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Publication numberUS1197026 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 5, 1916
Filing dateSep 30, 1909
Priority dateSep 30, 1909
Publication numberUS 1197026 A, US 1197026A, US-A-1197026, US1197026 A, US1197026A
InventorsJoseph L Hiller
Original AssigneeJoseph L Hiller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for the economical and advantageous employment of crushing or pulverizing machines.
US 1197026 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. L. 'HILLER.

METHOD FOR THE ECONOMICAL AND ADVANTAGEOUS EMPLOYMENT 0F CRUSHING 0R PULVERIZ ING MACHINES. APPLICATION FILED SEPT. 30. I909.

Joseph L.Hi|lcr JOSEPH L. H ILLER, OF MATTAPOISETT, MASSACHUSETTS.

METHOD FOR THE ECONOMICAL AND ADVANTAGEOUS EMPLOYMENT OF CRUSHIN G 0R PULVERIZING MACHINES.

Specification of Letters Patent.

I Patented Sept. 5, 1916.

Application filed September 30, 1909. Serial No. 520,386.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, JOSEPH L. HILLER, a citizen of the United States, residing at Mattapoisett, in the county of Plymouth and State of Massachusetts, have invented new and useful Improvements in Methods for the Economical and Advantageous Employment of Crushing or Pulverizing Machines, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to a method for the economical and advantageous employment of crushing or pulverizing machines wherein the hammers or heaters are caused to rotate with high velocity inthe cylinder into which the materialis introduced to be reduced, such for example, as is illustrated in the Letters Patent granted to myself and George W. Borton, No. 896,019, dated August 11, 1908. Heretofore, it has been the practice in the construction and use of machines of this general type, to provide what are known in the practical art, as hammer-drums, consisting of carriers fixed to rotate upon an axle and provided with radially disposed pivoted hammers, and because, in actual use, the hammers wear down to a point of inefliciency, thehammer carriers or disks have been provided with several sets of perforations or openings, arranged at different radial distances from the center of rotation of thedrum, for at tachment of the hammers, so that when the hammers become worn they may be removed and secured to the carriers or disks' by devices passing through a series of holes more remote from the center of rotation. This construction of the hammer-drum in the practical use of the machines results, by reason of the several sets of openings or perforations in the hammer-carriers, in materially weakening such carriers with liability of .breakage thereof. The construction is expensive because of the provision of the several sets or series of-holes. The several sets of radially disposed holes are also a source of inconvenience, because of the possibility of error of the workman in assembling the hammers. These hammerdrums comprise a very large number of individual hammers, and each disk or hammer carrier. has a large number of holes elements of the hammer-drum, or in subse quently readjusting the hammers, becoming readjustment of the hammers.

confused, or because of carelessness, attaching some one or more series of the ham- .mers to the carriers through the medium of inappropriate holes, necessitating waste of time in correcting the error; and when such error occurs in readjustment of the hammers to compensate for wear-thereof, a material loss of work results, as it has been the practice to remove the hammer-drum from the machine for the purpose of such In all cases the time of the workman in assembling the elements of the hammer-drum is materially increased by the necessity of accurate selection of the holes in the 'several'sets for proper attachment of the carriers. I

I avoid all the foregoing hammer-carriers. .The series of holes inthe hammer-carriers 1n each hammer-drum,

however, are arranged at different distances from the center of rotation, of the hammerdrum. This may be accomplished by having the hammer-carriers of each hammerdrum of the same diameter, but with the single series of hammer-attaching holes therein arranged at difi'erent radial distances from the center of rotation and at different radial distances from the circumference of the disks or carriers, or by pro- 1 viding hammer-drums the hammer carriers whereof are of different diameter and the single set of hammer, attaching holes of which are the same distance from the peripheral edge or circumference but at different distances from the center of rotation. I prefer the latter construction, and have illustrated my invention as soembodied.

In addition to avoiding weakness of the hammer-carriers or disks, and securing economy of manufacture thereof by the provision of a single set or series of hammer-attaching openings, my invention enables the elements of the hammer-drums tobe assembled quickly and accurately, as there is no room for error of the workman, ,such as has been above indicated, and the interchange or substitution of the hammers in the several machines may be quickly effected with a minimum interruptionof the use ofthe machine. 7

The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein I have illustrated its carrying .out by a set of three machines whereof the carriers of the hammer" drums are of different diameter, the single set of hammer-attaching holes whereof are at different distances from the center of rotation of the hammer-drum.

In said drawing, Figure 1 is a view partly in section, and partly in elevation, showing so are of less length than the hammers shown in Fig 1. Fig. 3 is a View similar -to Fig.

2 wherein the hammer-carriers of the hammer-drum are of'still greater diameter, and the hammer-attaching holes whereof are arranged at still greater distance from the center of rotation of the hammer-drum, the hammers of which are of correspondingly less length.

Referring now tosaid drawing, the cylin- 40 der of the machine, as usual, consists of a pivoted grinding surface or cage 1, and a top or cover section-1 but my invention is not limited to machines having a cylinder of this particular type. The cylinders .in

4.5 the several machines shown in the drawings are ofequal diameter or dimensions.

2 designatesthe hammer-drum shafts of the machines. The machines illustrated arev provided with hammer-drums consisting of '50 hammer-carriers (designated 3 in Fig. 1) connected for rotation with the shaft 2, as

by. means of keys 7, and provided with a single set ofhammer-attachin holes arranged at a predetermined radial' distance .55 from the center of rotation of thehammerdrum, dependent upon the diameter of the cylinder and the length of the hammers, so

that the free ends of the hammers may rotate in the proper path with relation to the cylinder for effecting the grinding or crushiiig. 'The hammers are designated by the numeral 5, and are provided at their inner ends with holes 6 adapted to be brought into register with the holes. 4 of the hammer-caree riers 3, and piv'otally secured thereto by means of rods or bolts 8 which pass through the registering holes in the several hammercarriers. The carriers and hammers and the shafts by which they are carriedmake up the composite hammer-drum.

'lfhenumeral 3 designates the hammercarriers of the hammer-drum adapted and proportioned for the machine shown in Fig. 2, which hammer-carriers are of greater diameter, and the-hammer-attaching holes whereof are arranged at a greater distance from the center of rotation of the hammerdrum, dependent upon the degree to which,

the hammers initially employed in the machine of Fig. 1, after they have become ineflicient for the purpose of. the machine shown in said Fig. 1, have been reduced and dressed for use in the machine shown in Fig. 2, so that the free ends of the hammers will rotate in a proper path for efficient grinding in the latter. For convenience the reduced hammers of the hammer-drum shown in Fig. 2 meral 5 3" designates the hammer-carriers of the hammer-drum for the machine shown in Fig. 3, and these hammer carriers are of greater diameter, and the hammer-attaching holes thereinare arranged at greaterdistance from are designated by the nuthe center ofrotation of the hammer-drum than the corresponding parts shownin Fig.

2,'and the hammers 5 attached thereto are of le% length than those illustrated in Fig. 2, depicting the degree of reduction in the length of said hammers after they have become inefficient for\use in the ma ine shown in Fig. 2, and have been removed from the hammer-drum of that machine, dressed'and" incorporated as elements of the hammer-drum shown in Fig. 3.

In practising my invention employing three'machines, which number I have adoptedfor convenience of explanation, when the hammers of the hammer-drum shown'in the machine of Fig. 1, have become worn to the point of inefficiency for usein said machine,-

the hammer-drum may be removed from said preferably reduced in length and dressed to the proper degree and attached to the hammer carriers of the machine shown in Fig. 2 having larger-hammer-carriers or the hammer-atta'ching holes of which are arranged at greater distance from the center of rotation, and new hammers of full length'incorporated with the hammer-carriers 3, for

J use in the machine-shown in Fig. 1 and so, likewise, when the hammers of the hammerdrum shown in Fig. 2 have become worn to 'the point of inefliciency foruse in that machine, the said hammer-drum may be removed therefrom, the hammers detached, re-

duced,dressed and incorporated as elements of the hammer carriers J of the machine machine, the hammers detached therefrom,

shown in Fig. 3, and this practice may be 1267' extended throughout a large number of machines. x

The practice of the described method enables the employment of hammer-drums the carriers of which are of maximum strength, of less expense than those heretofore utilized, and the elements of which may be quickly and accurately assembled, either initially or for the purpose of interchange, because it is necessary to have only a single set) of hammer-attaching holes.

The method is also capable of being carried out in the operation of a single machine by providing in the complement of the machine several sets of' hammer-drums, the hammer-attaching holes of the carrier or disk whereof are arranged at different distances from the center of rotation of the hammer-drums, in which carrying out, again referring to the figures of the drawings for convenience, when the original length hammers shown in Fig. 1, are worn to the point of inefliciency the hammer-drum may be removed, the hammers detached, reduced in length, dressed and then attached to the hammer-carriers or disks 3*- of Fig. 2, having holes arranged at greater distance from the center of rotation, and this hammer-- drum introduced into the machine shown in- Fig. -1,'and again when the hammers of this hammer-drum become worn to the point of may be removed, the hammers detached, reduced and secured to the hammer-carriers 3 illustrated in Fig. 3, having attaching holes arranged at still greater distance from the center of' rotation, and this drum then introduced in the machine shown in Fig. 1.

.Having thus described is claimed is, .7

'1; The method of employment of crushing the invention, what and pulverizing machines of the rotating in" a crushing cylinder, which consists in periodically removing the hammers fromcarriers having attaching means located at one distance from the center thereof, and attaching them to carriers provided with attaching means located at a greater distance from the center thereof, and introducing the same into a crushing cylinder for operation with the active crushing ends of the hammers sustaining the same relation to the crushing cylinder as originall 2. A crushing or pulverizing plant consisting of a series of two or more units, each of said units comprising a crushing cylinder, a rotating hammer carrier and ham mers pivotally carried thereby, said hammer carriers provided with means for attachment of the hammers so located that said hammers are capable of being interchanged, as they become worn, from the first unit in said series through they succeeding unit ,or units of the series with their tips in the same relation to the crushing cylinders of each unit.

3. A crushing or pulverizing plant, con-- sisting of a series of two or more units, each of said units comprising a crushing cylinder, a rotating hammer carrier and hammers pivotally carried thereby, with the pivotal connection of said hammers increasing in distance from their axis of rotation in each succeeding unit of said series.

In testimony whereof Ihave hereunto. set my hand in presence of two subscribing witmesses.-

JOSEPH L. HILLER. 'Witnesses:

ARTHUR L. BRYANT,

GEO. W. Rm.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4028795 *Jul 8, 1975Jun 14, 1977Riken Keikinzoku Kogyo Kabushiki KaishiMethod of manufacturing extruded structural profiles from aluminum based metal scraps
Classifications
U.S. Classification241/301, 241/192, 241/154, 241/191
Cooperative ClassificationB02C19/18