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Publication numberUS1196453 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 29, 1916
Filing dateApr 28, 1916
Priority dateApr 28, 1916
Publication numberUS 1196453 A, US 1196453A, US-A-1196453, US1196453 A, US1196453A
InventorsMattie R Hatfield
Original AssigneeMattie R Hatfield
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe-cleaning attachment for automobiles, &c.
US 1196453 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

IVI. R. HATFIELD.

SHOE CLEANING ATTACHMENT FOR AUTOMOBILES, c.

APPLICATION FILED APII.2B, I9Ie. A

` LTOOACO. Pmmmdmg. 29,1916.

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MATTIE R. HATFIELD, OF .WICHITA, KANSAS.

SHOE-CLEANING ATTACHMENT FOB, AUTOMOBILES, &c.

Specication of Letters Patent.

Patented Aufl". 29, 1916.

Application filed April 28, 1916. Serial No. 94,152.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, MATTIE R. I'IATFJELD, a citizen of the United States, residing at I'Vichita, in the county of Sedgwick and State of Kansas, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Shoe-Cleaning Attachments for Automobiles, &c.; and I hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, which form part of this specification.

This invention is a novel improvement in shoe cleaning or wiping devices for automobiles; and its object is to provide a simple attachment which can be readily secured to and beneath the step, or running board, of an ordinary automobile; and when it is desired to use the cleaner it can be readily projected from beneath the step into position for use; and after use it can be readily pushed back out of the way under the step, and be concealed when not in use and while the vehicle is being transported.

The attachment is eilicient, sightly, and compact.

I will explain the invention as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, which illus trate one practical embodiment thereof; and will set forth in the claims the essential features of the invention and combinations of parts for which protection is desired.

In the drawings: Figure l is a view showing the position of the device when attached to an automobile step. Fig. 2 is an enlarged top plan view of the attachment detached, with the drawer open and brush ready for use. Fig. 3 is a side view of the attachment as applied to a step, with the drawer open. Fig. it is a longitudinal section through the attachment Fig. 2 on line 4 4, closed. Fig. 5 is a transverse section on line 5-5 Fig. 4. Figs. G and 7 are details.

rIhe attachment comprises an outer casing l, preferably made of sheet metal and open at top and front and closed at back and sides; the sides have top flanges l, and front flanges 1b. The sides are also provided with longitudinal slots lc for a purpose herein after explained. In the bottom of the box may be one or more openings le. This casing is adapted to be secured to and under the running board or step S of an automobile, or other vehicle, as indicated in F l; and may be fastened thereto in any suitable way, preferably by means of hanger straps at front, and by bolts or screws 2 extending through the running board and through openings lr in the flanges la, if desired. The hanger straps are attached to the front flanges l" and have upper horizontal parts 3 adapted to engage and overlie the front upper edge of the step, as shown in Fig. 4E and the vertical portions 3 of these hangers may be riveted to the flanges Ilb so as to per* manently secure same thereto. By means of these hangers the front end of the casing, (whereupon the greatest strain is exerted when the brush is used) is securely suspended from the step. The upper ends 3 of the hanger may if desired be let into lerfs or notches in the top step; and they can be conveniently fastened to the step by means of screw-bolts 3C tapped through brackets 3f secured to the sides of the box beneath flanges l and adjacent the front flanges 1b "t (see Figs. 3, 5 and 6) so that the screws can be conveniently manipulated.

If desired the lower ends of the hangers 3 may be extended rearwardly beneath the lower ends of the flanges l", as indicated at 3e, and these extended portions 3e may be connected to the sides of the box by means of angle-irons 3g riveted to the parts 3C and adjacent sides of the box as shown in Fig. 6.

blidably mounted within the casing l, so as to telescope therewith, is a box or drawer d which is preferably made of sheet metal and may be closed at front and rear. Preferably a plate a is attached to the front end. of drawer d and extends sul'liciently to project over and cover the end flanges l1 of the casing when the drawer d is closed and said plate may be exteriorly linished or decorated in any desired manner.

The drawer il is preferably made of sheet metal, and its front edge may serve as a scraper. Its sides are preferably concaved or notched as at 4: near its front end, and between such concave portions 4b, and extending transversely of the drawer, is a brush or brushes 5 which may be of any suitable kind and placed in the drawer between the concave portions Il" of the sides thereof, but the brush need not extend more than half the length of the drawer and, if desired, it can be removably secured in the drawer by any suitable means. As shown the drawer is provided with a transverse partition le against which'the inner edge or side of the brush lies, the brush being held between the partition l and the front end of the drawer. As shown the brush 5 is a lli concave brush having a wooden back 5a adapted to easily fit in the front compartment of the drawer. The brush may have openings in it so as to permit dirt to work out through the brush and escape through they opening lG if desired, and its sides may be slightly tapered, as shown, so that dirt can work down and pass out through the opening le. Any other suitable kind of brush or brushes may be used.

rlhe drawer el is preferably made slightly narrower at bottom than at top so that if any dirt should fall out of the drawer into the casing it would work down and escape through openings le, and the drawer not become chocked in the casing.

To prevent the drawer being entirely withdrawn from the casing it may be slightly retained therein by any suitable meansy preferably by thumb-bolts 6 which are adapted to pass through the slots 1 in the sides of the casing and through apertures in the sides of the drawer and have reduced threaded portions 6a that engage nuts 6b inside the drawer, see Figs. 2 and 7. The bolts 6 are shouldered so that they can tightly engage with thenuts without binding in the slots 1F. If desired sleeve rollers 6 may be placed on the enlarged portions of the bolts between their heads and threadedk ends, so that these rollers will act as guides inthe slots l", and will not be bound against rotation by the tightening of the bolts 6.

The drawer may be provided with any suitable means to hold the drawer in closed position, when it is not desired to use same: a catch 7 being indicated adapted to engage a keeper 7L attached to the step.

It will be seen that the device can be readily attached to the step of an automobile in the most convenient position for use by persons entering or leaving the same.V

When it is desired to use the brush the catch 7 is disengaged and the drawer drawn outward to the limit permitted by the slots l43 (see Figs. 2 and 3) which will permit persons to clean their shoes by drawing them across the brush, longitudinally of the step. After the shoes are cleaned the drawer can be pushed inward by the foot, and the catch will hold the drawer closed until it is again desired to use the brush.

What I claim is:

l. A brush holding attachment for automobiles and the like comprising a casing adapted to be suspended beneath and from a vehicle step or running board, a drawer slidably mounted in said casing and having its sides notched, a brush in the drawer between the notched portions of the sides thereof whereon shoes can be wiped by draw- 'ing same transversely across the drawer, and

meansto retain the drawer in the casing.

2. Abrush holding attachment for automobiles and the like comprising a casing adapted to be suspended beneath and from a vehicle step or running board and having longitudinal slots in its sides and an opening in its bottom, a drawer slidably mounted in said casing and having an opening in its bottom adapted to register with the opening in the casing when the drawer is closed, a cleaning device in the drawer, and means attached to the drawer to engage said slots and retain the drawer in the casing.

3; A brush holding attachment for automobiles and the like comprising a casing adapted to be suspended beneath and from a vehicle step or running board and having longitudinal slots in its sides and an opening in its bottom, a drawer slid ably mounted in said casing and having a plate on its front end adapted to cover the front of the casing when the drawer is closed, the sides of the said drawer being notched, a brush in the drawer adjacent and extending between the notched portion of the sides thereof, and means attached to the drawer to engage said slots and retain the drawer i'n the casing.

4. A brush holding attachment for automobiles and the like comprising a metallic casing having hanger straps adapted to engage the front edge of the step and suspend the casing therefrom, clamping bolts attached to the casing adjacent the hangers adapted to engage the underside of the step and secure the casing in position, a slidable drawer mounted in said casing, a cleaning device in the drawer, means for limiting the withdrawal of the drawer from the casing, and means for holding the drawer in closed position.

5. A brush holding attachment for automobiles and the like comprising a metallic casing having slots in its sides, hanger straps attached to the front of the vcasing and adapted to engage the front edge of the step and suspend the casing therefrom, a slidablc drawer mounted in said casing, a brush secured in the drawer, means attached to the drawer and engaging the slots in the casing for limiting the withdrawal of the drawer from the casing, and means for holding the drawer in closed position.

6. A brush holding attachment for automobiles and the like comprising a metallic casing having front and side flanges and` slots in its sides, hanger straps attached to the front flanges of the casing and adapted to engage the front edge of the step and suspend the casing therefrom, a slidable drawer mounted in said casing having notched sides, a brush secured in the drawer intermediate the said notched sides, means engaging the slots for limiting the withdrawal of the drawer from the casing, and means for holding the drawer in closed position.

7. A brush holding attachment for automobiles and the like comprising a easing having flanged sides and front ends, and longitudinal slots in its sides; clamp plates attached to the front ianges of the casing adapted to hang over the edge of the step and suspend the front edge of the casing thereunder, bolts attached to the easing adjacent the clamps to secure the easing in place7 a drawer slidably mounted in said casing and having a front compartment, the

sides of this compartment being notched, bolts transfixing the slots and engaging the sides of the casing and secured to the sides of the drawer to retain the drawer in the casing, a brush in said compartment, and means for retaining the drawer in closed position.

In testimony that I claim the foregoing as my own, I affix my signature.

MATTIE R. ITIATFIELD.

Copies oi this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. C.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6076222 *Feb 17, 1998Jun 20, 2000Jolly; William A.Athletic shoe cleaner
US6256830Nov 8, 1999Jul 10, 2001William A. JollyAthletic shoe cleaner
US6301739 *Aug 24, 1999Oct 16, 2001Fernando A. CazauxRetractable shoe cleaning device for a vehicle
US6363567 *Jan 31, 2000Apr 2, 2002Jay J. WoodwardVehicle mounted retractable golf shoe brush
US6374449Mar 22, 2000Apr 23, 2002William A. JollyAthletic shoe cleaner
US6553603Apr 4, 2000Apr 29, 2003William A. JollyAthletic shoe cleaner
US6912754 *Apr 2, 2003Jul 5, 2005Gerald D. KunkleGolf shoe brush
US8132848May 6, 2010Mar 13, 2012Samuel KnightVehicle mounted brush for footwear
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/164.2, 15/161, 224/42.32
Cooperative ClassificationB60R3/04