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Publication numberUS1235274 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1917
Filing dateMar 3, 1916
Priority dateMar 3, 1916
Publication numberUS 1235274 A, US 1235274A, US-A-1235274, US1235274 A, US1235274A
InventorsWilliam H Wood
Original AssigneeWilliam H Wood
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lamp.
US 1235274 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

w. np woou.

LAMP.-. APPLICATION FILED MAR-3.1916.

PatentedJuly 31, 1917.

,3'SHEETSSHEET 1.

mn far W. H. WOOD.

LAMP.

APPLICATION FILED MAR. 3. I916.

Patented July 31, 1917.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

W. H. WOOD.

LAMP; APF'LICATION FILED MAR. 3; i916.

Pdtented July 31, 1917.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3y HUB/7727]- 1' WILLIAM E. woon, or sooner EUCLID, OHIO.

LAMP.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented July 31,1917.

Application filed March 3, 1916. Serial No. 81,785.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that 1, WILLIAM H. WOOD, a citizen of the United States, residing at .South Euclid, in the county of Cuyahoga and State. of Ohio, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement, in Lamps, of

which the following is a full, clear, and exact description, re erence being had to the accompanying drawings.

This invention relates to lamps and more particularly to the reflectors which are employed with lamps such as are used on motor vehicles. The invention, broadly considered, consists'in a reflector which is so constructed as to direct and diffuse rays of light in such manneras will utilize the reflected rays for the purpose of illuminating a particular section of the ground or roadway but will render v such illumination largely, ifnotsubstantially, free from contrasting lights and shadows thus rendering the illumination more uniform in character and more nearly approximating the illumination due todaylight than has been accomplished by devices of this kind heretofore in use. A further object of the invention is to provide a two-part reflector, one.

party at least of said reflector being of the parabolic type whereby rays of light impinging thereupon will be reflected in parallel lines, While the other opposed partof the reflector is arranged with its axis angularly disposed with respect to *the first part or' reflecting surface whereby one of the parts or members of the reflectorwill. direct at 'least's'ome of the rays of light reflected thereby to a different portion of the ground or roadbed than that illuminated; by the other part or member. More limitedly stated, the invention contemplates the provision of a two-part reflector wherein the upper part is a parabolic reflectoroperating in the usual manner while the other art comprises a I parabolic reflector which is adapted and arranged to reflect at least some of the rays of light. impinging thereagainst forwardly and downwardly and ontodifierent parts of the roadbed or ground than are illuminated by the first mentioned reflector. Further and more specifically stated the invention comprises a pair of opposed parabolic reflecting surfaces the axes whereof are arranged at an angle to'each other; also a pair of opposedparabolic reflecting surfaces which are relatively adjustable.

addition to the pair of opposed parabolic reflecting surfaces, my invention comprises the employment, with a parabolic reflecting surfacesuch as the upper portlon of an ordinary parabolic reflector of an opposed reflecting member having certam specific features of construction whereby efl'ective illumination may be secured, the

reflecting surfaces serving to diffuse the rays tical section taken through a standard re- 1 flector shown-in the manner in which my attachment and the lamp are appliedand positioned; Fig. 4 a horizontal sectional view taken through the central portion of the reflector, the attachment being shown in plan; and'Figs. 5 and 7 diagrammatic views, similar to Figs. 1 and 4, respectively, showing the manner in which the various reflecting surfaces of the attachment cooper-' ate with the reflector; and Fig. 6 a diagrammatic view of the front of the attachment showing the manner in which the lateral wings cooperate with a source of light to direct the rays to predetermined parts of the ground or roadway at eachside of the vehicle. a

Describing by reference characters the various parts illustrated herein, 1 denotes an ordinary parabolic reflector having at the rear central portion thereof a neck 2 which is adapted to receive the socket 3 of a lamp 4, the source of light whereof is indicated at 5. The parts thus far described are of 0rdi nary or standard construction.

In practice, only the upper half or portion of the parabolic reflector will be used as the lower part is cut out by the cooperating reflectpr member which, in the exemplification"""o'f. my invention embodied herein, isv

"an a'ttachment comprising a plurality of parabolic reflecting surfaces which are spaced along the direction of the axis'of the reflector and which surfaces are connected by a series of reflecting surfaces, each series comprising a plurality of flat or plane re fleeting faces so united as to form a broken curved surface, each broken curved surface thus formed having its region of concentration in advance of the source of light. Each curved series of flat reflecting faces is connected with the adjacent series by means of a step which is arranged at such an angle as not to reflect any of the rays of light from the source. ln addition to the reflecting surfaces describechthe attachment is provided with lateral wings arranged to intercept certain of the rays from the lamp and to reflect them downwardly and laterally for the purpose of illuminating the roadway or ground in the vicinity of the wheels of the automobile and laterally therebeyond. ln addition to these wing reflectors, the attachment has a small concave reflector projecting upwardly the base of the lamp bulb which serves to direct the rays downwardly.

A denotes the attachment generally cornprising a reflecting body and suitable positioning springs, which will be described hereinafter. The reflecting body is preferably a single sheet of metal and comprises a rear parabolic reflecting surface 6 having an aperture 7 near the upper end thereof which is adapted to receive the socket 3 of the lamp. Above this aperture, there is located the small concave reflector 8 referred to hereinbefore. The attachment is generally semicircular in transverse section and flares or is enlarged outwardly and forwardly from its rear end. At its base, the reflecting surface 6 unites with the first broken curved reflecting surface B, which comprises a plurality of flat reflecting faces 9. The reflecting surface B is set backward from the source of light and is so inclined that no rays of light will be reflected rearwardly of the source of light 5, but these rays-indicated diagrammatically at bwill strike the upper surface of the reflector l at such an angle as will cause them to be directed forwardly and below the horizontal. The action of each .flat face of the reflecting surface B will be referred to hereinafter.

The reflecting surface B is connected with the next reflecting surface C in advance thereof by means of a step 10, this step being preferably arranged so that a plane embracing the same will extend forward of the source of light whereby no reflection will occur from this surface. As will appear from the diagrammatic view in Fig. 5, rays of light from the source reflected forwarlly of the and will strilre the up er ha l flector i in such manner as to 1 flected f dly downwa cated at 0.

by a step 11 to the surface C, such step being arranged similarly to the step 10, whereby no reflection will occur therefrom. it will be observed that the surface C is set in wardly or in advance of the surface D and that the surface D is set inwardly or in advance of the surface E, the purpose being to prevent reflecting any light from the sur faces B G and l) outside the upper part of the reflector 1.

Referring again to Fig. 5, it will be seen that rays of light (Z from the source of light 5 impinging upon the surface D will be reflected to the upper part of the reflector 1 and there will in turn be reflected in the direction indicated by the lines (Z' that is to say. downwardly and forwardly.

The end of reflecting attachment is flarech as indicated at ll, providing a forward parabolic reflector. This reflector and the parabolic reflector 6 reflect rays from the source of light downwardly and "i"( rwai'dl y will appear from Fig. 5, wherein a ray of light 6 from the source of light 5, impinging upon the reflector 6, is directed forwardly and downwardly along the line 6 while three rays of light 6 from the source o light 5 impinging upon the surface E are flected parallel to each other, as indicated 7 the rays 8 Because of the fact that the flector G is a parabolic reflector all of the a s of light will be reflected parallel to each otheras indicated at 6 and will illumii: ate the part of the roadway beyond the rays of light reflected by the parabolic surface E. The broken curved surfaces and the parabolic surfaces of the attachment extend on opposite sides of the axis of the reflector 1 and substantially to the same horizontal plane with said axis. The metal is then bent outwardly to form a front shoulder 12 and a rear shoulder 13 on each side of the axis in substantially the same plane therewith, whereby these shoulders will not serve as reflecting surfaces for the light. From the outer edge of each of these shoulders there projects a reflecting flange 1e and respectively. These flanges proiect inwardly from bottom to top whereby they prevent the rays from the source of light from strik ing the parabolic reflector l at the sides therebehind thereby eliminating the useless and objectionable side rays that are ordinarily thrown such reflectors; in addition to serving this function the flanges 14 and 15 provide reflecting surfaces which direct the rays of light in the manner shown 6 and 7 5 is to say, they direct t forwardly downwardly,

.iese views rays of light v flector 1.

of the surfaces 14 and 15 will be directed not only forwardly and laterally, but that these rays, though diffused, are directed upon the points which it is desired to illuminate, without impinging upon the reflector 1.

In practice, the reflecting surfaces, 14 and 15 efl'ectively illuminate the curb, the Wheels and the ground adjacent to and extending laterally therefrom-the term ground being used generically. They are particularly valuable in illuminating crossroads, streets, or alleys at either side of and in advance of the vehicle. It will be noted further that the wings 14 and 15 are set at an angle to each other and are spaced back. This peculiar construction enables them to operate for the purpose described but without interfering with the reflection of rays from that portion of the reflector 1 thereabove which it is desired to utilize.

The surface 8, being parabolic, reflects any rays of light that may impinge thereupon in a direction parallel to each other and, because of its inclination, in a direction slightly below the horizontal.

Attention has been called heretofore to the fact that each of the reflecting surfaces 13, C and D comprises a plurality of flat faces indicated at 9, 17 and 18, these flat faces being set at an angle to each other, whereby each series of such flat surfaces constitutes a broken curved surface. The purpose of using these flat faces is to greatly diffuse the arays of light which impinge thereupon and are reflected therefrom to the upper surface of the reflector 1. greater the width of each of these flat faces, the greater will be the dilfusion of light rays therefrom to the parabolic reflector 1 thereabove. The width shown in the drawings has been found to be extremely eflicient in that it secures a difl'usion which is, however, sufficiently concentrated as to its limits to secure, with the angular relation of the surfaces .B, C and D, a lighting effect which approximates that obtained by daylight. This effeet is enhanced by the provision of the parabolic surfaces 6, 8 and E, which serve to reflect forwardly and downwardly-but to difl'erent areas of the roadway-the rays of light which impinge thereagainst from the source 5. Furthermore, the angular relation of the surfaces B, C and D to the source of light and to the reflector 1 is such that no rays from these surfaces'escape without reflection from the upper part of the re- Furthermore, these rays are not only all reflected by the upper part of the reflector 1, but they are so reflected that the illuminated zone is confined to a position below .the horizontal, thus preventing any interference with the vision of pedestrians and drivers of other'vehicles'.

In order to obtain the best results from The the use of my attachment, it is necessary that it should be properly positioned with reference to the source of light and to the reflector. More specifically, this attachment should be-so placed and positioned that the '70 two parabolic surfaces 6 and E shall reflect the rays to different parts of the ground than those illuminated by the reflector 1 and then be anchored in place. To permit of conveniently positioning the attachment in this manner, I prefer to use a pair of flat springs, one of which, G, is secured to the back of the attachmentpreferably below the neck 16 thereof through which the lamp socket extends. This flat spring G has a pair of substantially horizontal arms. 9 whichare adapted to-yieldingly engage the back of the reflector 1. In addition to the spring G, a downwardly and forwardly extending spring H is secured to the back of the attachment, conveniently by the same rivet G by which the spring G is secured thereto. This spring H is provided with a slot in which is adapted to receive an anchoring post 19 having its lower end bent, as indicated at 20, whereby it may be inserted through a hole 21 in the reflector 1 and be hooked behind said reflector, the. upper end of the post projecting through a hole in the reflecting surface E and being threaded and provided with a nut 22.

With this construction, the-operator inserts the post 19 in place through the lower wall of the reflector 1, places the socket of the bulb within the neck 16, and pushes the attachment back in place against the yielding resistance of the springs G and H. When the lamp socket is properly positioned and secured with reference to the lamp and the attachment is also in proper functioning 16-5 relation to the main reflector, it is anchored by setting up on the nut 22, against the yielding resistance of the springs G and H. When it is desired to remove the reflector, it is necessary only to disconnect the bulb 11-11 socket and to remove the nut 22, the springs tending to move the attachment outwardly as the nut is slackened.

- The construction just described provides a particularly efiicient means whereby one of the reflecting members may be set and anchored in such position as will secure the most effective illumination, and especially whereby one of two parabolic reflecting surfaces may be set with its axis at the desired angle to the axis of the other; also simple and effective means whereby the adjustment of such members may be secured if desired, although such change will ordinarily be unnecessary after the members have once been set in their desired relative positions.

While I have necessarily shown and described my invention in detail, 1t W111 be obvious that these details may be departed from more or less and that various altera- .130

tions may be made as to th exact construction and relative arrangement of the various reflecting surfaces. 1 therefore do not propose to limit myself to such details except as the same may be positively included in the claims hereto annexed or as such limitation may be rendered necessary by the state of the prior art. lhus, so far as the angular relation of the parabolic reflecting surfaces is concerned, my construction might be embodied in a two-part reflector comprising an upper half-parabolic reflector and a lower half-parabolic reflector.

Having thus described my invention, what l claim is:

l. in a lamp a substantially parabolic reflector having its axis substantially horizontal, a light source substantially upon. said axis, and a second semi-parabolic member located inside said first reflector and beneath said light source and having its axis inclined downwardly relatively to the axis of said main reflector.

2. in a lamp, a substantially parabolic reflector, a light source substantially upon the parabolic axis and located outside of the focal point, and a second reflector member located inside said first reflector adjacent to said light source, said second reflector having parabolic surface whose axis is inclined to the axis of said first surface and whose focal point falls outside of said light source.

3. The combination of a parabolic reflecting part, and a reflecting part opposed thereto and comprising a parabolic reflecting surface and one or more surfaces additional thereto, the parabolic reflecting surface on the second part having its axis angularly disposed with reference to the axis of the first mentioned part, and a light source located on the axis of one of said parabolic surfaces.

4. ln a lamp a parabolic reflecting part and a reflecting part opposed thereto, said last part comprising a pair of parabolic reflecting semi-zones spaced apart longitudinally along the axis of the first part and one or more reflecting surfaces interposed between such zones, the axes of said zones being angularly disposed with reference to the axis of the flrst mentioned part.

5. In a lamp, a parabolic reflecting part, a light source located substantially ugon the axis of said part and slightly outside of the focal point thereof, and a second reflecting part opposed to said first part and comprising a. pair of parabolic reflecting semi-zones having an approximately common axis which axis is disposed at an oblique angle to said first axis, said zones being spaced longitudinally with respect to said an and the portion of said second reflec part b ween said zones contai i t reflecting snrfa inter ect said first axis at a point beyond said source.

6. in a lamp, a parabolic reflecting part,

and a second reflecting part opposed thereto and comprising a pair of semi-zones each of substantially parabolic form disposed about approximately a common El-XlS with their focal points spaced from each other and both forward of the focal point of said first ieniber, the space between said semi-zones being occupied by additional light reflecting surfaces.

7. A reflecting body having a. pair of longitudinally spaced semi-paraboloid reflecting surfaces disposed about the same approximate axis, and a plurality ofsubstantially flat reflecting surfaces interposed between such paraboloid surfaces and having their normals intersecting such common axis forward of the focal points of said paraboloids.

8. A reflecting body having a reflecting portion following substantially the surface of a paraboloid and having at one end a plurality of substantially flat reflecting surfaces whose normals intersect said axis forward of such focal point.

9. ln a headlight, the combination of the light source and a reflector having a substantially parabolic portion arranged to refleet light upon the road, and also having a plurality of flat reflecting surfaces arranged with their normals intersecting the parabolic axis between the focal point and a position half way between the focal point and the free edge of the reflector.

10. In a lamp, a reflector having a parabolic portion and a second portion composed of a plurality of rows of substantially flat reflecting surfaces whose normals intersect the parabolic axis beyond the focus, and a light source located substantially on said axis at a point between the focus and the intersection of said normals, the portion of the reflector body between adjacent rows of flat surfaces being undercut relatively to such source so as to be shielded therefrom.

11. The combination of a parabolic re fleeting part and a reflecting part opposed thereto and comprising a pair of reflecting surfaces constituting parabolic semi-zones spaced longitudinally along a substantially common aXis which axis is inclined at a small angle to the axis of the first mentioned part.

12. ln a lamp, a parabolic reflecting member, a second, reflecting member opposed thereto and having a pair of parabolic sernizones spaced longitudinally along a sub stantially common axis which aXis is inclined at a small angle to the axis of the mentioned member, and a light source ass sourceof light substantially upon the axis thereof, a body inside such paraboloid and having a plurality of reflecting surfaces each of which is arranged to direct rays of light against the opposite wall ofsaid first reflector at a point in front of said light source.

l l. In a lamp, a parabolic reflecting part, a source of light substantially upon the axis thereof, and a second reflecting part opposed to said first reflecting part and comprising a series of angularly disposed reflecting surfaces each of which is arranged to direct light rays from said source against the portion of the first reflector opposed thereto, all of the reflected rays from said last mentioned surface passing through or closely in front of said source but none behind the same.

1.5.lna lamp, aparabolic reflecting part, a source of light substantially upon the axis thereof, and a second reflecting part adjacent to said light source and having a generally semi-paraboloid reflecting surface at the rear of the source of light and a series of angularly disposed reflecting surfaces in front of such semi-paraboloid surface ar-' ranged to reflect light rays from said source past the front of such source against the portion of said first reflecting part opposed thereto;

16. The combination with" a concave reflecting part and a source of light in operative relation thereto, of a second reflecting part opposed to said first reflecting part and having a rear parabolic semi-zone and a front parabolic semi-zone both arranged to reflect rays from said source forwardly, and additional reflecting surfaces arranged between such semi-zones and arranged to refleet rays of light from the source in front of such source and against the surface of the first reflecting part opposed thereto.

17. In a device of the character described, a reflecting body having a rear reflecting portion, a front reflecting portion and one or more reflecting surfaces interposed between such first portions, said first portions being inclined in the same general direction about approximately the same axial line, and said intermediate surfaces being less sharply inclined as regards that line.

18. The combination, with a concave reflector and a source of light within the surface of revolution defined by the-same, of a reflecting body also located within the space defined by said first reflector and comprising a broken curved surface consisting of a plurality of flat faces each of which is arranged to reflect rays from the source in front of such source and against the opposite surface of the first reflector.

19. ln a lamp, a reflector having its upper paitof paraboloid form with its axis substantially horizontal and having at its lower part a plurality of flat reflecting facets arranged to reflect light upwardly against such upper part at points between the source and the free edge of the reflector.

20. In a lamp, a light source, a reflector having a paraboloid surface surrounding 7 said light source, and a substantially flat reflecting surface between said source and said first surface at each side of said source, said flat surfaces being inclined relatively to each other so as to reflect rays from the source forward of the reflector and to the same side of its axis.

21. The combination, with a parabolic reflector and a source of light arranged in operative relation thereto, of a concave reflecting body which is substantially coaxial with said first reflector, said body having marginal lateral portions on opposite sides which project beyond the plane of said axis.

22. A reflecting body having a plurality of semi-surfaces of revolution concentric to the same approximate axis, the margins of said surfaces parallel to said axis having wings extending beyond said axis and inclined toward each other.

23. The combination with a concave reflector and a source of light in operative relation thereto, of a reflecting body comprising a generally concave reflecting surface interposed between said light source and one I rect rays from said source laterally, forwardly and downwardly without impingement against said first reflector.

24. A reflecting body having a concave portion substantially symmetrical about one side of a longitudinal axis, and also having at each side of said axis a wing portion extending above said axis and inclining inwardly toward the opposite wing.

25. The combination, with a parabolic reflector, and .a light source therein, of a reflector body located at each side of said light source and extendingto a point above the level thereof but not overlapping saidsource, the portions of said body above the level of said light source being inclined inwardly toward each other from the bottom to the top and spreading laterally from the rear toward the front, whereby rays of light from the source are reflected from these surfaces downwardly, forwardly and laterally without impinging again% the reflector.

26. The combination, with a parabolic reflecting part, of a second reflecting part arrangedto reflect the light against the opforwardly, downwardly and laterally without impinging against said first reflecting part.

27. The combination, with a parabolic reflector, of a reflector body having one or more surfaces arranged to reflect rays of light in front of the source of light and against the opposedportion of the reflector, said reflector body also having on each side of the source of light one or more reflecting surfaces arranged to intercept the laterally directed rays of light from such source and to reflect the same forwardly, downwardly and laterally through the front of the reflector and without impingement upon such reflector. v

28. The combination, with a reflector and a source of light inoperative relation ther to, of a reflecting body having a parabolic surface below and at the rear of the source of light and one or more reflecting surfaces in front of said parabolic surface and adapted and arranged to reflect rays of light from the source in front of such source and against the opposed portionof the reflector and having on either side of the source of light one or more reflecting surfaces arranged to reflect raysfrom the source laterally downwardly in front of and through the reflector.

29. The combination, with a reflector and a source of light in operative relation there to, of a reflecting body having rear and front parabolic reflecting surfaces and a plurality of reflecting surfaces arranged at an angle to each other and interposed between the parabolic reflecting surfaces, each of such interposed reflecting surfaces being arranged to reflect rays in front of such source and against the opposed portion of the reflector, said reflecting body having on either side of the source of light one or more reflecting surfaces arranged to reflect rays from the source laterally, downwardly and forwardly through the reflector.

30. The combination, with a reflector and a source of light in operative relation there to, of a. reflecting body comprising a plurality of curved reflecting surfaces each consisting of a plurality of flat faces, the reflecting surfaces being arranged at an angle to each other and the flat faces of each surface being arranged to reflect rays from the source of light in front of such source of light and against the opposed surface of the reflector, adjacent reflecting surfaces being connected by a step or shoulder which is arranged at such an angle as will prevent the impingement of rays of light from the source thereagainst.

31. The combination, with a parabolic reflector and a source of light in operative relation thereto, of a reflecting body having a pair of longitudinally spaced parabolic reflecting surfaces with a plurality of reflect ing surfaces interposed between such parabolic surfaces, the interposed reflecting surfaces serving to direct the rays of light from the source of light to a portion of the reflector opposed thereto in such manner that the rays reflected by such portion of the main reflector will be directed toward and below the horizontal axis of such reflector.

32. An attachment for the purpose specified comprising a body having a rear parabolic reflecting surface and a front parabolic reflecting surface, there being a plurality of cuiwed reflecting surfaces interposed between the pair of parabolic reflecting surfaces and arranged at an angle to each other and each comprising a plurality of flat reflecting faces, said attachment having on opposite sides of the top thereof reflecting surfaces which project toward each other from the bottom toward the top and which are outwardly flaring from the rear to the front.

33. An attachment for the purpose specifled comprising a curved reflecting body adapted to be applied to a lamp reflector and having an aperture in its rear wall for the reception of a socket or other portion of a lamp and having one or more springs adapted to engage the, surface of the reflector therebehind, and means whereby said attachment may be anchored to such reflector with the spring or springs in engagement therewith.

3st. The combination, with a reflector, of a reflector body adapted to be interposed between the source of light and a portion of such reflector, and means for securing said body in place, said means comprising a pair of laterally extending spring arms adapted to engage the rear surface of the reflector and a downwardly extending spring adapted to engage the surface of the reflector therebeneath, and adjustable means whereby the said body may be secured to the reflector against the compression of said springs.

35. The combination, with a reflector, of a reflector body adapted to be interposed between the source of light and a portion of such reflector, said body having an aperture for the reception of a portion of the lamp, a flat spring extending transversely of such body below said aperturefa flat spring extending downwardly from the rear portion of such body and having a slot therein, an anchoring post adapted to be inserted through said slot and to engage the rear wall of the reflector, the said reflector body having an aperture for the reception of the forward end of the post, and a nut threaded on the forward end of said post and adapted to force the lower portion of the reflector body toward the reflector against the resistance of said springs.

36. In a lamp having'a parabolic reflector arranged with its axis substantially horizontal and a lamp bulb located substantially upon the axis of said reflector, a second reflector body adapted to be introduced between said lamp and the bottom part of said first reflector, said second body comprising upon its parabolic axis, and a second re- 7 flector body located inside said first reflector adjacent to said light source, said second reflector having a parabolic surface whose axis diverges from the axis of said first reflector, said body also having at each side a wing at and above the level ofv said light source, said wings serving to shield the lateral portions of said first reflector from said light source, and to deflect downwardly,

forwardly and laterally the rays impinging.

thereon. I

38. As an article of manufacture, an auxiliary reflector for lamps of the type wherein an electric light bulb is located substantially upon the axis of a parabolic reflector and near the focal point thereof, said article having an aperture for the reception of said bulb, and supporting parts for .en-. gagement with the main reflector and also having a parabolic portion whose axis is adapted to make an oblique angle with the axis of the main reflector.

39. As an article of manufacture a secondary reflector adapted for use with lamps tilt of the type having a parabolic reflector and an incandescent bulb located upon the axis thereof, said article comprising a concave member having an aperture to receive said bulb, a parabolic portion having its axis approximately coinciding with the center of said aperture but diverging slightly from the axis of said aperture, said article also having a plurality of substantially flat reflecting faces whose normals substantially intersect. said axis at a point not rearward of the filament of the lamp with which the same is used.

40. As an article of manufacture, a refleeting body adapted to be interposed between the light source and reflector of an automobile lamp, and havinga plurality of flat facets adapted to reflect the rays from said source against the face of the main reflector opposite thereto.

4C1. As an article of manufacture, a

source and reflector of an automobile lamp and having wings which project horizontally one at each side of the light source and shield the lateral portions of the main reflector, said wings being warped rela-' tively to the main axis of the lamp so as to throw the light forwardly and downwardly without touching the main reflector.

42..,As an article of manufacture a refleeting body adapted to be introduced beadapted to be secured between the light tween the light source and reflector of an automobile lamp so as to shield the lower side of said reflector, said body being inclined soas to direct part of the rays falling thereon forwardly and downwardly through the face of the lamp and to direct no rays. forwardly and upwardly through the face of the lamp.

43. The combination of a parabolic regflecting member, and a reflecting member opposed thereto and comprising a pair of parabolic reflecting .surfaces spaced longitudinally with respect to, the axis of the first member, the parabolic reflecting surfaces of the second member having their axes angularly disposed with reference to the axis-of the first mentioned member.-

44. The combination, with a parabolic reflector, of a reflecting body having a series I of reflecting surfaces arranged to reflect the light against the opposed portion of the reflector and in front of the source of light,

said body having at each side thereof and extending above the source of hght'reflect ing surfaces arranged to reflect rays of light forwardly and laterally without against the reflector.

45. The combination, wlth a parabolic re-J flector, of areflector body extending above the source of light andvbeing flared out-v wardly from the bottom to thextop and spreading laterally from, the rear toward the front, said body having a plurality of reflecting surfaces so arranged that rays of light from the source are reflected from these surfaces downwardly, forwardly. and

laterally withoutimpingement against the reflector. p f 46;The combination, with a reflector and a source of light in operative relation thereto,-.of1a reflecting body-opposed to said reflector and having a plurality of facets arranged to reflect rays of light from the source in front of such source and agamst the surface, of the first reflector opposed thereto. 5

47. The combination, with a reflector and a source of light in operative relation thereto, of a reflecting body having a rear parabolic surface below, the source of light, a concave surface at the rear of and above the source of light, and one or more reflecting surfaces in front of said parabolic surface and adapted and arranged to reflect rays of light from the source in front of such source of light and against the opposed portion of the reflector.

as. The combination, with a reflector and a source of light in operative relation thereto, of a reflecting body comprising a broken curved surface consisting of a plurality of flat faces each of which is arranged to reflect rays from the source in front of such source of light and against the surface of the reflector opposed thereto.

as. The combination, with a reflector and a source of light in operative relation thereto, of a reflecting body comprising a plurality of curved reflecting surfaces each con sisting of a plurality of flat faces, the refleeting surfaces being arranged at an angle to each other and the flat faces of each surface being arranged to reflect rays from the source of light in front of such source of light and against the opposed surface of the reflector.

50. The combination, with a parabolic reflector and a source of light in operative relation thereto, of a reflecting body having a plurality of angularly disposed reflecting surfaces each reflecting surface serving to direct rays of light from the source to a portion of the reflector and to be reflected thereby toward the horizontal axis of the reflector.

51. The combination, with a parabolic reflector and a source of light in operative relation thereto, of a reflecting body having I a pair of longitudinally spaced parabolic reflecting surfaces with a lurality of reflecting surfaces interposed between such parabolic surfaces, the interposed reflecting surfaces serv1ng to direct the rays of light from the source of light to a portion of the reflector opposed thereto.

52. The combination, with a parabolic reflector and a source of light in operative relationto said reflector, of a reflecting atreflector, said attachment having a plurality of reflecting surfaces some of which are arranged to reflect rays of light. Y

The combination, with a parabolic reflector and a source of light arranged in operative relation thereto, of a reflecting body having a plurality of curved reflecting surfaces arranged at an angle with respect to each other and each surface comprising a plurality of flat reflecting faces.

55. A reflector having an upper parabolic reflecting surface, a source of light, and a substantially flat reflecting surface at each side of the source of light and adapted to reflect rays of light from the source forward and below the axis of the reflector.

56. in a headlight, the combination of a light source and a reflector having a parabolic portion arranged to reflect light upon the road and a plurality of flat reflecting surfaces arranged to reflect light upon said parabolic portion whose normals intersect the axis of such parabola.

57. In a' headlight, the combination of a light source and a reflector having a substantially parabolic portion arranged to re fleet light upon the road and also having a plurality of flat reflecting surfaces arranged with their normals intersecting the parabolic axis between the focal point and a position half way between the focal point and the free edge of the reflector.

in testimony whereof, I hereunto afiz my signature.

WILLIAM H. WOUD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification362/517, 362/296.8, 362/518, 362/346, 362/348
Cooperative ClassificationF21S48/1388