rests, and with an upwardly-extending tapered edge T which is subsequently swaged over the edge of the head 0 to hold the latter firmly and neatly in place. The space between the shoulder R and the screw-threads J constitutes the chamber a in which the valve proper C incased in the ring V and backing plate W is free to move up and down or to rotate, and also to rock sufliciently to assume an even bearing upon the valve seat.

I valves in the strictest sense of the word.

Certain features of our 1mproved con-j struction are applicable to various other types of valve than that illustrated, as well as to dust caps or other caps which are not Though we have described with great particularity of detail certain embodiments of the invention, yet it is not to be understood therefrom that the invention is limited to the particular embodiments described. Various modifications thereof in detail and in the arrangement and combination of the parts may be made by those skilled in the art without departure from the invention.

What we claim is v 1. A cap for the air-tube of a pneumatic pillow, said cap having a recess therein,'a packing disk located within said recess,

.means for retaining said disk, said means permitting relative movement between said tubular bore and attachedv to said swiveled part, and means' for preventing lateral the walls of said tubular bore when said disk is pressed against an orifice.

3. A cap for the air-tube of a pneumatic pillow, said cap having an air passageway therethrough, a packing disk located within packing disk in said passageway, said means permitting relative movement beventing lateral spreading of said disk into contact with the "walls of said passageway when said disk is pressed against an orifice or receiving a permanent spread set which would close said passageway.

4. A cap for the air-tube of a pneumatic pillow, said cap having a tubularbore, a part swiveled to said cap at one end of said bore, a packing disk, located within said tubular bore and attached to said swiveled part, and means for preventing lateral spreading of said disk into contact with the walls of said tubular bore when said disk is pressed against an orifice, said means for preventing lateral spreading ofthe packing disk being a cupped sheet metal member separate from the means for retaining the packing disk and having a flange around the periphery of the packing disk lying between the periphery of the packing disk and the'adjacent wall of the bore.

5. A cap forthe air-tube of a pneumatic pillow, said cap' having'an air passageway therethrough, a packing disk located within said passageway, means for retaining said packing disk in said passageway, said means permitting relative movement between said cap and disk, and means for preventing later 1 spreading of said disk into contact with the walls of said passageway when said disk is pressed against an orifice or receiving a permanent spread set which would close said passageway, said means for preventing lateral spreading of the packing disk being a cupped sheet-metal member separate from the means for retaining the packing disk and having a flange around the periphery of the packing disk lying between the periphery of the packing disk and the adjacent wall of the passageway.

In witness whereof, we have hereunto signed our names in the presence of two subscribing witnesses. spreading of said dlSk into contact with Witnesses! DOMINGO A. USINA, Trmononn T. SNELL.

tween said cap and disk, and means for pre-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2585667 *Nov 29, 1946Feb 12, 1952South Houston Machine CompanyValve assembly
US2590495 *Feb 21, 1947Mar 25, 1952Andre BienaimeFloat-operated draining device
US2943665 *Oct 30, 1956Jul 5, 1960Joseph W GottschlichValve lock cap
US3995653 *Aug 1, 1975Dec 7, 1976Mackal Glenn HInflation device
US5267363 *Sep 23, 1991Dec 7, 1993Chaffee Robert BPneumatic support system
US5367726 *Dec 16, 1992Nov 29, 1994Chaffee; Robert B.Pneumatic support system
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US6508264May 29, 2001Jan 21, 2003Robert B. ChaffeeValve for inflatable objects
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US7938138Nov 4, 2005May 10, 2011Robert B. ChaffeeValve for inflatable objects
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US8413674Jan 8, 2010Apr 9, 2013Robert B. ChaffeeValve with electromechanical device for actuating the valve
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US8826478Jul 24, 2012Sep 9, 2014Robert B. ChaffeeInflatable device forming mattresses and cushions
US8839474Apr 23, 2012Sep 23, 2014Robert B. ChaffeeMethod and apparatus for monitoring and controlling pressure in an inflatable device
US9086162Nov 13, 2012Jul 21, 2015Robert B. ChaffeeValve for inflatable objects
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US9279510Apr 9, 2013Mar 8, 2016Robert B. ChaffeeValve with electromechanical device for actuating the valve
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US20110167564 *Mar 28, 2011Jul 14, 2011Chaffee Robert BInflatable device with recessed fluid controller and modified adjustment device
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/234, 251/84, 251/346
Cooperative ClassificationF16K15/20