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Publication numberUS1235172 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1917
Filing dateSep 7, 1916
Priority dateSep 7, 1916
Publication numberUS 1235172 A, US 1235172A, US-A-1235172, US1235172 A, US1235172A
InventorsGeorge F Day
Original AssigneeRobert L Warner
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sight for firearms.
US 1235172 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

UR 102359172 SR m/1* R. L. WARNER & G. F. DAY.

SIGHT FOR FIREARMS;

APPLI CATION FILED SEPT. 7, i916 i1 ,235, 1 72, Patented July 31, 1917.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

ROBERT I4. WARNER, 0F CONCORD, AND GEORGE IE. DAY, OF NEEDHAM, MASSACHU- SETTS; SAID DAY ASSIGNOR T0 SAID WARNER.

SIGHT FOR FIREARMS.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented July 31, 1917.

Ta all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, ROBERT L. WARNER, of Concord, in the county of Middlesex and State of Massachusetts, and GEORGE F. DAY, of Needham, in the county of Norfolk and said State, have invented a new and useful Sight for Firearms, of which the following is a specification.

Our invention relates to that type of sight in which a rotary member has operative portions at different distances from its axis to cause changes in elevation of the sight member.

One feature of our invention is such a rotary member combined with an intermediate member to move the member carrying the sight.

Another feature is the mounting of the rotary member on the base for the sight member.

Another feature is the location of the rotary member at that end of the sight member which is toward the user.

Other features will be pointed out below.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan of a sight embodying our invention;

Fig. 2 is an elevation thereof;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged diagrammatic view, the rotary notched member being in section on line 33 of Fig. 4; and

Fig. 4 is a detail plan showing the rotary notched member.

, Upon the firearm A is mounted base B having worm b to cooperate with gear I) so as to shift the base on the pivot 12 to allow for windage. Upon the base is mount ed shaft 5 which is the pivot for frame D carrying sliding sight D, this frame and sliding sight being familiar to those skilled in this art. A novel feature, however, consists in providing a sighting portion d which is an open sighting notch in the form shown.

Mounted on shaft 6 is rotary member E the shaft being suitably upset at its ends to hold the frame and rotary member E against undesired axial movement but permitting relative rotary movement between them.

The rotary member E is provided with a plurality of grooves or notches e, 6, e 6 and 6*, the inner portions of the grogves being at progressively increasing distances from the axis of the rotary member E, the inner portion of groove e being nearest said axis and the inner portion of groove 6 being farthest from said axis.

Pivoted to the base B at f is rocking lever F having a nose 7 at one end to engage said grooves and having an inturned nose f at the other end to engage the under side of frame D. A slot f on lever F cooperates with pin 7 on the base to limit the movement of said lever. When the parts are in the position shown in Figs. 2 and 3 the sight opening d is in its lowest position, such as might be used if the object were one hundred yards away, the number 1 being conveniently discernible to the user on top of the rotary member E. Rotation of member E in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 3 will bring groove 6 into engagement with nose f and so on with the other grooves by further rotation of member E. This will result in gradually lowering nose and gradually raising nose f which consequently raises frame D and therefore the sighting portion (Z as indicated by the several dotted line positions in Fig. 3.

Rotation of member E is limited in one direction by shoulder 6 nose f then engaging groove e, and in the other direction by shoulder c, nose f then engaging groove 6*.

Nose f is held in engagement with the desired groove by reason of the fact that the frame D presses downwardly on nose f this pressure being due to the flat spring G which bears against frame D at the left of its pivot in the manner well known in this art, this spring acting as is well known to hold said frame elevated as is shown in dotted lines in Fig. 2 in case it were desired to use the sliding sight D for target work for example.

It will be clear that a great advantage of our invention is that the user may keep his eye continually on the object and need not look at the indicating scale in order to bring the desired groove into operation because he can not only hear the click of the nose engaging the several grooves but he can feel the spring resistance as the nose passes from groove to groove. Moreover if the user forgets what the elevation of the sight actually is, he can, without taking his eye from the object, turn member E until one of the shoulders e or c is engaged and then rotate until the desired groove is engaged by the nose f knowing that when shoulder a is engaged the sight d is in its lowest position and when shoulder e is engaged the sight is in its highest position.

A great advantage of our invention consists in mounting on the same base the member E and the body portion of the sight member which in the form shown is frame D.

Another advantage is that our rotary member E is very conveniently located near the user and spaced very considerably from the turn buttons of the worm b and of the slide D.

WVhat we claim is:

1. A sight for firearms comprising a sight member; a rotary member; a lever to transmit motion from the rotary member to the sight member to change the elevation of the sight; and means for supporting said parts in operative relationship.

2. A sight for firearms comprising a springpressed pivotally mounted sight member; a rotary member; a member inter mediate the sight member and rotary member to transmit motion from the latter to the former to change the elevation of the sight; and means for supporting said parts in operative relationship.

3. A sight for firearms comprising a spring-pressed sight member; a rotary member; a lever to transmit motion from the, ro-,

tary member to the sight member to change the elevation of the sight member; and means for supporting said parts in operative relationship.

4. A sight for firearms comprising a sight member; a rotary member having its axis crosswise of the firearm and having an operative periphery at progressively increasing distances from said axis; and a lever, one portion of which engages the sight member and another portion of which engages said periphery, the lever being pivoted between said portions and transmitting motion from the rotary member to the sight member; and means for supporting said parts in operative relationship.

5. A sight for firearms comprising a movable base; a shaft mounted on said base-extending crosswise of the firearm; a sight member pivoted on said shaft; a spring Copies of this patent may be obtained for pressing said sight member toward the firearm; a rotary member mounted on said shaft and having an operative periphery at progressively increasing distances from its axis; and a lever pivoted on said base, one end of which lever engages the sight member and the other end of which engages said periphery to transmit motion from the rotary member to the sight member, said base supporting said other parts in operative relationship.

6. A sight for firearms comprising a sight member a rotary member having a plurality of holding ortions and a plurality of corre sponding indicating symbols, each symbol being at the top of said rotary member when its corresponding holding portion is at the bottom of said rotary member; and a member intermediate of the sight member and rotary member to transmit motion from the latter to the former, said intermediate member engaging the desired one of said holding portions and also engaging said sight member to change the elevation of the latter; and means for supporting said parts in operative relationship.

7 A sight for firearms comprising a shaft extending crosswise of the firearm; a sight member pivoted on said shaft; a rotary member mounted on said shaft and having an operative periphery at progressively increasing distances from its axis; a lever to transmit motion from said rotary member to said-sight member to change the elevation of the latter; and means for supporting said parts in operative relationship.

8. A sight for firearms comprising a sight member; a rotary member having its axis crosswise of the firearm and having a plurality of grooves, the inner portions of the grooves being at different distances from said axis; a lever having a nose at one end to engage the desired one of said grooves and having its other end adapted to engage said sight member to transmit motion from the rotary member "to the sight member; and

7 means for supporting said parts in operative relationship.

ROBERT L. WARNER. GEORGE F. DAY.

five cents e:ach, by addressing' the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. 0.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5254967 *Dec 22, 1992Oct 19, 1993Nor-Am Electrical LimitedDual element fuse
US5355110 *Sep 15, 1993Oct 11, 1994Nor-Am Electrical LimitedDual element fuse
US5720270 *Nov 30, 1995Feb 24, 1998Cobra Manufacturing Co., Inc.Means for adjusting the sight pin of a bow
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/137
Cooperative ClassificationF41G1/26