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Publication numberUS1219731 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 20, 1917
Filing dateJun 1, 1915
Priority dateJun 1, 1915
Publication numberUS 1219731 A, US 1219731A, US-A-1219731, US1219731 A, US1219731A
InventorsEdward Hall
Original AssigneeJersey City Printing Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Plural-image device.
US 1219731 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. HALL.

PLURAL IMAGE DEVICE.

APPLICATIUN r|LsD1uNE1.1s|5.

Patented Mal'. 20, 1917.

2 SHEETS--SHEET 2.

EDWARD HALL, OF RUTHERFORD,

COMPANY, 0F JERSEY CITY,

NEW JERSEY, ASSIGN OR TO JERSEY CITY PRINTING NEW JERSEY, A CORPORATION 0F NEIV JERSEY.

PLURAL-IMAGE DEVICE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Mar. 20, 1917.

Application filed J une 1; 1915. Serial No. 31,378.

To all 'whom t may concern.'

Be it known that I, EDWARD HALL, a citizen of the United States, residing in Rutherford, county of Bergen, and State of New Jersey, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Plural-Image Devices, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to a device which is particularly useful for advertising, educational or amusement purposes.v The device consists essentially of superimposed images in different or contrasting colors associated with means for causing one of the images to become substantially invisible, whereby another will be made prominent. l

In the accompanying drawings which form a part of this specification, Figure 1 is a perspective view of one type of my device; Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view of the device of Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a front elevation, parts being cut away to show the internal construction, of a modified form, of which Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view; Fig. 5 is a partially diagrammatic View illustrating a further embodiment of my invention; Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 5 showing the same structure but at a different cycle; Fig. 7 is a vertical sectional view of a' portion of the construction of Figs. 5 and 6; Fig. 8 is an elevation of a pair of ray filters; and Fig. 9 is a similar view of a single ray filter.

`Referring to the drawings in detail, the numeral 1 indicates a box, in the front of which is an opening 2. Mounted in any suitable way near the back of the box is a support'3 carrying the image plate 4. This plate bears a plurality of superimposed images, the separate images being depicted in contrasting colors. For purposes of illustration I have shown these images to be a boy 5 and a yacht 6. The picture of the boy may be in green and that of the yacht in red. These images may be formed on opposite faces of the plate 4, provided the plate is transparent, or they may be drawn or otherwise inscribed upon a single surface. At the top and bottom of the support 3 are the rollers 7 and 8 which carry an endless transparent band, one-half, 9, of which is colored geen, and he other half. 1.0. is

which is covered by the red colored red. In the drawings, vertical linlng represents red and horizontal lining represents green. A motor 11 8 through the agency of a belt 12. A source of illumination, such asthe incandescent lamp 13 may be placed'in the front of the boX, or daylightor external artificial light may be relied upon.

The operation of the device is as follows: A person viewing the apparatus from the front through the aperture 2 will sce that part of the red image. which is covered by the green portion of the band, and conversely,

will see that portion of the green image band. This is due tocertain well-recognized optical principles. Normally, red rays of light will be reflected back to the eye of the observer by the red pigment or other coloring matter forming the red image. If this image is covered by a transparent screen, also colored red, and the shades are substantially the saine, the eye will perceive only a uniform red field, since the red image will merge with the background. Similarly, the green imagewhen covered by the green transparent screen merely presents to the eye a uniform green field. However, that portion of the red screen covering the image plate will prevent green rays which emanate from the green image from passing the screen and enteringthe eye of the observer. The result will be that the portion of the green field which. is behind the red screenwill appear substantially black to the observer, While that portion of the red field beneath the red screen will be substantially invisible, merging into the general tone of the background. In like manner, that portion of the green field which is beneath the green l screen will be invisible, while that portion of the red field which is beneath the green screen will appear substantially black to the observer.v

The result will be that between the differently the screen passes across the field, the observer will see the picture change in character, as illustrated in Fig. 1 of the drawings. If the screen belt is moving in the direction as the dividing line colored portions of drives the roller portion of the e or moving parts of thefarrow iu Fig. 2 and the lower portion iS green and the upper red, the observer w1ll see above the line of' division the part of the image which is in green,

while below the line of division he will see that portion of the image which is in red 1n the. picture. There will thus be formed a dissolvlng view. lVhen the line of division reaches the lower edge 14 of the partition 15, the field will be completely covered by the green portion of the screen belt, with the result that the entire red portion of the picture will be visible, while the green picture will be invisible. belt covers the image, the green picture will be visible and the red picture will be invisible for the reasons already set forth. Thus, without the use o a projecting device,

involving the images,`a dissolving or plural view is f ormed which vmay be adapted in many startling ways to educational, advertising or amusement purposes. In Figs. 3 and 4 is illustrated a modification which is particularly adapted for signboard or similar purposes. In this case the image plate 4 of the device of Figs. 1 and 2 is replaced by a plate 16 which may be provided with the identical form of images already described. This plate is housed in a box 17 having an a erture 18 at the front through which the o server may View the image. In the lower portion of the box is an inclined partition 19 provided with an aperture 20, behind which is a source of light such as the incandescent lamp 21. In proximity to the aperture 20 is a disk 22 adapted to revolve upon the spindle 23 This disk is transparent and is divided along a diameter into two contrastingly colored fields `24 and 25. For purposes of illustration it may be considered that the eld 24 is formed of green glass, while the field 25 is composed of red glass. A motor 26 causes the slow rotation of the disk by means of a belt 27.

The operation of the device, so far as the effect upon the observer is concerned, is very similar to that of the construction first described. It will be obvious that as the disk is caused to rotate in front of the light aperture 20, green light and red light alternately will be projected upon the image field. Since the green lines of the image appear` green to the eye, because they reflect green rays and absorb red rays, they will appear substantially black when red light only is projected upon them. Simultaneously, the red portion of the image will become substantially invisible for the reason that it will merge into the red/hue of the background, owing to the fact that the entire picture is flooded with red light. Similarly, the red lines of the image appear red to the eye because they reflect only red rays, and when green light is projected upon them they appear substantially black, while, co-

When the red portion of the screen incidentally, background field of the picture,

is made green by the green light projected upon 1t. A

In Fig. 3 the green image (the boy) is represented in full lines and will be seen when the red section of the disk is covering the light aperture. The red portion of the picture (the yacht) is indicated in dotted lines and will only become visible when the green portion of the disk controls the light'.

emanating from the lamp.

In the construction shown in Figs. 5, 6 and 7, different means are provided for causing the alternation in the character of the light projected upon the image. ln this inodilicatioii" the saine screen 16 is utilized, which is held in any suitable manner, as by the support 2S, which may be a portion of a signboard. Situated beneath the hood 2S) at the top of the device are two lights, a red light 30 and a green light 31. These lights are alternately connected to a source of electrical energy 32 through the common wire 33 and the distributing wires 34 and 35 which lead from brushes 36 and 37 forming a part of a fiasher. These brushes are adapted to engage a segmental contacter 39 upon a constantly driven ing connected by the wire 41 to the opposite sideof the source of energy. It will be seen that when the parts are in the position shown in Fig. 5 the current will be led :from the source of energy through the iiasher to the green lamp, while the red lamp will be dark. Similarly, when the parts have disk 40, the contacter bereached the position shown in Fig. 6, the

green lamp Will be dark and the red lamp will be lighted. By this arrangement the picture is flooded alternately with red and green light, with the same result as that attained and described in detail in connection with the structure illustratedein Figs. 3 and 4. Vhen the green light is thrown upon the picture as illustrated in Fig. 5, the red image of the yacht will be visible, as shown, while when the red light is thrown upon the picture, the green image of the boy will-become visible.

In Fig. 8 I have shown a rudimentary form of device consisting of an opaque medium or support 42 provided with a pair of circular apertures 43 and 44. In the aperture 43 is mounted a transparent element 45 which is c 'olored red, while in the aperture 44 is mounted a transparent element 46 colored green. If now an image similar to those already described is viewed alternately through these two disks of colored material, the effect will be similar to that produced by the belt screen of the apparatus of Figs. 1 and 2.

A still simpler form of the device is illusing-frame 17 contains a transparent element -l-S which is colored red. If a picture be formed with the superimposed images, as before, and the green image is of al very pale color, it will be practically unnot-iceable because the eye is impressed with the insistent red image. If, however, the sheet 48 of transparent red material is laid over the picture or the picture is otherwise viewed through it, the pale green lines, being incapable ot' 4reflecting red rays, will turn substantially jet black, while the red image will merge into the general red tone resulting from the action of viewing the picture through the red screen. The result Will be that the green image will stand out in striking vividness.

It. will be obvious that if such a screen as that just described is supported as in the construction of Figs. 5, and 7, a. single red light will bei sutlieient to cause a change in the picture, although thc green lines will always be faintly visible.

While I have described my invention lhronghoutin connection with red and green colors for the contrasting images, it is obvious that other sets of contrasting or primarv colors may be utilized, although I regard the red and green as most advantageous owing to the fact that the-y lend themselves readily to printing and other methods of producing images of the character described.

lVhile I have illustrated and described only certain embodiments of my invention, I realize. that it is susceptible of wide application and I do not desire to be limited to the precise structure shown and described.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

l. In a device of the character described, a plural image formed by superimposed images of contrasting colors, and adapted to be viewed directly by the eye of the observer, a source of artificial light, means for limiting its effective illumination to said plural image, and' automatic means for alternating the character of said illumination in correspondence with said colors.

2. In a device of the character described, a plural image formed of superimposed images of contrasting colors, a source of artificial light adapted to illuminate said image. means for screening the direct light rays from the eye of the observer, means for projecting rays from said source upon said image, and automatic means for alter nating the character of said rays falling upon said image in correspondence with said colors, comprising a continuously rotating color screen.

3. In a device of the character described, a plural image formed of superimposed images of contrasting colors, adapted to be viewed directly by the eye of the observer, a source of artificial light, means for screening the eye ofthe observer from its direct images of contrasting colors, separate sources of artificial light corresponding in number and color to the several images superposed, mea-ns for screening the direct light rays from the eye of the observer, and means for altering the character of light falling upon said plural image in correspondence with said colors.

5. In a device of the character described, a plural image formed of superimposed images of contrasting colors, separate sources lof artificial light corresponding in number and color to the several images superposed, means for screening th` direct light rays from the eye of the observer, and means for altering the character ot light falling upon said plural image in correspomlence -u'ith said colors, said means comprising a flasher.

G. In a device of the characterdescribed, a plural image formed of superimposed images of contrasting colors, a shadow box for displaying same, a source of artificial light, means for screening its direct rays from the eye, and automatic means for periodically alternating the character of said light falling upon said image in correspondence with said colors, adapted to render said separate images successively visible to the naked eye.

7. In a device of the character described, a plural image formed of superimposed images of contrasting colors', and adapted to be viewed directly by the eye of the observer, a source of artificial light, means for screening its direct rays from the eye, and automatic means for periodically alternating the character of said light falling upon said image in correspondence with said colors.

8. In a device of the character described, a variegated picture composed of individual monochromatic pictures having a common background, a frame therefor spaced from said picture, a' source of articia-l light mounted Within said frame, and automatic means adapted periodically to vary the character of light reflected from said picture, and to render the said pictures successively visible to the naked eye.

9. In a device of the character described, a variegated picture composed of individual monochromatic pictures having a common background, a frame therefor spaced from said picture, a source of artificial light mounted Within said frame and invisible to the eye of the observer, and automatic means adapted periodically to vary the character of light reflected from said picture, and to render the said pictures independently visible to the naked eye.

' 10. In a device of the character described, a variegated picture composed of individual monochromatic pictures having a common background and adapted to be viewed directly by the eye, a frame therefor spaced from said picture, a source of artificial light mounted within said frame, and automatic 1( rotatable colorscreen.

' I EDWARD HALL.

Witnesses SEWARD DAVIS.

GERALD E. TERWILIJGER.,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2460221 *Jun 9, 1944Jan 25, 1949Raymond T MoloneyLuminescent amusement device
US2483901 *Jul 10, 1946Oct 4, 1949Alexander G HarrisAdvertising display device
US2560392 *Jun 5, 1945Jul 10, 1951Latrobe Pierre Michel LouisVariably illumined plate
US2654971 *Aug 6, 1949Oct 13, 1953Adglo IncLuminous sign
US2863239 *Oct 11, 1954Dec 9, 1958Bernard R GlukesAnimated indicia by color occlusion
US2915843 *Feb 13, 1956Dec 8, 1959Prism Signs IncSign
US2995981 *Mar 24, 1954Aug 15, 1961Bernard J TamarinApparatus for displaying vectographic prints
US6100869 *Apr 3, 1996Aug 8, 2000Mannesmann Vdo AgDisplay screen device
US6857963 *Apr 20, 2004Feb 22, 2005Tenyo Co., Ltd.Conjuring tool for performing card trick
US6929552 *Mar 23, 2004Aug 16, 2005Patrick Allen HargabusQuick exchange infinity mirror display apparatus and method
US7040993 *Apr 30, 2004May 9, 2006Bert LovittAmusement device with concealed images
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/443, 472/61, 345/32, 345/629
Cooperative ClassificationY02T50/671, G09F13/00