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Publication numberUS1212521 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 16, 1917
Filing dateMar 16, 1916
Priority dateMar 16, 1916
Publication numberUS 1212521 A, US 1212521A, US-A-1212521, US1212521 A, US1212521A
InventorsAlbert Lonson
Original AssigneeAlbert Lonson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin-box.
US 1212521 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. LONSON.

COIN BOX.-

APPLICATION FILED MAR. 16.1916.

Patented Jan. 16, 1917.

2 SHEETS-SHEET l.

d d 1i Mmmm A'ITO R N EY A. LONSON.

COIN BOX.

APPLICATION FILED MAR. 16,1916.

'l ,21 2,521. Patented Jan. 16,1917.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

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'-Fig Miliz@ ATTO E N EY ALBERT LONSON, 0F GALLAVAY, MINNESOTA.

COIN-BOX.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Jan. 16, 1917.

Continuation in part of application Serial No. 33,779, filed June 12, 1915. This application filed March 16,

To @ZZ whom t may concern v Be it known that l, ALBERT LoNsoN, a citizen of the United States, residing at Callaway, in the county of Becker and State of Minnesota, have invented a new and useful Coin-Box, of which the following is a specification. l

This invention has reference to coin boxes, and its object is to provide a coin box for use in banks, or in business houses, or other places where it is desired to have the coins in convenient arrangement for handling or storage, or both, with the coin box when full of coins of a certain denomination representing a certain definite sum of money.

In accordance with the present invention there is provided a box or receptacle which may be of tray-like form and is customarilyv made of cardboard, although other suitable materials will answer. Within the box there is lodged a nest in the form of one or more blocks, usually of wood, with transversely arranged grooves which may be concave in cross-section in conformity with the shape of the coins, while the sides of the box have notches or recesses in them through which the coins may be readily grasped. Extending lengthwise midway of the width of the grooved block or blocks is a bar, usually made of wood, and constituting a partition extending to a less height thanv the top edges of the walls separating the transverse grooves. The bar is straight or plane along one edge or along both edges, or one edge may be provided with transverse notchesy matching the lgrooves in the nest made up of the grooved block or blocks, whereby with the notched side of the bar uppermost the transverse grooves in the nest are continuous from one side of the box to the other. With the plain side of the bar uppermost there is formed a longitudinal partition separating each groove into two parts with the plane face of the bar stopping short of the top of the division walls of the grooves tothereby provide a convenientiinger space, so that the user may with the thumb and one finger grasp the coins between the partition and the edge of the box to lift them therefrom. The recessed division bar is sometimes reo versible so that the box may be adapted to longer or shorter bundles or stacks of coins, since the coins may be placed in the box either Wrapped or loose. Whenv a straight Serial No. 84,636.

bar free from notches is employed reversibility is of no moment and no provision is made therefor, but the advantage of a cen tral partition dividing the interior of the box into two longitudinal series of pockets forthe coin is retained. It is, furthermore, advantageous from an economical standpoint, and especially in longer types of boxes, to make the nest of more than one piece, and in such case the bar forming the intermediate partition serves as a stiifening member for the blocks making up the nest. Whether or not the reversible bar or partition be used, the blocks are longitudinally grooved in the'faceremote from that containing the transverse grooves, sor as to receive the bar. It is not necessary to fasten the bar even when not reversible, since the ends of the box then prevent longitudinal movement of the bar. In the case of the bar being reversible the ends of the box are each provided with an opening in line with the bar, so that the latter may be removed from the box and reversed at will. Y

It is customary to provide a suitable cover so that when the box is not in use with the coins exposed, it may be closed to prevent escape ofthe coins or for the storage 0f the coins.

f The invention will be best understood from a consideration of the following detailed description` taken in connection with the accompanying drawings forming part of this specification, with the further understanding that while the drawings show a practical form of the invention, the latter is not confined to any strict conformity withthe showing of the drawings, but may be changed and modified so long as such changes and modifications come within the scope of the appended claims.

In the drawings Figu're 1 is a plan view of ai coin box embodying the present inven* tion, and particularly that type having the reversible division bar, with the notched side of the bar uppermost. Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1 with theplane side of the bar uppermost. Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the body portion of the box with the cover in longitudinal section. Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4 4 of Fig. l with the cover in place. Fig. 5 is a section on the line 5-5 of Fig. 2, with the cover omitted. Fig. 6 is a. section on the line 6-6 of Fig. l with the cover in place. Fig. 7 is a section on the line 7-7 of Fig. 2. Fig. 8 is an end view of the box of' F ig. 1 and associated figures. Fig. 9 is a plan view or' a coin box of the present invention having a non-reversible bar and. showing a plurality of transversely grooved blocks constituting the coin nest. Fig. 10 is a section on the line 10%-10 of Fig. 9. Fig. 11 is a section on the line 11-11 of Fig. l0. Fig. 12 is a perspective view of the reversible bar or Vpartition of the structure shown in Fig. 1.

No specific claim is made in this application to the construction shown in Figs. 9, 10 and 11, as this has been made the subject-matter of a separate. application iled September l1, 1916, Serial No. 119,524.V

Referring to the drawings, and first to the structure of F ig.'1 andassociated figures, there Vis shown a tray-like body member or box 1 usually of rectangular outline and.Y vcustomarily made of pasteboard, although other materials will answer for the purpose. lThe box is usually as deep or somewhat deeper than therdiameter of the coins for which it is intended, and within the box there is lodged a nest 2 comprising in the particularl showing of the drawings a block formed on what constitutes-its upper face when in use, with a longitudinal series of transverse grooves 3, each groove being separated from the neighboring groove by a narrow ridge or wall e. The'nest 2, which is customarily, though not necessarily, made of wood in the form of a'block, has 1n itsV under face a longitudinal groove 6 intersecting the grooves 3, but stopping short of the upper surface of the nest or block 2, so that the portions oliV the block on opposite sides of the groove 6 are joined by the ridges or walls 1. Y

in the construction shown in Fig. 1 and associated figures the end walls i' the box or receptacle 1 have passages 7 therethrough matching the groove 6. Y

Adapted to slide lengthwise of the groove 6 is a bar or partition 8 shown separately in Fig. 12. This bar has one long edge 9 plane and the other-long` edge formed with a series of recesses 10 conforming in curvature to the grooves 3. The bar 8, which is customarily, though not necessarily, made of wood, is ordinarily of rectangular cross-section and made to lit quite snugly into the groove 6, entering the groove through one of the openings or passages 7. Since the bar 8 is designed to slide lengthwise into and out of the groove 6, so that either the recesses 10 or the plane edge 9 may be uppermost, the groove may be termed a slideway and the Vbar a slide. W hen the recesses 10 are uppermost the continuity of the grooves 3 from end to end is not interrupted, but when the plane edge 9 of the bar or partition 8 is uppermost the bar constitutes a division wall for the series of grooves, which bar in the particular construction shown traverses the grooves midway of their length and extends lengthwise of the nest 2. Under these circumstances each groove 3 is divided into two pockets extending from the bar or partition 8 to the corresponding side wall or the box 1.

Each side wall of thebox 1 is formed with a seriesoiE notches l1 preferably, thoughV not necessarily, of approximately semi-circular formY withv each notch Ymatching a Vcorresponding groove 3. finger room for grasping a stack Vof coins lodged in a groove 3, whether these coins Vbe wrapped or be loose. TWhen the notched edge of the'bar 8 is uppermost and the grooves 3 are continuous froml side to side of the box 1, the stack of loose or wrapped coins may extend from side to side ofthe box. lWhen the plane edge 9 of the bar 8 isuppermost, then the stacks of'coins extend from the bar to the correspondingside or' the boX, wherefore each groove 3 will then contain Atwo stacks of' coins each of equal amount.

A box such as shown in Fig. 1 may, for example, have the curvature of the'grooves 3 conforming to the curvature of a'silver half Vdollar and with the five grooves shown thebox will readily hold one hundred dol- -larsxin halic dollars, with each bundle or staclcof coins between the bar orv partition 8 and the side of the box containing ten dollars. Y

The box may be mad-e to hold a definite amount of coins when the plane edge 9 of the bar 8 is uppermost, in'which Vcase the bar 8 constitutes4 a central longitudinal partition. When the coins are'wrapped they occupy more space lengthwise than when loose or unwrapped7 Yand'in such case the partition maybe reversed Vso as not to interfere with the somewhat longer bundles of coin, and, furthermore, the particular function of the bar 8 is not then needed, since the coins cannot become loose.

The notches provide los For protection the box lis provided with i a cover l2, which, when the box 1 is made of pasteboard, may also be made of pasteboard. The cover may be of any ordinary construction and' needs no special description. Such cover may contain printed matter descriptive of the contents of the box, but as such arrangement is common no attempt is made to show it. Y Y

Oft-entimes the only use to which it is desired to put the box is for holding coins which are not wrapped, that is, for holding coins which may be termed loose coins, with the box so arranged as to, when full, contain a denite quantity or value of coins. In such case the reversibility of the division or partition bar is not necessary.V However, for manufacturing reasons the same general construction as is indicated in Fig. 1 is followed. Such a box is shown in Figs. 9, 1() and 11 as comprising a tray-like box or body member 1 of generally rectangular outline with a nest 2 composed of blocks 2a, 2b each having transverse grooves 3 therein separated by ridges 4, and each block 2a and 2P has a longitudinal central groove 6 for the reception of a bar 8aL which may be as long as the combined length of the two blocks. The grooves G intersect the grooves 3 as in the construction shown in Fig. 1 and the bar 8iL enters the grooves 3 about midway of their width and constitutes a division member or partition extending lengthwise of the box 1 and traversely of the grooves 3 in the same manner as does the bar 8 in the construction of Fig. 1 and associated figures when the plane edge 9 is uppermost.

In the construction shown in Fig. 9 and associated figures the end walls of the box 1 are not provided with passages, because there is no need of removing the bar 8a and the end Walls serve to hold the bar 8a against displacement. The bar 8a performs the same function in the structure'of Fig. 9 and associated figures as it does in the arrangement shown in Figs. 2, 5 and 7. The side walls of the box 1 of Fig. 9 have notches 11 like those of the preceding figures. In the longer forms of boxes made in accordance with Fig. 9 it is economical to produce the blocks 2a and 2b of comparatively narrow stock, wherefore each block may contain two or more blocks forming the nest for the coins. In such case the bar 8a, which may be made as long as the two or more blocks, serves as an alining member preventing the blocks from lateral displacement one relative to the other, and also preventing any liability of forces directed transversely of the blocks from breaking the rather fragile portions of the ridges 4 where bridging the longitudinal grooves 6. In the construction shown in Fig. 9 and associated figures, the bar 8a therefore serves the purpose of an alining member and of a strengthening member, as well as a division or partition member. In the structure shown in Fig. 1 and associated figures the bar 8 also serves as a strengthening member preventing any transversely directed forces acting on the block or nest 2 in a manner to break those portions of the ridges 4 bridging the groove 6. i

In the commercial form of the invention and one that has proven acceptable upon the market, the box 1 and its cover 12 have been constructed of pasteboard or cardboard, or like material, while the blocks constituting the nest 2 have been made of wood of which material the partition bar 8 or 8a has also been made. In the commercial form of the invention the wooden blocks are made fast in the box or receptacle by nails or otherwise, since it is desirable that these parts should be fastened together in a substantial manner.

rIhe particular materials referred to as used in the construction of the device are not at all obligatory, and other suitable materials may be used in place of those named.

This application is a continuation of my application No. 33,779, iled June 12, 1915, for a coin box, in so far as the structure shown in Figs. l to 8 and Fig. 12 is concerned.

Vhat is claimed is l. A coin box comprising a body member or receptacle and a nest for the coins having spaced transverse grooves adapted to receive the coins with each groove separated at the top edges from each neighboring groove by a narrow ridge or wall, and said nest also having a substantially central longitudinal groove in the face remote from the first-named grooves and intersecting said iirst-named grooves up to the separating narrow ridges or walls and dividing the nest into two longitudinal sections joined by said narrow ridges or walls bridging the longitudinal groove, and a bar of suitable cross-section and of a length substantially coincident with the longitudinal groove and constituting a partition dividing each transverse groove into colin receiving pockets between the bar and the sides of the body member or receptacle.

2. A coin box comprising a body member or receptacle with a nest therein for coins having a longitudinal series of transverse grooves in one face and a longitudinal groove in the face remote from the iirstnamed grooves and intersecting them from their bottom portions for a portion of the distance to the tops of the grooves, and a bar formed separately from the nest and substantially coincident in length with and lodged in the longitudinal groove to constitute a partition common to the firstnamed grooves and dividing each of them into coin-receiving pockets between the bar and the sides of the body member or receptacle.

3. A coin box comprising a body member or receptacle with a block therein formed on the exposed face into a longitudinal series of transverse grooves shaped to receive coins on edge and provided with a longitudinal groove of substantially rectangular crosssection in the face remote from the coin receiving grooves and of a height to intersect said coin receiving grooves, and a bar of substantially rectangular cross section lodged in the longitudinal groove and of a length to be common to a plurality of the transverse grooves and constituting a partition dividing each transverse groove into coin receiving pockets between the bar and the sides of the body member or receptacle.

4;. A coin holding means, comprising a block having a series of transverse grooves in one face shaped to receive coins on edge and a groove in the opposite face extending longitudinally of the series and intersecting or cutting the first-named grooves from the bottoms of the latter toward the tops thereof and stopping short of the tops of the grooves, and a bar of a length equal to the combined Widths of a plurality of the transverse grooves and adapted to the longitudinal groove to constitute a partition for the transversegrooves dividing them into coin receiving pockets between the bar and the ends of the transverse grooves.

5. The combination with a tray-like body,

ofV a nest therein having spaced parallel transversely arranged grooves forming pockets, the said nest being formed With'a slide-Way medially thereofl and longitudinally disposed, and a reversible partition insertible in the slide-Way and having a plurality of notches in one, longer edge. to register with the pockets.

6. The combination With a tray-like body, of a nest therein having spaced parallel transversely arranged grooves forming pockets, the said nest being formed with a Aas my own, I haveV hereto aiXed my signature in the presence of Vtwo Witnesses.

ALBERT LONSON.

Witnesses:

P. W, SHARP, THEO. TANDBERG.

Copies of: this patent may be obtained for ve cents each, 'by addressing the Commissioner of Patents,

Washington, D. C??

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4947995 *Mar 9, 1989Aug 14, 1990Universal Co., Ltd.Coin inlet
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/49.1
Cooperative ClassificationA47F5/01