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Publication numberUS1204478 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 14, 1916
Filing dateDec 16, 1914
Priority dateDec 16, 1914
Publication numberUS 1204478 A, US 1204478A, US-A-1204478, US1204478 A, US1204478A
InventorsEdward W Noakes, Edward W Noakes Jr
Original AssigneeEdward W Noakes, Edward W Noakes Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floor-scrubbing machine.
US 1204478 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. W. NOAKES & E. W. NOAKES, JR.

FLOOR SCRUBBING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED DEC. 16. 1914.

1,204,478. Patented Nov. 14, 1916.

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FLOOR SCRUBBING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED DEC. 16. 1914.

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.EDWARD W. NOAKES AND EDWARD W. NOAKES, JRQOF RIVERSIDE, ILLINOIS.

FLOOR-SORUIBBING MAGHIN E.

Specification of Letters l atent.

Patented Nov. 14, 1916.

Application filed December 16. 1914. Serial No. 877,491.

To all whom it may concern.

Be it known that we, EDWARD W. NoAKEs, a subject of the King of Great Britain, and EDWARD W. NOAKES, J r., a citizen of the United States, residing at Riverside, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Floor-Scrubbing Machines, of which the following is a specification.

Our object is to provide a novel, simple and economical construction of machine for washing floors, which shall operate effectively to cleanse the floor and remove the dirty water therefrom, leaving the floor in comparatively dry condition.

Referring to the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a plan view of a machine constructed in accordance with our invention. Fig. 2 is a plan view of the devices carried by the platform of the machine, for cooperating with the floor to be washed, this view being taken in a plane coincident with the under side of the platform of the machine and showing in section certain of the parts which extend above the latter. Fig. 3 is a view in side elevation of the machine; and Fig. 4, an enlarged sectional view through the air-delivery; pipe located in the rear of the suction nozzles of the machine.

The platform of the machine with which the operative parts hereinafter described, are connected, is represented at 5, and is supported on wheels 6, shown as arranged at the four corners of the platform. The wheels 6 are, in the construction illustrated, journaled in brackets 7 depending from disks 8 pivot-ally connected with plates 9 secured to the under side of the platform, whereby the machine may be readily moved over the floor to be washed, as by pushing it.

Supported at the front end of the platform 5 is a tank 10 which may be either open at the top, ,as shown, or closed, as desired. This tank is provided for receiving the wash-water which may be plain water or a. solution of water and soap, and is connected through the medium of pipes 11, having valves 12, with a horizontally disposed pipe 13 supported by brackets 14 to extend preferably in front of the base 5 and at a slight distance from the floor the u per surface of which is represented at X, the pipe 13 containing apertures, not shown, along its under side for permitting water from the tank 10 to be discharged upon the floor.

In the rear of the pipe 13 brushing means are provided for scrubbing the portion of the floor to which the water is supplied from the tank 10, these means, in the construction illustrated, comprising a rotary brush 15 of the bristle type journaled at stub-shafts 16 at its opposite ends, in depending brackets 17 secured to the under slde of the platform 5 at the opposite sides of the latter, a pulley 18 being rigidly SB',

cured to the brush for driving the latter in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 3, as here inafter described. Extending transversely of the platform 5 and secured to the under side of the latter, is a depending plate 19 which serves to intercept the water thrown off from the brush 15 and direct it on to the floor in front of the brush; and secured to the under side of the platform 5, at opposite sides of the latter, are hoods 20 which also serve to confine the water thrown off the brush 15 and deflect it generally toward the median line of the machine.

Located, preferably slightly in the rear of the hoods 20, are blast-nozzles 21 preferably of the form shown, namely, of general triangular form, the discharge outlets of the latter being located along the edge thereof, represented at 22, with the nozzles so arranged, as illustrated, as to direct air supplied thereto, as hereinafter described,

against the fioor from opposite sides of the machine in a direction toward the median line of the machine, whereby the water passing under the hoods 20 is caused to be blown toward the media-l line of the machine to prevent it from spreading out to such an extent that it will extend beyond the zone in which the suction nozzles, hereinafter referred to, operate. In the construction illustrated, the blast-nozzles 21 are secured to the platform through the medium of depending plates 23 attached to the under side of the platform, and blast-pipes 24:, which open into the inlet ends of the nozzles 21,

communicate with the source of air-supply struction illustrated, comprising a plurality of suction nozzles 25, each preferably of a length less than the width of the machine and arranged in rows transversely of the machine in break-joint relation. In the ar--' rangement illustrated three rows of these nozzles are provided, there being one of the nozzles provided in the first row and ar-- ranged midway between the sides of the machine, two in the next row and three in the next row, with the suction nozzles arranged in break-joint or relative overlapping relation, shown. Each of these nozzles is therefore independent of the others, and it is desired that they be caused to move in contact with the floor and be free tovyield independently of each other uponencountering unevennesses in the floor. Thus, should a nozzle ride over a raised portion of the floor, the other nozzles will be free to remain in contact with the floor, thus preventing a break in the suction. Any suitable form of nozzle may be employed, those illustrated comprising hollow members supported in rearwardly and downwardly inclined position, as represented, with their lower suction edges, represented at 26, each containing a single slot which extends throughout the length of the nozzle, or with a series of apertures, as desired, the nozzles extending at their open sides against the floor; and flexiblepipes 27 connected with the nozzles and opening into the interiors thereof and connected with mechanism hereinafter described for producing the desired suction at the months 26 of the nozzles. The pipes 27 open into passages 28in a plate secured to the under side of the platform 5, which communicate with the mechanism for producing suction in the nozzles 25. It is preferred that the nozzles 25 coiiperate with means for yieldingly pressing them downwardly to insure contact with the floor. Suitable means for this purpose may be in the form of springs, as for example, those shownat 29, these springs being of bowshape with their upper ends secured to the under side of the platform 5, as indicated at 30, and their lower free ends secured to the nozzles 25, the parts described being so arranged that the springs 29 will beunder tension when'the nozzles 25 are in contact withthe floor.

lVe provide means for directing a blast of air against the floor in the rear of the rearmost nozzles 25, in a direction toward the front of the machine, for acting on water which, for any cause, may remain on the floor after subjection to the suction mechanism, for blowing the water into a position for being acted upon by the rearmost nozzles 25, these means, in the construction illustrated, comprising a pipe 31 supported at its ends in depending brackets 32 secured to the under side of the platform 5 at its opposite sides. The pipe 31 is provided with an aperture, or apertures, for discharging air supplied to the pipe 31 through the pipes 33 connected with a source of compressed air-supply, hereinafter referred to, against the floor in a direction toward the front of the machine. The pipe 31, as shown, has a single aperture 3- which extends continuously throughout the length of the pipe between caps 35 on the ends of the pipe, this aperture being formed by bending a sheet of metal into substantially circular form in cross-section, with its edges slightly spaced apart and its rear edge depending slightly below its other edge, as represented at 34 (Fig. 4), and slightly forwardly deflected, whereby air introduced into the pipe 31 will be discharged against the floor X in a forward direction for driving the water toward the rear nozzles 25.

In the rear of the blast-pipe 31 means for intercepting Water which, for any cause, may remain on the floor after subjection to the devices hereinbefore described, are provided. These means are in the form of a squeegee, represented at 36. It is designed that this squeegee operate to deflect the water, should any remain on the floor, in a direction to be operated on by the machine in its return movement over the floor, it being designed that the machine by preference be moved back and forth on the floor, first in one direction and then in the other, the machine being turned end-fo-r-end preparatory to moving it each time across the floor. To this end we pivot the squeegee mechanism 36, whereby its position horizontally may be varied, to vary the angle at which it extends relative to the median line of the machine, whereby the surplus water, if any,

may be caused to be deflected by the squeegee toward the unwashed portion of the floor, regardless of the direction in which the machine is moving. The squeegee mechanism illustrated comprises a bar 37 which extends transversely of the machine, this bar being slotted along its lower edge, as represented at 38, and confining a squeegee strip 39 of rubber, or other suitable material. The bar 37 is provided centrally with an upwardly extending lug 40 carrying a pivot-pin 41 which extends upwardly into a socket member 42 secured to the under side of the platform 5, a nut 43 screwing upon the upper end of the pin 41 and opposing a shgulder 44 in the socket formed by making the latter of enlarged diameter at its upper end. The" construction just described affords a pivotal connection between the bar 37 and the platform, whereby the bar may be swung in a horizontal plane in either direction, the parts described being so constructed that the bar 37 may move vertically relative to the socket member 42 to permit the squeegee to accommodate itself to unevennesses in the floor. It is preferred that some means be provided for yieldingly pressing the squeegee against the floor to insure its contact therewith, the means shown comprising springs 45 secured to the under side of the platform 5 and bearing at their free ends, under spring tension,

against the top of the bar 37 at opposite sides of the pivot 11. In the construction shown, the upper surface of the bar 37 in- (-lines downwardly in opposite directions from the pivot 11. and to prevent the springs from becoming dislocated, pins 46 are provided on the bar 37 and serve as stops for the springs. As desirable means for shifting the position of the squeegee in a horizontal plane, we provide a lever 47 pivotally connected, as indicated at 48, to' one of the depending brackets 32, this lever being pivotally connected, as indicated at 49, at its lower end to alink 50 pivotally connected at 51 with one end of the bar 37. The lever 47 coiiperates with a notched segment 52 for holding the lever 47 in its position of adjustment when swung at its pivot 48 in either direction, it being understood that the swinging of this lever will vary the angular position of the squeegee 36 in a horizontal plane, for the purpose above stated.

Any suitable mechanism for producing the amount of suction at the nozzle openings 26 sufficient to lift the water from the floor, may be provided. It is preferred, however, that a blast-producing device be employed, as for example, what is commonly known in the art as a. blower, which is represented at 53, and may be driven, through the medium of a belt 54, by an electric motor 55 supported on the platform 5. The inlet end of the blower communicates with the passages 28, and the outlet end thereof opens into a pipe 56 leading into the upper end of a closed tank 57 supported on the platform and into the upper end of which the pipes 24 and 33 open, these pipes being provided with cocks 58 and 59. The electric motor is also belted to the brush 15 through the medium of a. belt 60 extending over the pulley 18 and over a pulley 61 secured to the armature shaft 62 of the motor.

The operation of the machine is as follows: As the machine is pushed across the floor wash-water from the tank 10 is discharged upon the floor from the pipe 13. The brush 15, in rotating against the floor to which the water has been applied, cleanses the floor, the plate 19 and hoods 20 serving to intercept the water, as hereinbefore explained. The operation of the blower 53 causes suction to be produced at the nozzles 25 which, in moving in contact with the floor at their inlets 26, lifts the wash-water from the latter, discharging it, together with air which also enters the inlets of the nozzles 25, into the tank 57. Air from the tank 57 discharges through the blast-nozzles 21 and serves to confine the wash-water to a restricted path. whereby the spreading of the water laterally beyond the suction nozzles 25, is prevented. Air from the tank 57 also enters the pipe 31 and discharges through its aperture 3% against the floor, generally in a forward direction, which causes any water which may remain on the floor after subjection to the nozzles 25, to be forced into a position in which the nozzles may act upon it. The squeegee 36, as'will be readily understood, serves to act upon any surplus water which may remain on the floor after the devices in front of the latter have passed over the floor. The pivoting of the squeegee, as hereinbefore stated, permits of it being adjusted in a horizontal plane to throw the surplus Water upon the unwashed portion of the floor, regardless of the direction in which the machine is moving across the floor.

It is desirable that provision be made for raising the nozzles 25 out of contact with the floor; in the construction shown, this being effected by means of cables 63 extending over pulleys 6-1 supported from the platform 5, and connected at their opposite ends with the nozzles 25, as indicated at 65, and with a drum 66, as indicated at 67, this drum being journaled in depending brackets 68 se cured to the platform 5 and provided with a hand-lever (39 coiiperating with a notched segment 70, by which the drum 66 may be rotated for winding the cables 63 upon it, thereby elevating the nozzles 25 against the resistance of the springs 29.

The tank 57 is preferably provided with a valved outlet 57 through which the tank may be emptied of the water discharged into it by the blower 58, it being preferred that during the discharge of the water from the tank 57 the valves 58 and 59 be closed and the blower 53 operated to force air into the tank 57 and thereby discharge the water under pressure.

While we have illustrated and described a particular embodiment of our invention, we do not wish to be understood as intending to limit it thereto, as various changes and alterations may be made therein without departing from the spirit of our invention.

What we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is 1. In a floor-washing machine, the combination of suction means including a head through which the water on the floor is sucked, a source of compressed air supply, and means for directing air from said sup ply against the floor in the rear of said head in a direction for forcing water remaining on the floor in the rear of said head, into position to be acted on by said head.

2. In a floor-washing machine, the combination of a suction head for lifting the water from the floor, a tank-,a suction-producing device connected withsaid head and discharging into said tank, and means for directing the air discharged into said tank by said device, against the floor in the rear of said head in a direction for forcing water remaining on the floor in the rear of said head, into position to be acted on by said head.

3. In a floor-washing machine, the combination'of brushing means, suction means for lifting the water from the floor, a source of compressed air supply, and means for directing air from said supply against the floor in the rear of said brushing means and in advance of said suction means and toward the median line of the machine, for limiting the spread of the water laterally on the floor.

4. In a floor-washing machine, the combination of brushing means, suction means for lifting the Water from the floor, a source of compressed air supply, and means for directing air from said supply against the floor in the rear of said brushing means and in advance of said suction means, from the opposite sides of the machine and toward the median line thereof, for limiting the spreading of water laterally on the floor.

5,. In a floor-washing machine, the combination of means for applying water to the floor, brushing means, suction means for lifting the water from the floor, a source of compressed air supply, and means for directing air from said supply against the floor in the rear of said brushing means and in advance of said suction means and toward the median line of the machine for limiting the spreading of the water laterally on the floor.

6. In a floor-washing machine, the combination of means for discharging water upon the floor, brushing means, a source of compressed air supply, and a blast-nozzle con-' nected therewith and located at a side of the machine in position to direct air from said supply against the floor in the rear of said brushing means and toward the median line of the machine,

7. In a floor-washing machine, the combination of means for discharging water upon the floor, a rotary brush device adapted to rotate in contact with the floor, means for driving said brush, hoods arranged at opposite sides of the machine and converging toward the rear end of the machine, a source of compressed air supply, and blast-nozzles connected with said supply and supported adjacent to said hoods in position to direct air from said supply against the floor from opposite sides of the machine toward the median line thereof, to prevent lateral spreading of the water.

8. In a floor-washing machine, the combination of means for applying water to the floor, brushing means, suction means for lifting the water from the floor, a source of compressed air supply, and blast nozzles connected with said air supply and supported at opposite sides of the machine in the rear of said brushing means and in front of said suction means, said blast nozzles being arranged to extend at an angle to the median line of the machine and converging toward the rear end of the machine.

EDWARD W. NOAKES. EDWARD W. NOAKES, JR. In presence of JOSEPH SCHWARTZ, N. B. DEARBORN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3197798 *Jan 28, 1963Aug 3, 1965Tennant Co G HScrubbing machine
US3273193 *Mar 22, 1965Sep 20, 1966Concept Dev CorpCleaning apparatus
US4800612 *Nov 23, 1987Jan 31, 1989Cross American CorporationVacuum power booster with automatic waste liquid discharge for a water vacuum extraction apparatus
US6247202Jun 4, 1999Jun 19, 2001The Hoover CompanyCarpet extractor fluid supply system
US6421862Apr 25, 2001Jul 23, 2002The Hoover CompanyCarpet extractor fluid supply system
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/320, 15/50.3
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/34