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Publication numberUS1190863 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 11, 1916
Filing dateJan 26, 1916
Priority dateJan 26, 1916
Publication numberUS 1190863 A, US 1190863A, US-A-1190863, US1190863 A, US1190863A
InventorsDenis P J Burguieres, Charles Louis Corne
Original AssigneeDenis P J Burguieres, Charles Louis Corne
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Settling-tank.
US 1190863 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. L. CORNE & D. P. J. BURG'UIRES.

4 SETTUNG TANK. v APPLICATION FILED MN.26. l9l6.

A' 1,1 90,863. ,A l Patented July 11, 1916, a SHEETS-SHEKET l.

c. Lemme & n. P. 1f u'neulEnEs.

Simms TANK. APPucm'oN man Mu'jzs. 191s. n 1,190,863. Y Patented July'll, 1916.

`l 3 SHEETS-SHEET 2,.

cHABLEs'LoUIs conne AND DBNIsr. J. BUBGUIEnEs or Louisa, Louisiana'. if

sn'irLING-TANK.

annessa.

To all whom it` may concern :V

` Be it know-nthat weo CHARLES Louis -CORNB and Denis P. J. BURGUIERES, citizens of the f United States, residin clear, and exact description of the inven-l 1@ tion, such as will enable others skilled in the at Louisa, in the .parish of St. Mary an Stateof Louisiana,

have -invented certain new and provements in Settli.ngTanks; iereby declarethe following to be a full,

art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

Our invention relates to improvements in settling tanks intended to separate solid particles from liquids, and more especially` 3 same reference symbols throughout the severalviews.

'Figure l is aplan view of the' complete settling tank,I with the supply pipe shown in section; Fig. 2 shows a vertical section along the line Q-Q of Fig. 1, and looking in the direction of the arrows; Fig. 3 is an end view, partly in section, along the line of, Fig. the arrows; Fig. 4l shows a section along the' y. line 4-4 of Fig. 2, and looking in the direc- .jaa

phragms corrugated;

trough, parts being broken away;

tion of the arrows; Fig. 5,is a detail showing a perspective view of the delivery a detail showing the trough ior the scum as detached from the apparatus; Fig. 7 is a perspective view on a larger scale showing the detachable frames carrying the cloth deflectors; Fig. 8 is a perspective view on a. larger scale showing for lregulating the overfiow into the scum trough; Fig. 9 isa .sectional View similar to Fig. 2, and shows certain of the dial Fig. 10 shows a sectionY along the line 10-10 of Fig. 9, Vand looking in the direction of the arrows, parts being broken away; Fig. 1l is a 'plan view Specica'tion. of Letters Patent.

useful Im and we do slowly,

guide blocks 1, and looking in thedirection of Y ing at its lowest 4inside of this trough Fig. 6 is the adjustable plate' Patented July 1.1,'l 191e.;k

Applicaties ined January 2e, 191s. serial No; 74,450. i

showing the arrangement of diaphragme of Figs. 9 and 10; andFig. 12

shows a modification in which the corruga- I i tions in the diaphragmsare V-shapedl and not curved. I I .i

A represents any suitable platform V or support on which theseveral settlingwtanks B, B', B2 and B3 are all pyramidal' inr shape and rectangular 1n horizontal cross-section, and the( outer tanks B and B3 have end Walls, orend' bottom plates b terminating slightly below the Atop of the side walls or .side

bottom plates b3, as shown in Fig. 2. f f

The inner bottom plates b are slightly shorter than the bottom plates b2, asshown in Fig. 2, and parallel to these bottom plates preferably in the form of metal plates, bolted to the sides b3 of the yvarious settling tanks. Secured in thesey various settling D bolted to the sides of the settlingtanks B, B and B2, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2 `In the settling tank B3 we provideinstead` of the metal. plates D, a series of removable frames E, each carrying cloth panelsy e, which frames slidein the grooves e in ,theA E', secured to the inside ofthe tank B3,.as shown in Figs. l, 2 and`7." These blocks E are secured to the .tanks kin'any convenient way, asby bolts" passing through the bolt/holes 6, see Fig-Z; At thelreceiv'- ing endl of the system we provide .an over-4 flow through F,adapted to receive the scumand Skimm'ings, which trough is preferably provided with aninclined bottom` f, exilptyfk portion f into the pipe ,G for carrying oif ther skimmings; and onlthe we provide an `adjustable plate H (see Fig..8`), adjustablyheld in of the overflow maybe-regulated within the desired limits. At the `oy'i'posite end of are mounted. y These tanks .f

the

' b2 we provide a series of diaphragmsC f 'Ityk tanks, and parallel withthese .diaphrag'ms Cy are a series of short, inclinedfmetal plates soL vplace by the clamp bolts It, so that-the depth system we .provide ya similar trough F to receive the clear liquid which is delivered. to the pipe G. The juice is suppliedxto the apparatus throughl the delivery main I, M which 1s connectedto the header I', which header is connectedpby thesrunall pipes to the distributing trough K, havingk the slot A.

tanks as sh own mostr clearly bo to 1ro y ros y' carrv oil the settlings, and the various pipes usedin the apparatus are controlled by suitable valvesin the ordinary way. The various tanks B to B3 are supported inany convenient way, as by means of the I-beanis lll and the braces N and N.

ln the modifications shown in Figs. 0,10 and ll the end partitions plates are similar to those al1-eruitv described with 'reference to Figs. 1 and 2, as also are the diaphragme plane metal plates C2 and D2, as shown in Fig. 1l.

In Fig. 12 the corrugated portions C3 ot the partition plates `and Da of the diaphragme are shown as V-shaped instead of lightly rounded at the bends,as shown in lig. 1l.

Now referring iirst'to Figs. 1 and 2, the operation of the devieeis as fol1ows:-The juice being supplied through the main l to the trough l( Hows gently through the slot It" near the bottom l; of said trough, into the First tank B, and gradually rises in the system until it reaches the level indicated by the dotted line L-L in Fig. 2.A As soon as all the tanks are lled to this level the continuous operation of the device begins. The

i `partition C, and the mud tends to settle on the end plate Z) and gradually drops to the bottom of the first tank. The liquid flows through the system in the direction of the arrows, and as the liquid passes between the various partition plates D, the mud will tend to settle' end accumulate on these plates and to drop oil, falling toward the bottom of the tank.

tank B3; but it will carry along,r with it 0er-,

tain'lighter particles, such as scale, small particles of bagasse, or 'the like, and these a separated out by the clot-h or burlan panels c, which do not screen the liquid but and (lll.

W'o have found in practice that where a merely the cloth catches the solid particles Most of the ruud and such other heavier solid pa rticlcs as still remainin `the system will drop down to the bottom othe tank B, and accumulating there may be drained oil as required. The (inal result will be that the liquid, practica-llyiclear, will flow `into the delivery troug u F', and be carried olf by the delivery pipe 'G'.

While the plates D may be permanently` attached in the settling tanks`,they may bewashed at such times as the apparatus is washed. The frames E carrying the cloth panels e should he removed from time tt time and cleaned, fresh frames bein insert ed while the soiled ones are being e eaused.

In the modification shown in Fig. 9, a still better precipitation of mud is secured, owing to the corrugated forms of the diaphragme D and D and of the separating plates C These diaphra rms form tortuous passages. which form. a. plurality of laterally connectingr troughs, and the mud tends to settle on the sides and finds its Way tothe bottom of each trough, and, flowing down the trough, falls in a thin stream to the bot toni of the corresponding tank. There will be a series of such pencil-like streams of mud between which the cleansed liquid is free to move without being contaminated by' the mud.

ln operating this system7 we depend'upon the fact that solids will separate from liq nids more rapidlyT on inclined surfaces than in the bottom of a settling tank having verti cal walls, and by the. inclined arrangement of defleetors D and E, and the inclined bots Vtoms of the tanks, we secure a much more rapid deposit of the heavier particles of solid matter from the liquid than it tanks with vertical sides were used. Moreover, by changing the direction of the current ol liquid on each side of the diaphragnns C. as shown` the tendency of the liquid to deposit the heavier solids held in suspension is fur ther increased.

It will he seen that inl this system there is a very gentle flowing oi liquid romoneend of the apparatus to the other, and the velocity of which flow is practically uniform in all of the tanks, and at all portions of each tank. thus differing from any of the systems new in use; Where the juice is pumped through'a large pipe to one tank, thus agitating the entire contents of said tank, and then is pumped through another pipe into thc sceond tank, wheres similar agitation takes place.. with the result that 'the mud is stirred up with thejuice, and the floceulates are broken up, `instead ot" being allowed to slowly settle from the juice.

By this system practically all of the mud and heavier particles:arctaken oil in the earlier oi the process oit scttlinaf:`

lll.'

`wherc the scumy may be fi iaeosea cloth and taken off near the end of the operation, the' result 'being that an extremely clear liquid product is secured.

Since it may be desirable qualities of juiceto raise or 'lower the level. of the partition between the first settling tank li and the trough F li which may be raised or louered as desired.

:Practically all of the scum ,will rise between the first plate C and theendib .of the first tank ligand may be 'conveniently removed through the trou h Fand pipe G, tered out, and the juice returned to the system in the usual .way. While we have shown-four such tanks B, B, B2 and B? it Will be obviousl that the number `of these may be increased at will, and'that more than one of said tanks may be provided with removable screens or partitions, either of cloth or metal, as desired.

" :.,obvious that all may may be plane, if desired, and that the nuni- Y,

4decreased at will.

struction, combination and from the spirit Having thus mids connected together by deep and wide means for supplyin overflow passages, with inclined baille plates parallel to each other and mounted in said tanks. and spaced above the bottoms thereot, means for supplying the `impure liquid at; one end of the system, and means for carryingofi' the clear liquid at the other end of the system, with bottom of each tank, scribed, y

2. Apparatus for Vseparating solid particles from liquids, comprising a series of setsubstantially as de- -tling tanks in the shape of inverted pyramids 'connected together by. deep and wide, overflow passages, parallel to each other and mounted in said tanks, and spaced above the bottoms thereof, the. impure liquid in a finely divided stream at one end of the system. andmeansfor carrying ofi the clear liquid at the other end ofthe system, with means for draining the bottom of each tank, substantially' as described. y An apparatus for separating solid particles from liquids, comprising a series of with f certain for `the scum and skimmings,.\ve provide theadjustable platel of the system,

means for draining the with inclined baille plates.;

'ticles from settling tanks in ther shape of inverted pyramids connected together by deep and wide overflow passages, with baille plates mount-l `.ed in said tanks and spaced above the bottoms, thereof, means pure liquid in a finely divided stream at one for suplying `the ini-y end of the systemua skimming troughprdA videdat the receiving end of the system, an

adjustable plate separating said trough from the first tank ofthe system, and means for carrying ofi' -the clear liquid at lthe other end of the system, with means for drainingthe "1.

bottom of each tank, substantially asr described.

4. An apparatus for separating solid particles from liquids, comprisingfa series .of

settling tanks in the shape of invertedy pyramids .and connected together by deep ,and

wide overflow passages,

baflie plates mount` ed in said tanks andspaced above the bot-f toms thereof, with removable clothjpanels l mounted near the delivery end of .the'sysr tem, means forvsupplying the impure yliquid in a system, and means for carrying offy the clear liquid at the other end of the system, with finely divided stream at one endroit-he a means for diai'ningthebottom of each tank, 7 l

substantially as described., Y i

5. An apparatus for separating Solid particles from liquids, comprising a seriesy o settling tanks in the shape by deep and with baille plates mounted in said tanks 'and spaced above the bottoms thereof, with removable 'cloth'pan els mounted near the delivery end of the system.

fy es y of inverted pyra- `mids and connected together wide overflow passages,

means for supplying the impure liquid ina finely divided stream atome endy at the receiving end of the system,`an adjustable plate separating said trough from the first tank of the system, and means for l carrying ofi the clear liquid-at the other end for draining the y ot' the system. with means bottom of each tank', substantially" as scribed. l

o. Ain apparatus for separating solidpara skimming trough provided i si i ticles 'from liquids, comprising a series off?" settling tanks connected together by deep" n, '115 and wide overflow passages, and eachprovided with inclined bottom walls, with baille plates above the bottoms thereof. cloth panels mounted near of the system. means rfor1 supplying the impure liquid at one end of the system, and

mounted in said tanks andspaced'ff with removable-y the delivery end 129` meansfor carrying oli' the clear liquid atr the other end-of the system. with meansnfor draining the bottom of each tank, substan'- tially as described. v y a- 7. An apparatus for separating solid parliquids, comprising'a sei'ies of settling tanks connected together, with` inclinedy corrugated baille plates paralleljtoy each other and mounted in said tanks, and

1G y nieuwe spaced nbove tbe bottoms thereof, with removable cloth poneis mounted near the deliver;T end of tbe system, ineens for supplying the impure liquid in e linel),r divided streuin at one end of the system, und ineens for cori-ying oilA the clean liquid :it the other end of the system, with means for draining the bottom of erich tank, substentitilly as described.

8. An uppurotus for .selimrating solid par ticles from liquids, comprising n series of settling tanks connected together, with inclined corrugated baille plates mounted in said tanks und spaced above the bottoms thereof, means for supplyingr the impure lquidrin :1 finely divided stream et one end of the system, end Ineens for carrying ed the clear liquid et the other end ot the sys teni, with lne-ans for draining Ale bottom of' eeen tank, substantially :is described.

9. An apparatus for separating Solid particles from liquids, comprising e series of settling tanks connected toe'ether, and ezt-ch provided with inclined bottom Walls, with `inclined baille plete-s mounted in said tanks .and spaced above the bottoms thereof, the

baille plates in one or more of Suid tanks being in the forni of plane plates, and the other baille plates being corrugated, reniovable cloth panels mounted neur tlv. delivery end of the system, ineens for supplying the impure liquid at one end ot' the system, and means onoorrying olf the clear liquid :it the other end of the system, substantially as described.

l0. An apparatus 'for sepm'nting solix. particles from liquids, comprising n series of settling tanks connected together, and each provided with inclined bottom wells. with inclined baille. plates mounted in said tanks and spaced larbove the bottoms thereof, the baille plates in one or more of Suid tanks being),r in the forni of plane. plates, and the other baille plates being corrugated, ineens for supplying the impure liquid at one end of the system, and means for carrying oil" the clear liquid at the other end of the sys tem, substantially ars described.

In testimony` whereof, we ullx our signotures.

CHARLES LOUS COREE. DENIS P. J. BURGUERES,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2573615 *May 23, 1946Oct 30, 1951Seailles Jean CharlesSettling tank
US2673451 *Nov 7, 1951Mar 30, 1954Neyrpic EtsApparatus for separating suspended material from a fluid stream
US3232438 *Feb 23, 1962Feb 1, 1966Ajems Lab IncApparatus for the separation of solids from liquid suspensions
US3272343 *Jul 3, 1963Sep 13, 1966Smith Fullerton LtdApparatus for separating liquids or solids from liquids
US3346122 *Aug 25, 1966Oct 10, 1967Shell Oil CoPlate separator with drainage gutter
US3797668 *Sep 14, 1972Mar 19, 1974Pielkenrood Vinitex BvSeparation device
US3912533 *Jul 12, 1974Oct 14, 1975Jerre P HeyerMaple sugar processing apparatus
US3923659 *Jul 29, 1974Dec 2, 1975Otto & Co Gmbh Dr CApparatus for processing flushing liquor from a gas main of coke ovens
US3928209 *Sep 3, 1974Dec 23, 1975Enso Gutzeit OyLaminated settler
US3972819 *Nov 7, 1974Aug 3, 1976Pielkenrood-Vinitex B.V.Coalescence apparatus
US4046698 *Apr 14, 1976Sep 6, 1977Pielkenrood-Vinitex B.V.Coalescence apparatus
US4054529 *Aug 26, 1974Oct 18, 1977Pulkenrood-Vinitex B.V.Device for treating a suspension
US4067813 *Apr 17, 1975Jan 10, 1978Pielkenrood-Vinitex B.V.Compound separation device
US4526691 *Dec 10, 1982Jul 2, 1985William MelisSeparator apparatus
US4737288 *Mar 18, 1985Apr 12, 1988Envirotech CorporationSeparator apparatus
US5503747 *Jun 29, 1994Apr 2, 1996DegremontDevice for treating waste water especially rainwater
US6669849 *Sep 8, 1995Dec 30, 2003Orica Australia Pty LtdWater treatment process
US7357860 *Jan 23, 2006Apr 15, 2008Painter Paul WSkimmer system
US7364664 *Jul 24, 2002Apr 29, 2008Sharp Kabushiki KaishaForeign matter removing mechanism, fluid flow processing equipment, and foreign matter removing method
US7540965Apr 2, 2004Jun 2, 2009Orica Australia Pty LtdProcess for treating concentrated salt solutions containing DOC
US7763666Jul 28, 2005Jul 27, 2010Orica Australia Pty Ltd.Plug-flow regeneration process
US8087518 *Sep 27, 2010Jan 3, 2012Ecodigm Co., Ltd.Rectangular sedimentation system having self-aggregation facility
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/294, 126/383.1, 210/521
Cooperative ClassificationB01D21/0045, B01D21/2427, B01D21/245, B01D21/0003, B01D21/0069, B01D21/0093, B01D21/0057
European ClassificationB01D21/00N4, B01D21/00N12, B01D21/24C, B01D21/00N20, B01D21/00B, B01D21/24N, B01D21/00W