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Publication numberUS1203166 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 31, 1916
Filing dateJun 27, 1914
Priority dateJun 27, 1914
Publication numberUS 1203166 A, US 1203166A, US-A-1203166, US1203166 A, US1203166A
InventorsBernard D Willis
Original AssigneeAutomatic Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Semi-automatic telephone system.
US 1203166 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

B. D. WLLS.

SEMI-AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE SYSTEME APPLlc/mos man maiz?. 1314 1,203,1 66. Patented ont. 31,1916.

.www @@4433 ATTOEM: ve Y B. D WILLIS.

SEMLAUTOMATIC TELEPHONE SYSTEM. APPLICATIo msn lunz 21. 19H.

1,203,166. Patented 0er. 31,1916.

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SEMi-AUUMATIC TELEPHONE SYSTEM. APPLIcAmN men xuNE 21. 1914.

1,203,166. Patented 001311916.

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UNITED STATES .P ATENT OFFICE.

BERNARD D. WILLXS, 0F CHICAGO. ILLINGS, ASSIGNOR T0 AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC COMPAIIY, DE CHICAGO, ILLINOE, A CORPORATION QFIILLINOIS.

SEMI-AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE SYSTEM.

Application filed June 27, 1914.

To mil Hallum it 11mg/ fome/"n:

Be it known that l, Buurman l). lllimiis, a citizen ol the United States of America, and resident ol' lhicago, Cook county.y Illi-` nois, have invented certain new and useful l`mpro \'eimnts in Se1nii\utomatie `Tclcphone Systems. nl which the following is a specification.

My inwntiol'; ii'lacs to improvements in semi-antomatie telephonisj'stcnis and :e lates particularly to the means for pei-mib ting an operator to supervise a long; distance or toll connection.

Heretoiore it hasA heen customaiwY for aI subscriber in establishing a toll connection to first call thc toll operator, who then sets up the connection, By my invention. however, the connection is first set up automatically "by lthe snhscriher, and the opera tor is not brought into the connection until. the called subscriber answers', at which time the operator can malte a record ol' the call and make the proper charges against the su h sc ri he r..

My invention will he more elf-arl)7 undci stood h i reference to the acconnranying drawings.4 in which l, have illustrated one en'ihodinicnt of in r intention in ionucctiou with an automatic system enniloying switches of wcllknown types.

In the drawings'Figures l, il and ff taken together and in the order named represent a complete Circuit ronnectiim between a call ing snhstationvA located in one exchange and a called substation A" lmfatL-din a distant exchangein a system emloodyinp,r the principles of niv intention.

In Fig. 1 thcreis shown diagfrainniatiralljy the automatic sahstition A. Vthe line conn iluctors of- Which terminate in a line switch C, which is controlled hy av master switch D. At E is'shown a first selector switch and at 'F is shown a rej'rcatei. which latter is attached to a trunk line leadingy to a distant exchange.

In Fig.` 2 is showi'x a group ol` relavs l which are associated with the said vtrunk line` These relays may he located either at he calling exchange. the called exchange or any,y intermediate. point. As shown. the said relays are located at a manual hoard at` a point intermediate the callingl and allori exchanges. 'The line switch (l2 is associated with the said group of relays I and is adapt Specifmaton of Letters Patent.

Patented Oct. 31, 1916.

Serial No. 847,574.

ed when oprated to connect theI said trunk line to an o],ierato1"s head set I. The Selector switch M is attached to the opposite end of' the said trunk line and is located in the distant exchange.

In Fig. 3 is shown a connector switch l( and the called suhscril'ieNs individual line switch C and called substation A.

'lhe suhscrihers substation A. is otany suitable or approved type and comprises a receiver if. transmitter 3. ringer L and con denser Being an automatic substation it is also provided with :in impulse transmitter or calling device, which is herein represented hy a pair of im )ulse springs (l and 7 and an impulse wheel 8. which latter is assumed to he controlled through the medium of a linger hole dial (not shown) in such a man ner that the impulse springs 6 and 7 may be momentarily separated a number of times corresponding to. the digit called. When the receiver 2 is withdrawn from the switchhook the bushing 1,7 allows the springs 10 and l1 to break Contact and the springs 9 and 10 to malte contact in a` well known manner.

The coin-controllin;,Y device O associated with the substation A is of the same general type as disclosed in British patent to lV. H. Derriman No. (387 of 1912. The coin-c01- lectinnr device, as herein represented. conesscntiallv of. a polarized electromagnet. the coils 18 and il) of which .are connected in series rwith the si'ihstationA. The springs 20, 21 and 2Q are so arranged that when their contacts are closed, the transmitter il is short-circuited and the receiver 2 shnnted hy a resistance coil vThe lower end of thespring 22 carries a swing,vm

ingh arm Zet to which is'attaehed a small lug l lf the polarized magnet is energized in one direction, the lower end of the arm 26 which is attached to the armature .27 will he tilted to the right and carriedliehincl the lng .lf the magnets then he energized iin the, opposite direction, the arm 26 engages the lug 25 and i'zarricsy the `arm over `with it, thus causing the springs 20, 2l and 22 to hefla'ought into engagement.

The line switch C is 'of the general type or' line switch Shown in British patent to R. W. .lames o. 26,301 1906, the particular forni shown, however,- being similar to that shown in United States Letters Patent No 1,078,690, issued November 18, 1913, to`

States Letters Patent No. 815,321, granted March 13, 1906 to Keith, Erickson and Erickson, being, however, of the particular type shown in British Patent No. 10,376 of 1012, granted to T. G. Martin.

The repeater Ecomprises a line relay 28,

y reverse battery'relay 29, impedance coll 30 .to the switches in the distant exchange.

and the slow acting coils 31 and 32;` The function of the repeater, as is well known, is to maintain a holding circuit for the switches back of it, thus obviating the neces sity of a three-trunk conductor between exchanges and, in addition, it operates to repeat the impulses received by it from the calling substation over the trunk conductoll further object of the repeater is to supply the talking current to the calling subscriber.

The selector M is similar to the selector switch E. l f

The line switch C2 and the master switch N are similar to the line switch C and the master switch D except that the operating magnet of the line switch C2 is furnished with only one winding instead of with two windings, as is the case with the line switch'l (il. Associated with the operators head set P are various relays and keys, the function of which will be goneV into in detail later. The relays I associated with the trunk line --80 are only operated when the connection has been extended through to the distant exchange and the called party has answerefh` The function of these relays will be explained more fully hereinafter.

The connectorswitch K is similar to the connector switch disclosed in United States Letters Patent No. 815,176, granted March 13, 1906, to- Keith., Erickson and Erickson, being, however, of the particular type shown in French Patent No. 466,794 of March 13, 1914. 'i

Throughout the drawings a plurality of batteries B, B', etc., are shown having one l terminal, grounded. In practice there need bc only one batter but preferably one battery for each eXc lange. ringing current generator and at X is shown a busy Si naling machine.` Y

The su iscribers individual switch C and substation A are similar in all respects to4 AtR is shown a-V the subscribers individual sw itclrC and substation A.

Having given a general description of the apparatus, in order to give a complete understanding of my invention I will now describe how the subscriber at substation A 'may establish connection with the Vsubscriber at substation A', whose line terminates in a distant exchange.

We will assume that the number of the called substation A is 2220. In the system shown herein the substation A' is supposed to be located' in a distant .city and the toll charged for a call from one city to the other is twice the toll charged for local c'alls. Means are therefore provided at the checking operators position for supervising the f calls. W hen the calling subscriber removes his receiver preparatory to making a call, the switch-l1ook causes the springs 9' and 10 to make Contact and the springs 10 and 11 to break contact, whereby a bridge consisting of the substation receiver, transmitter and the windings of the coincollecting device is closed across the conductors 39 and 40. The closing of this bridge across the line com pletes an energizing circuit through the line relay 38 of the line switch C, thereby attracting the armature 37. At this time the current through the coin-collecting device 0 is in the direction to attract the armature 2'? toV the coil 1S, thereby carrying the arm 26 behindfthe lug 25. The armature 37 of the line relay7 38, upon being attracted, closes a circuit through the pull-down winding 41 of the magnet 43. The pull-down coil, upon energizing, attracts the plunger arm 44 to force the plunger (not shown) into the bank of contacts 45 to 52 inclusive. It also operates the cutvo' armature 53, whereby the springs 54 and 55 are carried out of engagement with the springs 56 and 57, respectively, thus disconnecting the line relay 38 from the line. The Aarmature 37 does not fall back immediately owing to the fact that the relay 38 is slow acting. The armature 37 being slow to fall back allows sufficient time for a holding circuit Ato be closed in the switch ahead for the cut-off or holding winding 42. The engagement of the springs 45 and 48 with' the springs 49 and 52, respectively, extends the subscribers line to the line relay 58 of the selector E. The line relay 58 of the selector is thereupon energized, closing a circuit through the slow acting relayr 59. The relay 59, upon energizing,\closes the above-mentioned holdingr circuit through the cut-off winding42 of the line switch C. 'The winding 42 upon energizing, holds the armature 53- and the plunger arm 44 in their operated positions after the circuit of the pull-down winding svtitch wipers 86, Si' and 8S opposite the second row or level of bank contacts, from which point the selector operates to seek an idle trunk line leading to the connector switch K (Fi 3) in the saine manner as herelnbefore escribed for-the selector E.

The selector M, upon 'extendingl the con nection through to the connector l, causes the line relay 80 to energize, which in turn, upon energizing, closes a circuit through the slow acting relay 00. The relay 00, upon energizing, supplies a holding ground through its contact springs 01 to the switching relay 92 of the second selector M. A further result ot' the energizing of the relay 00 is the preparing of a circuit for the vertical magnet 102 oy the closing ot' the springs 07 and 08 and the opening oit' the circuit of the release magnet 101 at the springs 98 and 99.

The calling,r subscriber now operates his calling device for the third digit 2, in response to which the line relay 28 ot' the repeater operates to repeat two impulses to the line relay 89 of the connector K. Since the relay 90 is slow actingr it does not deenergize during the momentary interruptions of its circuit by the relay 89 of the connector K, so that each time the latter relay is denergized an impulse is transmitted to the vertical magnet 102 and the relay 103 in series. The vertical magnet receives two impulses over this circuit and operates to raise the switch shaft yvipers 10-1, 105 and 10u to a position opposite the second level ot' bank contacts. The relay 103, which is included in series with the vertical magnet., remains energized during the entire time that impulses are heilig transmitted through it to the vertical magnet, air? in its energized position it closes a circuit through the }.irivate inapgneta` l0?. After the last impulse is delivered thi@ relay 103 opens the circuit of the private magnet 10T, which, upon deiiuergiziig, allows the side switch to pass from first to second position. The movement of the side switch Wiper 108 from first to second position transfers the battery connection from the vertical magnet 102 to the rotary magnet 109. The calling subscriber now operates his calling device for the last digit 0, in response to which the repeater F repeats ten impulses to the line relay S0 of the connector K, Awhich in turn transmits ten impulses to the rotary magnet 10U in series with the series relay 1023, whereby the shaft `wipers are rotated feo onto' the contacts ot-the desired line. The relay 103 operates in response to the Vimpulses tor this digit in the same manner as for the previous digit to advance the sid switch from second to third posit'on. By the engagement of the sidfe switclh wiper 110 with its thirdpositien contact point,

the bridge-cutotl` relay lllvof the line switch (i is energized. liy the engagement ot' the side switch wipers 112 and 113 with their third-position contact points, the connection is completed with the called substation. A guarding potential is supplied to the connector private bank contact 114, which prevents the called line from being seized by some other connector switch. By the en- ,sagement of the side switch wiper 108 with its third-position Contact point, the circuit of the ringing relay 115 is closed, which relay opera-tes to intermittently bridge the generator lt (due to the interrupter U) across the called line to signal the called subscriber'.

Upon the response of the called subscriber his line is provided with talking current through the windings of the back-bridge relay 110. The back-bridge relay, upon energiyling, closes a circuit through the ringer cut-ntf relay 117, which, upon energizing,i`

closes a locking,r circuit for itself independent of the back-bridge relay 116 and opens the circuit of the ringer relay. A further result of the energizing of the hack-bridge relay 116 upon the response of the called' subscriber is the reversing of the connections o the line relay 89 with the trunk line 93-95, whereby the direction of the current in the trunk line is reversed. The reversing of battery upon the trunk line causes the windings of the relay 29 of the repeater F to assist each other, thus causing it to operatively energize and reverse the connections of the line relay 28 with the trunk line whereby the direction of the current in the calling line is reversed. The rerersing of the current in the calling line causes the polarized relay of the coin collector at the substation A to attract its armature in the opposite direction-that is, toward the coil 10. When the armature is attracted in this direction, it carries the arm 24 to the left, forcing the springs20, 21 and 22 into engagement. The engagement of said springs, as hereinheiore mentioned, renders vthe callingF substation inoperative for talking purposes. This, however, is only 'momentary for about the same time or an instant later the group of relays I operate to disconnect the calling line from the called line and connect the called line to the operators head set P.

A further result of the reversing of the current in the calling trunk is to cause the polarized relay 82 to attract its argnature in the opposite direction, which closes the contact of springs 84. The closing of contact springs 84 closes a circuit through the supervisory lamps 119 and 120 and through the line relay 121 of the line switch C2 associated With the trunk line 79-80. The circuit for' the relay 121 extends from ground G2 through vthe springs 84, springs .122 and 123, springs i@ and 129, lme Arelay circuit.

Y121 and tlul .springs 124 of the master suitrh N to hattrry l. Thr relay 121. upon energizing, rlosrs a rirruit through the winding: 125 of the lintl switrh This circuit extends from zround (1 through the :.-lprinfgsy 126 and 127, springs 111 and 12S and the pullalown roil 125 to battery li. The separation of springs 121' and 1li() removes ground@q from the conductor 1511., which multiples through the springs 121' and 13() of every other line switrh (not shown) in the group to lrhirh the line switch (12 l olongs and whi'lrare controlled hy the ums-- ter switch N. "Ihe pirllvdown coil 125. upon\ energizing. attracts the plunger arm 134 to force the plunger (not shown) into the bank of Contacts 135 to 142, inclusive. It also operates to disconnect the line relay 121 by opening the Contact of springs 1251 and 145, forms a new locking.;r closes a circuit through the relay 143. The circuit closed for the relay 143 extends from ,f fround G2 through the Contact of springs' 84, springs 122 and 123, springs 145 and 128 and the relay 143 to battery B. The closure obank springs 137 and 141 causes the master switch N `to operate to move the plungers of the idle line Switches opposite4 an idle operators'head set. The relay 143, upon energizing. closes a locking circuit for itself and for the winding 125 through the springs 1411. The said circuit for the windI ing 125 extends fromground G4 through the springs 147, springs 146 and the said winding 125 to battery B. A further result of the energization of the relay 143 is the disconnecting of the calling line from the called line and the bridging of the operators head setiP across the called line, as hereinbefore mentioned. ,This circuit vextends from ground G through the lower winding of the relay 89, over the Conductor 93, wiper 86, polarized relay `82, springs 149 and 150, springs 151 and 152, bank springs 135 and 139 and the springs 153 of the key K', springs 154 of the calling device S, Windings 156 and 155 of the repeating coil J, springs 157 and 158, bank springs 142 und 138, springs 160 and 159, springs 161 and162, wiper 89. trunk `conductor 95 and the 1g per winding,r of the relay 89 to battery 2. The operator now inquires of the called subm soriber his number and tells him to wait a. moment, Vas she has a toll Call for him.

` The operator next presses the key K2 (holding it closed while she is talking with the calling subscriber), closing a circuit from ground G' through the coil 164, springs of the key K2, bank springs 140 and 131', relay 163 and the rela-y 16,6 to battery B. The relay 1(1(3 being wound with wire made from tlitl'erent material than the wind ings of the relays 1G21 and 1134. it is not oprratii'rljv energia/.ed ovvi the alrarwtrzirwl Thr relay 1h21. upon rui-raising,

oirruit for itself and A 95 extends from the rondurtor' 113 -through Voperator next operates the key disronnects the operatons head set from the called line and ronnrrts it with the calling line. lurther rrsult of theenorgizing of thu rrlay 1112i the .shortairouitingof the roiuhwtors' 925 and Elf extending' to the con urrtor switrh K to lteepthe same from releasing'. 'l'he energizing ol the relay 1114 iiriclgrs the iinpodanre oil 167 across the conductors ot the trunk llhe 751-410. This nii-ruit extends lfrom |ground G through the right-hand winding,r of thrlcoil 167, springs o1 the kry K, springs 1T() and 1131), springs 1154, springs '153, banltV springs 132) and 1.35, springs 152 and 171, trunk conductor 79,` voili,4 29 and $1() of the repeater l, trunk conduotor tt), springs 172 and 160, bank springs 13S and 142, springs 158 and 173, springs of the key K* and the leftdland .winding of the toil 167 to lmttety l5".

`The liridge arrose` theV conductors 93 and the sprin'gslil and 150 of the relay`143,` springs 175 of the` relay 163 and the Silin s 1151 and 162 to the trunk conductor 95. Te current now feld yto thecalling trunk line is in the direction to causo the reverse., battery relay 21) of the repeater to again op eratively energize and reverse the batteryn current upon the` calling line, with the same` results as hereinbefore mentioned.

The calling subscriber. hearing the operator answer, immediati-.ly deposits a coin in.` his coin-collecting device, thuseausiug the arln 24 to lie released from thearln` 26, tliereby allowing the springs 20, 21 and 22 to r turn to nor'nal and the callingr substahatte ry tion. is rendered operative for talking pur- The operator no'wl inquires of the n unberiand the numh'e s oalling. The

K4. thus rausingl; the hattery rurrrnt fo be reversed, haul( to normal on the Calling line, which Causes the polarized relayy at the calling substation to attract, the 'mature 27 toward the coil 18 and theI arm 2li to again catch heliihd the lug 25 on the arm 24. The operator now depresses the key K3`and then releases the keys K2 and K4. The depressing of the key poses. i calling suhsorlber his her of thtx 'subscriber that K3 supplies suilirient. current to the relay 166 for it 'to operatively energize in series with the relay 1113. The relay 16u, upon energizing, opens the circuit of the relay 143 and the windingY 125 of thtl line switohdl" at the springs 147 and at the springs 12:5 and and forms a looking rig-cuit ltlr itselfthrongh the springs 177 and 122. The supervisory lamp 120 is also extinguished at this time hy the separation of the springs 122 and 123. The lim` switrh C2 and the rrlays 113 and 1133 are thus released and returned to norlnal. The railing line is now connected tl'irougih to the nailed line. The ourrent sup plied to thtl railing: line is now in the re' wise dirertion, which causes the polarized relay at the calling substation to again operate, as hereinbeforo described, thus necessitating the dropping of another coinby the calling subscriber' before conversation can be,

ing substation inoperativefir talking. The

operator may next ask the calling subscriber,`

.-gelease magnet '101, upon energizing, re

to deposit another coin and wait until he does so, or shemay depress the key-Ka im mediately and release herself from the trun lino extending between the subscribers. If the calling subscriber had erred in dialing the called subscriber, or for any reason had obtained connection with the wrong subscriber, the operator, upon finding out that a wrong connection has been completed, will tell the calling subscriber to hold the line for a minute and will then' release the key K, thus releasing the relays V163and 164. The operator then instructs the called party to hang up. The operator next dcpresses the key K', opening the bridge across the trunk conductors 93 and 95, which releases the connector switch K and the selector M,

as will be hereinafter explained, the line switch C2 and the coil 143 being held energized from ground G4. The operator now operates her calling Vdevice S to dial the number of the called subscriber. As soon as the called subscriber answers, the polarized relay 82 -will again be energized, thuscaus ing the supervisory lamp 119 to again glow. The operator now handles the call the same as hereinbefore explained. The relay 178 associated with each operators head set remains energized as long as the operator is et her position, but should the operator leave ,her position, the key K5 is thrown and the relay 178 is allowed to denergize and place a guarding potential upo the master switch bank contact andthe re ay 179 is caused to energize and cloeeits contactslSO. The relays 179, which are individual to the' operetors position the same as the relays 178, are energized only when an'operatorspposii tion has been seized by ,a line switch J2, when the busying relay 178 is denergized. The contacts 180 controlled by therelagys 179 form a vchain of contacts to operate a suf pervisory signal. The supervisory signal may' be placed 'at the chief operators'posit` tion to notify her that 'all the operators positions are busy. I

Returning to the completed connection, as soon as the conversation has been completed, the calling subscriber, receiver, causes the hook Vswitch springs 9 and 10 to separate and open the circuit of the line relay 28 of the repeater I, which,l

Ori

upon replacing hisl I energizing,

.The relay 75,

upon denergizing, openscthe bridge across the conductors 79 and 80 at the springs 34 and opens the circuit of the relay 32at the ,springs 182 and 183.

leases the connector switch tol normal and its own circuit is opened at the s Vrings 186 when the switch shaft reaches its owest pw sition. The removing of ground from the conductor 94 allows the relay 92 of the selector M to tienergize, which, upon deenergizing, closes a circuit through the release magnet 187, which latter magnet, upon releases` the selector M to normal. Referring to the repeater F, as soon as the relay 32 denergizes, holding ground is xei moved from the conductor 188, which allows the relay 75 of the selector E and the winding 42 of the line switchl C to` denergize. upon dencrgizing, releases the selector E in the same manner as explained for the selector M. ,The kWinding 42, upon denergizing, permitsthe plunger arm 44- and the relay armature 53 to return to normal.

If the called line is busy, there will be a guarding potential upon the 'connector private bank contact, just as explained lin connection with the line switch C. The connector private wiper 114, upon engaging this guarding contact, and before the side switch Wipers have passed to third position, completes an energizing circuit for the busy locking relay 191v and the private magnet 107 inseries. Tlie private magnet remains energized Yand locks the side switch in. second position, while the busy relay, upon energizing, transmitsa. bus signal to the calling subscriber-in n, well-known manner. The calling subscribftgy upon replacing his receiver, releasesfthe connection in a .hereinm before mentioned manner.

If a1 subscriberwhose substation is not equipped. with a pay-station (tlm substation A', or example) wlshesto call a :subscriber distant exchange, the method of prev cedureand '.the" operation of the automatic switches andiapparatus will be the same as hereinbeore explained, with the exception that the o rater, instead of having to WaitV fof thezca ling subscriber to deposit a coin before she can converse with him, will simply make out a ticket charging the call to the calling subscriber. 0f course, the operator willnot have to operate the battery reverse key K4 to collect the second toll.

tion, they may suggest themselves. For example, the toll.

may be such that the recording'operator .will operate the battery reverse key K" several tunes'to collect several coins, or, in the seond onse considered, where the calling substation is not equipped with :i puy-stu- :isk to have the charges; ren versed, in which ense the operator will ronfer with the colled party and find out if he is willing to puy' forthe niessngmor for pnrt of it, :ind will nnike out the charge. tielcet accordingly.

l WVhil'e I have illllotruted und described one particular enibodiment of my invention with a system employing automatic switches `of Well-known types, Vit will. of course. be

understood that furious rhiinges and modifications con be mede without depui-ting from the spirit und intent of my invention. yllr'hnt I claim es my invention isz-- 1. V[n n telephonz system, menne by which one subscriber muy set up n connection with smother,v und :nouns whereby nn opoiotor is brought in on such cozinertion utter the Srimr has been established.

2. In a-telephone system, means by whii-h onel subscriber muy set up n connection with another, and menne whereby nn operator is brought in on Such ronneition b v the re sponse of the culled subscriber.

3. ln n teleph'one system, menus by which one subscriber' muy net up n connection with another. and moans whereby un operator is brongb in on such sonner-tion after the saune has been established, Suid operntor being provided with means for breaking the connection between the two subscribers and talking to either subscriber to the exclusion of the other.

L In n telephone synteni, means by which one Suhseribin muy set up n connection with nnother, :ind inenns whereby :in operator brought in on snob i-onmution by the r1- Sponse oiE the culled subepribir, said opvriitor bein?? Dl'vided with 'means for brividin ing the connection between the two subscribers and bulking to either subscriber to the exclusion of th other.

5. In e. ielephone system, means by which one subscriber may eet up n connection with another, und means whereby nn operator is bron ht in on such connection after the seme han )een established, said.opcrator being' rovided with menos for rendering the'oall ing telephone ino iterative and Ineens under the control ed t e calling subscriber for then renden said telephone operative.

6. In n tele one system, means by which -one subscriber may set up a connection with another, and means whereby an operator is brought in on auch connection b the re.- sponse of the calied subscriber, sai operator 4being provided with means for rendering the .walling telephone inoperative and means under the control o' the culling subscriber for then rendering Suid telephone perativo.

i". In n telephone system, ineens by which one subscriber may set up n oonneotion with zun'ither, und means whereby un operntor is brought in` on such connection after the same has been established. means whereby sind operator muy elinnrmte bergnflt' nuto- `lnntufnlly from the circuit. the two subscribers being provided with menne,r for there utter completing their connection :ind outoniiitirnlly releasing the same.

S. In :i telephone system, ,menney by lin-h one subscriber `may setup u ronnertion with another, und ineens whereby iinoprutor is brought in on such nonnen-tion by the rek oponer of the culled subscriber. ill operotor bring enabled to eliminate bores-it' :lutoluzitioully from the circuit, leruingr the two subscribers to complete their runnen-tion und nutomutirnlly release tba-:sanne U. .in nn :lutonmtic telephone system. menne including' u trunk line und u plurality of :xutonmtic sitrhes for ronncriing :i colt ing und u culled line` :i eeoond trunk line cxtcnrlingto an operntor`s position` und menne uctuntcd upon the response of the culled subscriber for dividing: said' first trunk lino und for connerting the culled end thereof with Suid second trunk line.

lli. in :rn nutonnitie telephone System, mmm including :i trunk line nml u plurality oi automatic snvitibes for runner-ting ai Cnlling und n milled line, n sei-ond trunk line er\'teinlil1gr to nn inierntor'i,` position. inenns actuated upon the responsiof the willed subscriber for dividing said first trunk line nnd for oonnecting the culled end thereof with smid srrond trunk line. sind means controlled by the operator for .substituting the culling end for the milled end thereafter.

li. ln :in nutonuiti.' telplrone system, morini. mriiiiliig u tn nkfline und o pluriility of uutonnitr switlrlies for oonnectiny u willing und u culled line, u seumd trim line extending -to im' operntors position, menne actuated upon the response of the milled subseriber for dividing?` Said first trunk line :ind for connecting the called end thereof with Suid Fei-ond trunk line, menne oontrolled by the operator for Substinting the Pulling end for the culled end thereafter. und additional menne Controlled by the operator whereby the.. calling und coiled ends of said first trunk line may be recon n'eeted.

12. In nn automatic telephone system, meent; including;r u trunk line and n plurality of automatic switches for connecting a calling and a called line, a second trunk line extending to im operators position, means actuated upon the response of the called euh- III scriber for dividing said BM m HB8 and I for connecting the called end thereof with said second trunk line, means controlled by the operator for substituting the calling end for the called end thereafter, additional means controlled by the operator whereby the calling and called ends of said first trunk line may be reconnected and the said second trunk line disconnected therefrom.

13; In a telephone system, means for establishing automatic connections between a calling and a called line, said means including a trunk line comprising two normally connected sections, a second trunk line extending to an operators position, and means actuated upon the response of the called subscriber for separating said sections and for connecting one of them with said Second trunk line.

14. In a telephone system, means for establishing automatic connection between a` calling and a called line, said means includingr a trunk line comprising two normally connected sections, a second trunk line eX- tending to an operators position, means actuated upon the response of called subscriber for separating said sections and for connecting one of them with fsaid second trunk line, and means controlled by the operator thereafter for substitntingthe other section for the one so connected.

15. In a telephone system, means for establishing automatic connection between a calling and a called line, said means .including a trunk line comprising two normally connected sections,V a second trunk line extending to an operators position, means actuated upon the response of the called subscriber for separating said sections and for connecting one of. them with7 Said second trunk, means controlled by the operator thereafter for substituting the other section for the one so connected, and additional means controlled by the operator whereby said sections may be again connected.

16. In a telephone system` means for establishing automatic connection between a, calling and a called line, said means including a trunk line comprising two normally connected sections, a second trunk line extending to an operators position, means actuated upon the response of the called subscriber for separating said sections and for connecting one of them with4 said second trunk, means controlled by the operator thereafter for substituting the other section for the one so connected, and additional means controlled by the operator whereby said sections may be again connected and said second trunk line disconnected therefrom.

17. In a telephone system, automatic switching mechanism controlled over a calling line to establish connection with a called line, means for breaking said connection thereafter at some point without releasing after substituting the other line for the line n so connected.

19. In a telephone system, automatic switching mechanism controlled over a calling line to establish connection with a called line, means for breaking said connection thereafter at some ypoint without releasing said mechanism, means 'for then connecting one of said lines with a trunk extending to an operato rs position, means for thereafter substituting the other line for the line so soi connected, and means whereby the said calll ing and called lines may be again connected together.

20. In a telephone system, automatic switchingmechanism controlled over a calling line to establish connection with a called line, means for breaking said` connection thereafter at some point without releasing said mechanism, means for then connecting one of said lines with atrunk extending to an operators position, means for thereafter substituting the other line for the line so connected, and meanswhereby the said calling and called lines may be again connected together and the said trunk line removed from the .onnection 21. In a telephone system, automatic switching mechanism controlled over a calling line to establish connection with a called line, means for breaking said connection thereafter at some point without releasing said mechanism, and means operable thereafter for placing said lines separately into communication with an operator. l

22. In a telephone system, automatic switching mechanism controlled over a calling line to establish connection with a called line, means for breaking said connection thereafter at some point without releasing said mechanism, means operable thereafter for placing said lines separately into communication with an operator, and means whereby said lines may be again connected together to the exclusion of said operator1 23. In a telephone system, means by which one subscriber may set up a connection with anothbr, and means whereby an operator is brought in on such connection after the same has been established, said operator being provided with means for rendering the calling telephone inoperative, and mechanical means under the control of the calling subscriber for then rerwf-` i l elcplzcne operative.

:541. In a telephone system, ineens by which one subscriber may set up e connection with another, and means whereby an operator is brought in on such connection b the respouse of the called subscriber, sui( operator being provided with means for rendering the culling telephone inoperative,'and mechanicul Ineens under the control of the culling subscriber for then rendering said telephone operative.

25. In u telephone system, means by which one subscriber may set un n connection with another, and means whereby an operato;- is brought in on such Connection after the sanne has been established. said operator being provided with menne for rendering the calling teleiihone inoperative. and gravity operate-d means onder the control of the calling sub scriber for then rendering said telephone operative.

Q6. In a telephone system,.means by which one eubscriber muv set up a connection with another, und means whereby an operator is `brought in on such connection by the response of the called s1xbscxibe1,sad operator being Vprovided with means for rendering the calling'teiephone inoperative, and gravity operated means under the control of the calling subscriber for then rendering Suid telephone operative.

Signed hv me at Chicago, look county, illinois this 20th da of June, 1914.

i BE NARD D. W'ILLIS.

Witnesses GEORGE YANoCHowsKI, HERBERT W. KRACKE.

Classifications
U.S. Classification379/260
Cooperative ClassificationH04Q3/00