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Publication numberUS1222801 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 17, 1917
Filing dateAug 22, 1916
Priority dateAug 22, 1916
Publication numberUS 1222801 A, US 1222801A, US-A-1222801, US1222801 A, US1222801A
InventorsRudolph R Rosenbaum
Original AssigneeRudolph R Rosenbaum
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for dephlegmation.
US 1222801 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. R. ROSENBAUM.

APPARATUS FOR DEPHLEGMATION.

APPLICATlON FILED AUG.22. I916.

1 %%%,@1 D I Patented Apr. 1?, 1917.

Rudd vi; [6. Rose/26am)? RUDOLPH It. ROSENBAUM, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

- APPARATUS FOR DEIPHLEGMATION.

neeaeor.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Apr. 117, 1917.

Application filed August 22, 1916. Serial No. 116,254.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, RUDOLPH E. Ross:- BAUM, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Apparatus for Dephlegmation, of which the following is a full, clear, concise, and exact descrip-' tion, reference being bad to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification.

My invention relates to dephlegmators and is concerned with an improved construction whereby a process of fractional condensation may be more effectively carried out. It isthe object of my invention to provide such a device whereby a more distinct line than has heretofore been possible may be drawn between materials of a high boiling point and materials of a low boiling point and whereby the methods may be more thoroughly practised to the end of the complete divorce of the materials de-.

sired to be separated. y

While it will appear to those skilled in the art that the dephlegmator of my invention may be used to carry out processes of fractional condensation in connection with any materials having different boiling points, I have in mind particularly a dephlegmator which is well adapted to the separation of high boiling hydrocarbon from low boiling hydrocarbon. In connection with the structure which I propose, I provide means of control whereby the practice of the method is greatly facilitated.

In the accompanying drawlng, which represents a vertical axial, sectional view of the dephlegmator, it will be seen that the main element is in the nature of a drum 1 which is conveniently made of heavy iron in a substantial manner, and, while size may not be important, I might mention a proportion of about six feet in diameter by fifteen feet in height.

Within the drum 1, I'mount, one above the other, a series of pans of cylindrical form 2, 2, these pans being of a diameter less than the interior diameter of the drum so as to leave an annular space around each of them, as illustrated. These pans areconveniently mounted upon angle irons 3, 3.

1 Above each of these pans I mount an annular partition 3, each of these partitions having a reticulated central portion 4, surrounded by a downwardly extending tube 5 passing into the pans 2 immediately below it. About each of the tubes 5, I mount a cooling coil 6, supported in any suitable manner, these three cooling coils being connected in series by means of pipes 7, 7, in each of which a hand valve 8 is disposed. The top of the uppermost cooling coil is provided with the entry pipe 9 and the bottom of the lowermost cooling coil is provided with the exit pipe 10. These cooling.

coils are for the purpose of the circulation of a cooling medium, such as cold water, crude oil, etc.

A stand pipe 11 is mounted vertically alongside the drum 1 and has a lead 12 for each .pan 2, each of these leads extending into an opening near the bottom of the respective pans and being provided with a valve 14. There are also three leads 13, 13, 13, which extend from the stand pipe 11 into the drum to a central position under the respective pans. Each of these pipes 13 is provided with a hand valve 14: and the sets of pipes 12, 13, are separated by hand valves 15, 15 in the stand pipe 11. The bottom of the drum is provided with an exit pipe 16 having the hand valve 17. Near the bottom of the drum a vapor entry pipe 18 is provided and at the top of the drum a vapor exit pipe 19 is provided.

It will now be seen that gases or vapors entering by way of the pipe 18 will have an undulated path first through the first annular passageway, then into the first pan, then up through the first tube, then through the second annular passageway, then down into the second pan, and so on, until they reach the top where they may leave the drum by way of the exit pipe 19, this circuit being traced by the arrows as illustrated.

Let it be assumed now that a mixture of vapors of different boiling points is introduced at the entry pipe 18. Coming in contact with the outside Walls of the dephleg- .bottom of the'drum 1, the portion which is first condensed is deposited in the first pan 2, as indicated. The portion next condensed is deposited in the middle pan 2, and the portion next condensed is deposited in the top pan 2. That portion which may condense before rising to the first annular chamber will be deposited at the bottom of the drum and may be passed out by way of the pipe 16 and may be led back to a still where it may be returned to vapor form and passed back into the dephlegmator if it is considered to contain portions of material of low boiling point. The deposits in the pans may be led therefrom by siphonic action or by suction by way of the pipes 12, 12, under these conditions the hand valves 15 and the valves 14, 14 being opened and the valves 14 remaining closed. The distillin can, of course, take place as often as may fie deemed desirable and the cycle may be repeated, all toward the end of most thorough preparation.

It is a very important feature of my invention that the structure is such that any condensate formed at any of the partitions will drop downwardly in opposition to the upward rise of the vapors, thus causing by friction and agitating contact a thorough and efiective action. .Accordingly, if I desire to resubmit the condensate to this action, I close the valves 15, 15 in the stand pipe 11 and open the valves 14, 14, thus permitting the condensate from the pan above to pass down to a point just above the center of the partition immediately below, thus feeding the condensate to the rush of rising gases to the tube 5. In the perforations in the partitions the condensate meets the gases in the form of a spray so as to enhance the action which has just been referred to. p

In order to watch the action of the dephlegmator and to control it I provide thermometers 20, 20 at the intervals shown in the drawings.

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that only one chamber may be used or more than three may be used, it being clear, particularly as evidenced by the'appended claims that any number is contemplated. It will also be clear that any cooling medium may be used, such as water, oil or other liquid or gas. The cooling coils may be either separate or in series, as described, and it Will be noted that I admit the cooling liquid at the top and allow it to exit at the bottom, this flow being the reverse of the direction of flow of the gases through the drum. Thus, the gases in the hottest condition strike the cooling medium in its warmest condition and as the gases rise they strike the coldest point at the top so as to deposit the last vestige of high boiling material.

I claim:

1. In a dephlegmator, a drum having an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top, a pan mounted therein and surrounded by an annular space, a partition over said pan, said partition having a central opening, a tube surrounding said central opening and extending downwardly into said pan, and cooling pipes around said tube.

2. In a dephlegmator, a drum having an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top, a vertical series of pans mounted therein and each surrounded by an annular space, a partition over each pan, said partitions having central openings, a tube surrounding each opening and extending downwardly into the respective pan, and cooling pipes around each of said tubes.

3. In a dephlegmator, a 'drum havingan inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top, a vertical series of pans mounted therein and each surrounded by an annular space, a partition over each pan, said partitions having.

central reticulated areas, a tube surrounding each said areas and extending downwardly into the respective pan, and cooling pipes around each of said tubes.

4. In a dephlegmator, a drum having an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top, a vertical series of pans mounted therein and each surrounded by an annular space, a partition over each pan, said partitions having central openings, tubes surrounding said openings and extending downwardly into the respective pans, cooling pipes around each said tubes, and a system of piping for conve ing away condensates in said pans.

5. n a dephlegmator, a drum having an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top, a vertical series of pans mounted therein and each surrounded by an annular space, a partition over each pan, said partitions having central openings, tubes surrounding said openings and extending downwardly into the respective pans, cooling pipes around each said tubes, and a system of piping for conveying away condensates in said pans, and for conveying the condensates of the upper pans to the partitions over the lower pans.

6. In a dephlegmator, a drum having an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top, a vertical series of pans mounted therein and each surrounded by an annular space, a partition over each pan, said partitions having central openings, tubes surrounding said openings, and extending downwardly into the respective pans, cooling pipes around each said tubes, and a system of piping for conveying away condensates in said pans, valves being provided for controlling said system of piping.

7. In a dephlegmator, a drum having an' inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top, a vertical series of pans mounted therein and each surrounded by an annular space, a partition over each pan, said partitionshaving central openings, tubes surrounding said openbeing provided for controlling said system ings and extending downwardly into the reof piping. spective pans, coohng pipes around each said In Witness whereof, I hereunto subscribe 10 tubes, and a system of piping for conveying my name this 21st day of August A. D. 5 away condensates in said pans and for con- 1916.

veying the condensates of the upper pans to the partitions over the lower pans, valves RUDOLPH R. ROSENBAUM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2441730 *May 30, 1944May 18, 1948Us Director Of The Office Of SMethod and means for preservation of blood plasma and the like by freezing and drying
US2475482 *Oct 5, 1945Jul 5, 1949Higgins Ind IncWater distillation unit
US4134450 *Mar 30, 1976Jan 16, 1979Ecolaire IncorporatedSurface condenser with vertically separated tube bundles
US6886362 *Apr 14, 2003May 3, 2005Bechtel Bwxt Idaho LlcFor partial liquefaction of a gas, such as natural gas, on a small scale by utilizing a combined refrigerant and expansion
US7219512May 5, 2005May 22, 2007Battelle Energy Alliance, LlcApparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same
US7591150May 15, 2006Sep 22, 2009Battelle Energy Alliance, LlcApparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same
US7594414May 5, 2006Sep 29, 2009Battelle Energy Alliance, LlcApparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same
US7637122Sep 28, 2006Dec 29, 2009Battelle Energy Alliance, LlcApparatus for the liquefaction of a gas and methods relating to same
US8061413Sep 13, 2007Nov 22, 2011Battelle Energy Alliance, LlcHeat exchangers comprising at least one porous member positioned within a casing
US8544295Oct 28, 2011Oct 1, 2013Battelle Energy Alliance, LlcMethods of conveying fluids and methods of sublimating solid particles
US8555672Oct 22, 2009Oct 15, 2013Battelle Energy Alliance, LlcComplete liquefaction methods and apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/145, 165/159, 165/111, 165/DIG.439, 196/139
Cooperative ClassificationY10S165/439, F28D7/024