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Publication numberUS1221656 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 3, 1917
Filing dateFeb 10, 1916
Priority dateFeb 10, 1916
Publication numberUS 1221656 A, US 1221656A, US-A-1221656, US1221656 A, US1221656A
InventorsEdward Benson
Original AssigneeEdward Benson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe-lace clasp.
US 1221656 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. BENSON.

SHOE LACE CLASP.

APPLICATION FILED FEB 10. 1916.

Patented Apr. 3, 19.17.

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EDWARD BEN-SON, OF MIAMI, ARIZONA.

SHOE-LACE CLASP.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Apr. 3, 1917.

Application filed February 10, 1916. Serial No. 77,445.

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, EDWARD BENSON, citizen of the United States, residing at Miami, in the county of Gila and State of Arizona, have invented new and useful Improvements in Shoe-Lace Clasps, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to devices for holding in place the bow-knot usually tied in shoe laces, and for preventing the same from untying.

The invention has for its obj ect to provide an efficient and easily applied device of the character stated, and one which is simple in construction, and which can be cheaply manufactured.

WVith the object stated in View, the invention consists in a novel combination and arrangement of parts to be hereinafter described and claimed, and in order that the same may be better understood, reference is had to the accompanying drawing forming a part of this specification.

1n the drawing Figure 1 is a plan view showing the ap-' plication of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the device;

Fig. 8 is a longitudinal section thereof, and

Fig. 4: is a transverse section.

Referring specifically to the drawing, the device consists of two pivotally connected jaw members 5 and 6, respectively, between which the how 7 of the shoe lace 8 is held, the top plate 5 having an aperture 9 in which the knot 10 of the bow is adapted to seat. The two plates are alike in shape, they being oval and slightly concave-convex, the bottom of the plates being the concave side.

The bottom plate 6 has two upstanding hinge lugs 11 at its edge between which lugs seats a hinge lug 12 depending from the top plate 5, and a pin 13 passing through these matching lugs completes the pivotal or hinge connection between the two plates. A small, flat spring 1 1 is fastened to the top of the bottom plate 6 by a screw 15 .and presses against the lug 12 in a way to hold the two plates in closed position, the plates being thus provided with a spring hinge connection.

In the bottom plate 6 are two spaced apertures 16 located on opposite sides of the center thereof. The aperture 9 of the top plate 5 is at the center thereof.

In use, the top plate 5 is swung up from the bottom plate 6 and the device is placed so that the bottom plate fits the outside of the shoe at the top, with the apertures 16 registering with the two top lacing eyes of the shoe. The two ends of the lace are then passed through the apertures 16 and tied into a how 7, after which the top plate 5 is swung down toward the bottom plate to clamp the how, the knot 10 thereof seating in the aperture 9 of the top plate. The device is held in place on the shoe by the lace, and the bow-knot is effectually prevented from untying, the bow being clamped between the two plates.

The concavo-conveX contour of the plates adapts the same to the curved contour of the shoe where the device seats, and it thus fits the shoe closely without detracting from the appearance thereof.

In order that the device may fit over the lacing hooks, the bottom plate 6 has indentations 17 to accommodate said hooks, the indentations being pressed into the plate from the bottom thereof.

The device can be easily and quickly applied and removed, and it is simple in construction and therefore inexpensive to manufacture.

I claim:

1. A shoe lace clasp comprising a pair of opposite pivotally connected clamping jaws located one above the other, one of the jaws having spaced apertures through which the ends of the lace are adapted to be passed to anchor the clasp to the shoe, and the other jaw having a central bow-knot receiving aperture on opposite sides of which the firstmentioned apertures are located.

2. A shoe lace clasp comprising a pair of opposite pivotally connected clamping jaws located one above the other, one of the jaws having spaced apertures through which the ends of the lace are adapted to be passed to anchor the clasp to the shoe, and the other jaw having a central bow-knot receiving aperture on opposite sides of which the firstmentioned apertures are located, the firstmentioned jaw also having bottom indentations at its ends.

In testimony whereof I afix my signature.

EDWARD BENSON.

floptea of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the "Gommissioner of Patents, Washington, D. 0.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2813323 *Jul 2, 1953Nov 19, 1957Gennaro CivitelliShoe lace bow tie holder
US3473198 *Sep 18, 1967Oct 21, 1969Ernest MeierShoe tie retainer
US4485529 *Apr 8, 1983Dec 4, 1984Blum Ronald DReusable tying device
US4553293 *Oct 4, 1983Nov 19, 1985Tie-Tite Products, IncorporatedReusable tying device
US5022127 *Dec 20, 1989Jun 11, 1991Hope Industries, Inc.Shoelace locking device
US8677578Jul 21, 2012Mar 25, 2014Playantra LLCDevice to secure shoelace knot
US20100123039 *Dec 22, 2008May 20, 2010Andreas BuhlTail rotor system and method for controlling a tail rotor system
WO1984004142A1 *Apr 9, 1984Oct 25, 1984Tie Tite Products IncReusable tying device
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/712.2
Cooperative ClassificationA43C7/00