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Publication numberUS1201100 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1916
Filing dateJan 12, 1916
Priority dateJan 12, 1916
Publication numberUS 1201100 A, US 1201100A, US-A-1201100, US1201100 A, US1201100A
InventorsMabel S Rice-Wray
Original AssigneeMabel S Rice-Wray
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus.
US 1201100 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

M. S. RlCE-WRAY.

GAME APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED JAN. 12. I916.

Patented Oct. 10,1916.

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M. S. RICE-WRAY.

GAME APPARATUS.

APP L!CATION FILED JAN.12,I9I6.

1,201,100. Patented Oct. 10, 1916.

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GAME APPARATUS.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Oct. 10, 1916.

Application filed January 12, 1916. Serial No. 71,632.

To all whom it may concern I Be it known that I, MABEL S. RIcE-VVRAY, a citizen of the United States of America,

residing at Detroit, in the county of Wayne andState of Michigan, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Game Apparatus, of which the following is a specification, reference being had'therein to the accompanying drawings.

This invention relates to a game apparatus and may be styled synonym golf as the underlying principle of the ordinary outdoor game of golf is embodied in my game apparatus, together with certain educational features which lend novelty to the game apparatus and exercise the mental faculties of participants of the game.

An object of my invention is to provide a simple, durable and inexpensive game of the above type which will test the skill of players, amuse juveniles, and increase or invigorate the mentality of a player as to synonymous words, thereby bringing together different lines of diversion or amusement conducive to an interesting game.

The construction of the game apparatus, its appurtenant parts, rules and other matters relating thereto will be hereinafter specifically described and then claimed, and reference will now be had to the drawings, wherein Figure 1 is a plan of the game apparatus; Fig. 2 is a cross sectional view of the same, taken on the line IIII of Fig. 1, showing the lid or cover of the apparatus in position; Fig. 3 is a longitudinal sectional View of the apparatus taken on the line IIIIII of Fig. 1; Fig. 4 is a plan of one set of cards used in connection with the apparatus showing the faces thereof; Fig. 5 illustrates in plan the rear faces of a few of the cards shown in Fig. 4; Fig. 6 is a plan of a series of one of the cards shown in Fig. 4, and Fig. 7 is an elevation of a pawn of which there is a series forming part of the game apparatus.

The apparatus comprises a board, plat or table piece 1, that is rectangular in plan and provided with side walls 2 and end walls 3 and 4, thereby providing an inclosure having the formation of a fiat boX or casing which can be conveniently closed by a lid or cover 5. In the box, on the bottom thereof, are longitudinally disposed parallel field pieces 6 providing alleys 7 at the 7 side walls 2 and wells 8 between said field pieces, said wells being defined by transverse spacing members 9 at the end walls 8' and intermediate the ends of the field pieces.

Each field piece has a longitudinal division line 10 and transverse spacing lines 11 providing spaces 12, in two rows extending from one end of the field piece to the opposite end thereof. Certain of these spaces 12 are cut away to provide rectangular holes or pockets 13 and the bottom of each hole is formed or closed by the bottom of the box. The holes 13 are of less length than the spaces 12 thereby providing clearance at either end of a hole for a number, whereby the holes may be consecutively numbered by starting at one end of the field piece and returning to the same end after traversing both columns of spaces. As clearly shown in Fig. 1 there are fifteen holes and in the spaces adjacent the holes there are printed orotherwise marked sentences or verses each containing a Word having one or more synonyms. In the hole is printed or otherwise marked the particular word of the sentence or verse having one or more synonyms and these sentences or verses are appropriated from well known literature and are instructive in themselves.

Each field piece has a home space 14, so designated, at the foot of the column of spaces containing the last-or fifteenth hole of the field. The field pieces are identical in construction but are arranged the reverse of each other whereby participants of the game sit at each end of the apparatus and easily observe matter on the field pieces. It is to be noted that the sentences or verses used in connection with one field piece are different from the, sentences or verses of the other field piece, consequently a greater number ofprominent words and synonyms.

An end of each of the alleys 7 is provided with spaces 15 defined by division lines 16 and said spaces are numerically numbered. At the opposite end of each alley is a defined space 17 for a counterpawn 18, preferably in the form of a ring or annulus made of wood and adapted to be projected or shot along the alley to rest in one of the spaces 15 by reaching said space direct or by rebounding from the end wall of the alley.

When the game apparatus is intended for two players, it has two sets of cards, a third of a set being shown in Fig. 4. There are three cards for each of the holes 13 of each field piece,'consequently there are fortyfive cards and each third of the set have the backfaces consecutively numbered as shown in Fig. 5, to correspond to the numbering of the holes 13. The cards are designated 19 and the front face of each card is printed or otherwise marked to display a word and the definition or synonym of the word. The word on each card is a synonym of theword in the hole of the field piece where the cards belong and in order that this may be accurately determined it is only necessary to refer to the back face of the card to observe if the number on the back of the card corresponds to the number of the hole. For instance, consider the fifteenth hole and the sentence associated therewith reading, lVe should never withhold reparation when we know we arewrong. Referring now to Fig. 4 it will'be observed that the fifteenth card, (lowermost card) contains a synonym of the word reparation and the fifteenth card containing the the field pieces.

word restitution can be readily placed in the fifteenth hole and the tsentence completed by this particular synonym of reparation.

A game apparatus intended for more than two players may include numerous sets of cards.

Besides the counterpawns 18, there are player-pawns 20, one for each participant of the game, and these player-pawns are preferably in the form of miniature golf players and of such size as to be conveniently moved from one space to another on These player-pawns, as well as the set of cards will be distinguished by color, the player-pawns and cards of. one player differing in color from the playerpawns and cards of another player. The

wells 8 may also be colored to identify sets of cards therewith, and as shown in Fig. 1, sets of cards are placed in eachwell, face up, whereby the cards can be easily read.

' Assuming that two persons are to participate in a game, one of the players shoots or projects a counterpawn in the alley and assuming that the counter-pawn comes to rest in number five space of the alley, then H the player places a player-pawn on the fifth space toward hole number one.

This constitutes the move of one player and the opponent now has a chance for hole number one of his or her field. Should the opponent .be successful in placing the counter-pawn in the space numbered seven of h1s or her alley, it is then necessary for opponent to read the sentence or verse assoclated with hole number one, and having done so, it is 1 next necessary for the opponent to select a synonym card from opponents well and place the same in hole number one. The first player now has a chance to reach hole number one of his or her field if successful thus advancing the player-pawn to hole number one and the player must read the sentence or verse aloud and place a synonym card therein. Such moves or plays, as in dicated above, are continued by the players until each of the fifteen holes receives a card and the player-pawn reaches the home space, thus indicating that one player has won the game.

In making the plays or moves the following or similar rules are enforced: First, should the counter-pawn come to rest'on a numbered space larger than required for a move, the player loses his or her turn until the next play. Second, should the counter-pawn come to rest leaning against the walls of the alley, the player loses his or her turn. Third, a straight shot or rebound of the counter-pawn counts provid ing it does not rest exactly half in one space and half in another. Should the counter-pawn come to rest more in one space than theother, it counts in accordance with the space into which the greater part projects, and should the counter-pawn rest exactly on a division line with one half in one space and one-half in another, the player may take his or her turn over. Fourth, should a player neglect to read the sentence or verse at each hole, when reaching the same, the player forfeits his or her right to another turn. Fifth, each player having successfully reached a hole, correctly placed a synonym card therein, is entitled to another turn. Sixth, an opponent may examine the cards of a player placed in the holes to determine if proper synonyms have been selected. This may bechecked by comparing numbers on the back of the cards with the numbers at the holes. Seventh should a player place a wrong synonym card in a hole, the player must start over again, and if having passed a number of holes, the cards are removed therefrom and placed in the well. Eighth, each player takes his or her turn in regular order, first on one side and then on the other and after a game has been won, adversaries change sides or switch the game board around so that the participants at a game may have a chance at both golf fields. Ninth, should a player be privileged to move a greater number of spaces than exists between two holes, then the player-pawn is advanced such spaces providing the player reads thesentence or verse aloud and selects a proper synonym card for the hole. Tenth, four or six persons can play, choosing partners for opposite sides, the partners using individual player-pawns and the synonym cards of their well.

From the foregoing it will be observed that a game apparatus as defined above provides a very interesting game and the rules or regulations governing the same may be varied in many instances, according to the age of the participants. For instance, for juveniles numbers alone may be used for placing cards in their proper hole, whereas with adults it is essential that the sentences or verses be read and proper synonyms useoi in order to incorporate the educational feature in the game.

The game board may be constructed of strong and durable cardboard and of such size as may be conveniently held upon the lap of participants in a game. With the game apparatus in the form of a box, as shown in Fig. 2, the lid or cover prevents the cards and pawns from becoming accidentally displaced, and directions may be printed in the wells of the board or upon the lid or cover.

One embodiment of my invention has been illustrated and described, but it is to be understood that the structural elements are susceptible to such modifications and variations as fall within the scope of the appended claims.

hat I claim is 1. A game apparatus comprising a board provided with separate alleys, wells, and sets of holes, cards adapted to be placed in the holes of said board, player pawns adapted to be moved from one hole to another, and counter-pawns movable in said alleys adapted to govern the placing of said cards in the board holes and the movement of said player-pawns.

2. A game apparatus comprising a board provided with sets of spaced holes, cards adapted to be placed in the board holes, player-pawns adapted to be moved from one hole to another, and counter-pawns adapted to govern the placing of cards in the board holes and the movements of the player pawns.

3. A game apparatus comprising a board provided with sets of spaced holes, playerpawns adapted to be moved between the holes of said board, cards adapted to'be placed in the holes of said board, and chance devices adapted to govern the placing of cards in the board holes and the movement of player-pawns between the holes of said board.

4. A game apparatus comprising a board having field pieces provided with spaced consecutively numbered holes, said board having wells between said field pieces and alleys at the outer edges thereof, consecutively numbered cards adapted to be held in the wells of said board and transferred to the holes of said field pieces, player-pawns adapted to be moved between the holes of said field pieces, and chance devices movable in said alleys adapted to govern the placing of said cards and the movement of said pawn pieces.

5. A game apparatus comprising a board provided with sets of holes,indicia about each hole including a word having a synonym, sets of cards having words thereon as synonyms of words associated with the indicia of said holes, and chance devices adapted to govern the placing of saidcards in the holes of said board.

6. A game apparatus comprising a board having sets of holes consecutively numbered, indicia about each hole including a word in each hole capable of havin a synonym, sets of cards consecutively num ered on one face and having the opposite faces thereof provided with words as synonyms of the words in the holes of said board, player-pawns adapted to be moved between said board holes, and chance devices adapted to govern the placing of said cards and the movement of said player-pawns.

7. A game apparatus comprising a box, field pieces therein provided with holes, said box having alleys and wells therein, indicia about each hole including a word in each hole capable of having a synonym, sets of cards in the wells of said box having words thereon as synonyms of the words in the holes of said field pieces, player-pawns adapted to be moved over said field pieces, and counter-pawns adapted to be moved in the alleys of said box and govern the placing of said cards and the movement of said player-pawns.

game apparatus having indicia in cluding words of which there are synonyms, cards having thereon words as synonyms of the first mentioned words and adapted to be placed over said words, and a chance device adapted to govern the placing of said cards in connection with said indicia.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

MABEL S. RIGEWRAY.

Witnesses ANNA M. Donn, KARL H. BUTLER.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents.

Washington, I). G.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3512779 *Nov 22, 1967May 19, 1970Mcgaughey William H T JrGame apparatus with cards played in alignment across a board
US3649023 *May 28, 1968Mar 14, 1972Schohn WilhelminaMethod of playing a game wherein cards cover board sections
US3952423 *Mar 14, 1975Apr 27, 1976Gentry Dale RBible board game
US4666161 *Jan 10, 1985May 19, 1987Elesie Louis DWord definition game including a race track board
US5120066 *May 6, 1991Jun 9, 1992Cohen Jack LMethod of playing a thesaurus game
US5505456 *Apr 14, 1994Apr 9, 1996Schmidt; JohnBoard game for evaluating skill in scrambling and unscrambling of words
US5681042 *Jun 7, 1995Oct 28, 1997Dream Makers, Inc.Game board apparatus
US7341252Jun 6, 2005Mar 11, 2008Shawn JacklinBoard game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/282.1, 273/277, 273/272, 273/236
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00574