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Publication numberUS1230317 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 19, 1917
Filing dateOct 2, 1916
Priority dateOct 2, 1916
Publication numberUS 1230317 A, US 1230317A, US-A-1230317, US1230317 A, US1230317A
InventorsTheodor Norpoth
Original AssigneeT G Ehrhardt, Theodor Norpoth
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Playing-cards.
US 1230317 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

T. NORPOTH.

PLAYING CARDS.

APPLICATION FILED 0012,1916.

Patented June 19, 1917.

BALL FOUR STLOU S TnoqiS 5170.4 TIVQ CH CAFQO 4 baseball playing cards, and consists in the.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

THEODOR NOBI'OTH, OF ST. IDUIS, MISSOURI, ASSIGNOR 0F ONE-FOQRTH TO '1. G. '1, OF CALIFORNIA, MISSOURI.

PLAYING-CABDS.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented June 19, 1917.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, THnoDoR Nonro'rn a citizen of the United States, residing at St. Louis, State of Missouri, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Playing-Cards, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description,-reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part thereof.

My invention has relation to improvements in playing cards, more particularly novel features of denomination and arrange ment more fully set forth in the specification and pointed out in the claims.

In the drawings Figure 1 represents one suit of a pack of cards marked according to my invention; Fig. 2 represents a card of a diiferent suit, marked to correspond with one play of a baseball game; and. Fig. 3 represents a card marked to correspond with a diiferent play in the game.

The object of my invention is to provide a pack of cards comprising a series of suits, the suits representing different baseball teams, and each suit consisting of cards marked to correspond with some play possible in a game of baseball, the valueof the card depending upon the corresponding value of the play in a regular game. Some of the cards will also represent a certain player, as shown in Fig. 1, and will contain a supplemental marking indicating the play, said play being credited to the player repre- Sented by the card. The character of the invention will best be understood from a detailed description thereof in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which-- 1 represents one card of the suit corresponding to the St. Louis team. The card is similarly marked on both sides of a horizontal center line a (like ordinary playing cards) so that it may be read no matter which side is on top. The card 1 is marked along both end margins with the word Pitcher, and has a picture 7) of a baseball pitcher on both halves of the card in opposed relation. In the upper left-hand corner of the card, and in the corner diagonally opposite, are diamond-shaped figures d, d, in the center of which are letters P, P, the same being abbreviations of. the word pitcher; beneath each diamond, arranged in a column and extending toward the center of the card are the letters of the word St.

Louis, the particular team and suit. Itis,

players are the suits. except two must be thrown out unapparent that placing the diamond containing the abbreviation of the name of the card in the left-hand corner and the name of the team represented thereby beneathv it, the

cards may be held in fan-like formation, as

shown, and still permit their denominations to be readily seen. The cards 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,

7, 8, 9 and 10 are marked S3, F, B2,

(1 ,7 ll ,7 S2, E77, EH77, 7

other cards have pictures (not visible in Fig.

1) corresponding to the notation in the diamond d.

Fig. 2 represents a card 11 of a different suit, viz., that representing the Chica 0 team and is so marked, all of the other mar ings being the same as a like card 10 of the St. Louis suit.

Fig. 3 represents a card 12 of the suit illustrated in Fig. 1, and is similar to the other cards of the suit except that it corresponds to ball four in a ball game and is marked accordingly. It also has a picture of a baseball 6 instead of a player in each half of the card. Let it be understood here that there need be no fixed number of cards to a suit, except that there should be at least nine since the cards are played one to an inning, and a game consists of nine innings at least.

In the present case let us consider all the game played with such a pack could continue to eleven innings if not concluded in mne.

The object of the game and the method of playing it can be more clearly explained y assuming that a game is being played. We will assume that a full packof cards or deck contains eight suits representing the eight teams in either the American or National Baseball Leagues, and that only two going to play. Obviously all HR respectively in the diamonds d (1, etc.,

less each player represents more than one club. last the player's represent the St. Louis and Chicago baseball teams respectively. Then the cards are shuflied and dealt alternately one to each player until the cards are exhausted, which gives each player eleven cards if there are that many in a suit. Let it be understood at this point that the object of the game is to score runs, Which-is done by taking in, as tricks, the cards having a run or run-scoring value. By run value is meant a value corre sponding to the value of the same play in a regular game. For instance, cards '2, 8, 9, and 18, having values or a base-hit, two base-hit, three base-hit, and home-run respectively, are such as are most likely to mature into runs in a regular game, so they have run values and when taken home in a trick count a run for the player taking them if they represent his team. W e will continue With the play; the cards have been dealt and one of the players leads, or plays the first card. Suppose he plays a homerun for the St. Louis team which he represents. Now this is acard of high value and the only cards that his opponent can play that will overcome it and take the trick are those which are marked Out such as card 3-. These cards have run-presenting values. However, it must he a card of the same suit as Was led, t. e. St. Louis card. in other Words he must follow suit or he cannot take the trick With any card. lit after the St. Louis representative plays the home-run card, his Chicago opponent plays a St, Louis card of lesser value (a two-base hit or foul, or in short any card other than one marked @ut) then the St. Louis player takes the trick and scores a run in that inning. He then leads another card, a base-hit, for example. Now if the Chicago player can play a two base-hit or higher card (of the same suit) he takes the trick. ii the suit is the same as he (the Chicago player) represents then he scores a run for each of the run cards, or two in all; if it is the St. Louis suit then neither scores. This is followed for nine innings, or until nine eards have been played by each player, then the player who has scored the highest number of runs Wins the game. if they are tied they continue to play the cards in their hands until one Wins. Should the cards be exhausted before either has a greater number of runs then they are shuiiled and dealt again, and play continues.

Letit be borne in mind that runs can only he scored by taking in run cards of the same suit that the player who takes the trick represents. in determining to Whom a trick belongs the following order of value from greatest down, is adhered to: horn run, three base-hit, tvvo base-hit, hase hll four, hall three (when usedi, ll

was

nastier? ball one (when used), error, strike three, strike tv'vo, strike one (when used), foul, etc. Card 1 marked Pitcher and all other cards that contain the Word Out Will take any other card of the same suit, but they have no run value, their purpose being to shut ofi runs. When cards of run value and of the same suit are played the player vvho plays the card of highest value scores a run for every such run card played, provided they represent the same suit or team that he represents; if taken by a player representing a different suit or team nobody scores.

lit might be mentioned that the number of cards to a suit is immaterial since they do not all have to he used, but it is advisable to have at least nine so that a full game of nine innings, as already explained, can he played Without redealing the cards @hvi'ously the invention may be modified Without departing from the spirit of the same.

Having descrihed my invention what I claim is:

l. In a pack of cards comprising a series of suits, suitable number of cards in each suit, said cards being horizontally divided into halves, the halves being similarly marked in opposing relation, one or said,

markings being adjacent the outer edge of each half of the card, another being disposed along the left hand margin of each halt of said card when the half is in its normel pwition, former marking designating the value of the card, the latter desighating-the denomination of the suit, said first mentioned marking being supplemented by abbreviation disposed along the margin aliove the marking giving the denomination, some or said cards being further marked by the Word Cut or its equivalent, substantially as set forth.

2. In a pack of cards comprising a series of suits, a suitable number of cards in each suit, mid cards being horizontally divided into halves, the halves heing similarly marked in opposing relation, one of said markings being adjacent the outer edge of each half of the card, said markings designating the value of the card corresponding to the value of a play incident to a ball game, all of the cards in a suit having difterent values, all the cards or each suit having corresponding values, markings disposed along the left hand margin of each half when that half is right side up, said markings designating the denomination of the suit, and the first mentioned marl igs beingsupplemented by an abbreviation disposed above the denominational markings.

3.. a pack of cards comprising a series of suits, a suitable number of cards in each suit, said eards having markings adjacent upper edge of the card, jlurther markings being disposed along the left hand margin of each card when the card is held upright, the former marking designating the value of the card, the latter designating the denomination of the suit, said first mentioned marking being supplemental by an abbreviation disposed along the margin above the marking giving the denomination.

4. A playing-card being provided with a suitable marking along one edge of the card, a second marking along one edge of the card, a second marking disposed along an edge at right angles to the first mentioned edge, the one marking designating the value of the card, the other designating the denomination of the suit to which said card belongs, the former marking being supplemental by an abbreviation placed in the corner of the card between the two marginal markings.

5. In a pack of cards comprising a series of suits, a suitable number of cards in each suit, said cards being divided in halves, the halves being similarly marked in op posing relation, one of said markings being adjacent the outer edge of each half of the card, another being disposed along the left hand margin of each half of said card when the half is in its normal position, the

THEODOR NORPOTH. Witnesses HARRY A. BEIMES, J 0s. A. MICHEL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5145173 *Apr 15, 1991Sep 8, 1992The Pent CorporationBaseball game
US20070015562 *Jul 14, 2005Jan 18, 2007Xpert Enterprises, Inc.Fantasy football poker
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/298, 273/305, D21/382
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/02