Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1235438 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1917
Filing dateOct 24, 1916
Priority dateOct 24, 1916
Publication numberUS 1235438 A, US 1235438A, US-A-1235438, US1235438 A, US1235438A
InventorsHenry William Chynoweth
Original AssigneeHenry William Chynoweth
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gasolene tank and filter.
US 1235438 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. W. CHYNOWETH.

GASOLENE TANK AND FILTER. APPLICATION FILED OCT. 24. 1916.

1,235,438. Patented July 31, 1917.

v 2 SHEETSSHEEI 1.

45 .1. 7 I 7-0 Cfi'fi50/7E7/T F 6 /a i 7/ V w, .6 g,

A TTORIVEYS H. W. CHYNOWETH.

GASOLENE TANK AND FILTER.

APPLICATION man 001.24, 1916.

1 35,438. Patented July 31, 1917.

g 9&4 [1

UNITED sTAtrns PATENT OFFICE.

HENRY WILLIAM 'CHYNOWETH, F PASADENA, CALIFORNIA.

GASOLENE TANK AND FILTER.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented July 31, 1917.

Application filed October 24, 1916. Serial No. 127,444.

My invention 15 an improvement in gasolene tanks and filters, and has for its object to provide a device of the character specified for use with internal combustion en gines, wherein a main tank or reservoir is provided with an auxiliary tank, the latter having means for causing the sediment in the fuel to be deposited where it may be withdrawn, and wherein the fuel is taken from the said auxiliary tank to the car- 7 bureter through a screen.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal section of one embodiment of the lnvention.

Figs. 2 and 3 are sections on the lines 2-2 and 33, respectively, of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is an end view of another embodiment of the invention.

Figs. .5 to 8 inclusive, are sectional views of other embodiments of the invention.

In the embodiment of the invention shown so in Figs. 1 to 3 inclusive a main tank 1 is provided having a filling nipple 2, normally closed by a threaded plug 3, and the main tank is provided with an auxiliary portion or extension 4, which is the filter, the said extension or auxiliary tank being integral with the main tank, as shown.

A nipple 5 in the bottom of the main tank forms a communication between the main tank and the filter extension, and a pipe 6 leads from the opposite side of the filter extension to the carburetor. This auxiliary tank or filter extension is of greatest depth at its center, as shown, gradually decreasing in depth toward the ends of the main tank and toward the sides thereof, and at the deepest portion a transverse partition 7 is provided, the said partition extending from the bottom of the main tank to near the bottom of the deepest portion of the auxiliary tank. A drain valve 8 is arranged at the deepest portion of the auxiliary tank and directly below the partition, for permitting the contents of the tanks to be drained for cleaning and the like.

The pipe 6 extends through a nipple 9 in the bottom of the main tank, and a plug 10 is threaded through a nipple 11 in the bottom of the auxiliary tank in alinement with the nlpple 9 and coaxial therewith. This plug closes the lower end of the pipe 6, and the said pipe is provided with a lateral inlet opening 12 atthe plug. A cylindrical screen 13 of gauze is connected with the plug, the said screen being approximately concentric with the pipe, and extending from the plug to the bottom of the main tank, so that all of the fuel which enters the pipe 6 must pass through the screen.

In operation, the fuel passes from the main tank, as indicated by the arrows in Figs. 1 to 3, through the nipple 5, beneath the partition 7, through the screen 13 and opening 12 to the carburetor." Any sediment or impurities that may be in the fuel must pass beneath the partition 7, and the said impurities will be precipitated and will remain at the deepest portion of the auxiliary tank, where they may be withdrawn through the drain valve. Any impurities that may pass this point will'be held back by the screen, and will notenter the carbureter.

In the construction of Fig. 4, the main tank 14 is provided with afilling nipple 15 having the closing plug 16, and the auxiliary a.

tank is formed of a flexible pipe 17, communicating at each end with the main tank, and the said pipe is provided at its center with a downwardly offset portion 17*, in which is arrangeda drain valve 18. The inlet end 19, of the pipe communicates with the main tank at the end adjacent to the filling nipple, and at the opposite end the pipe 17 is provided with a T 20. This T is connected with the bottom of the main tank, and the pipe 21 leading to the carbureter extends upward through the main tank, as shown.

This pipe 21 has a lateral opening arranged in the same manner as the lateral opening of the pipe 6, and a plug 22 is threaded into the ,lower end of the T, the said plug carrying a screen corresponding to the screen 13, and extending from the plugto the bottom of the main tank, so that all the fuel which enters the pipe 21 must pass through the screen.

In the embodiment of the invention shown in Fig. 5, the main tank 23 has secured to the bottom thereof an auxiliary tank 24, and this tank 24 is divided into upper and lower compartments by a partition 25. The lower 31 which passes upwardly through an opening forming a communication between the upper and lower compartments.

In the embodiment ofthe invention shown in Fig. 4, any impurities that may be in the fuel will be precipitated at the point 17 a of the pipe, and may be drawn oil through the valve 18. A transverse partition is arranged within the portion l7 of the pipe 17, at the drain valve, acting in the same manner as the partition 7.- These partitions are bafie plates. In Fig. 5, the fuel passes downwardly through the pipe 26 into the'lower compartment, where the impurities are deposited, and the fuel passes upwardly through the screen 31 into the upper compartment, from whence it is withdrawn to.

the carburetor.

In the embodiment of the invention shown in Fig. 6, the main tank 32 has secured to the under side thereof an auxiliary tank 33. This tank communicates with the main tank by an opening 34, and a series of bafie plates or partitions 35 is arranged within the auxiliary tank, depending from the bottom of the main tank. One of the plates 35 is at the center of the auxiliary tank, and one near each end. At the end remote from the opening 34 the pipe 36 leads to the carburee ter, being between the end of the auxiliary tank and the endmost partition.

A plug 37 is threaded through an opening in the bottom of the auxiliary tank at this point, and the said plug carries a drain valve 38 and a cylindrical screen 39, the said screen encircling the pipe 36. The operation of the embodiment shown in Fig. 6 is similar to that of the other embodiments, the tuel passing downward throughthe opening 34 into the auxiliary pipe, where sediment and the like is deposited, and, may be drawn 0E through the drain valve 38.

Inthe embodiment of the invention'shown in Fig. 7, the main tank 40 is provided with an auxiliary tank 41 having a horizontal partition 42 dividing the said tank into upper and lower compartments. The lower compartment communicates with the main tank by a ipe 43, and with the upper con1- partment y an opening or pipe 44 at the opposite end from the pipe 43. This, pipe 44 has a transverse opening at the upper compartment, through which is passed a screen 45, the said screen being connected with a plug 46 which is threaded through an opening in the outer side of the pipe 44.

A drain valve 47 is connected with the lower compartment at the center thereof,

Leas es and it will be evident that any sediment in the fuel will be deposited in thelower compartment, while the purified fuel will pass upward through the pipe 44 and through the screen into the upper compartment, from whence it may be withdrawn by the pipe 48 leading to the carburetor.

In the embodiment of the invention shown in Fig. 8, the main tank 49 is provided with an auxiliary tank in the form of a casing 50 having at each end an upward extension 51 and 52, respectively, the said extensions communicating with the main tank. This tank 50 is also provided with a horizontal partition 53, which divides it into upper and lower compartments. The lower compartment has its bottom hopper-shaped, as shown, and a drain valve 54 is arranged at the lowest portion of the hopper-shaped bottom. Through the extension 52 is passed a screen 55, extending transversely of the extension, and connected with a plug 56 which is threaded into the extension. The pipe 57 which leads to the carburetor leads from the upper compartment. The fuel passing downwardly from the main tank into the auxiliary tank will deposit its sediment in the hoppershaped bottom, and the pure fuel will pass upwardly through the extension 52 and the screen 55 into the uppercompartment, and from thence throughthe pipe 57 to the carbureter.

The object of all of the embodiments of the invention is to compel the fuel to pass along near the bottom of the auxiliary tank, and to move slowly over a considerable distance, thus giving time for the impurities to settle. The fuel remains in the filter orauxiliary tank without agitation, since the auxiliary tank is full at all times. In the usual form of tank, the fuel is in a continuous state of agitation from the vibration of the vehicle and especially so when not completely filled. This agitation holds the impurities mixed with the fuel, keeping the fuel and sediment stirred up so that they will enter the fuel line to the carburetor. With the present construction this is impossible. The

horizontal partitions of the embodiments having such partitions act also as bafile plates 111 the same manner as the vertical,

portions, constraining the fuel to pass near the bottom of the auxiliary tank.

I claim:

1. A liquid fuel tank, comprising a main tank, and an auxiliary tank below the main tank and communicating with the main tank at one end of the auxiliary tank, said auxiliary tank being of greatest depth at approximately the center and decreasing in depth toward its ends and having a "drain valve at its lowest portion, a pipe leading from the oppositewend of the auxiliary tank Hill to the carbureter, and a screen between the auxiliary tank and the said pipe, and means in the auxiliary tank for constraining the the auxiliary tank and the said pipe, and fuel to flow near the bottom of the said tank. means in the auxiliary tank for constrainin 13 2. A liquid fuel tank, comprising a main the fuel to flow near the bottom' of the sai tank, and an auxiliary tank below the main tank.

5 tank and communicating with the main tank HENRY WILLIAM GHYNOWETH.

at one end of the auxiliary tank, a pipe lead- Witnesses: ing from the opposite end of the auxiliary JAMES B. JOHNSON,

tank to the carbureter, and a screen between FRANK PARSONS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2539820 *Apr 6, 1948Jan 30, 1951Frederic Duchesneau AlfredSlush trap
US2979205 *Apr 8, 1959Apr 11, 1961Int Harvester CoHydraulic tank and radiator guard
US3306454 *Sep 24, 1962Feb 28, 1967Webb Edmond FFluid container with contaminantcollecting means
US4147269 *Nov 14, 1977Apr 3, 1979Werts David AFuel oil storage tank
US4457332 *Apr 5, 1982Jul 3, 1984Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaTank for storage of a suspension
US4587992 *May 17, 1984May 13, 1986Thompson Donald EHydraulic reservoir with contamination separation
US5287717 *Apr 3, 1992Feb 22, 1994Custom Metalcraft, Inc.Method for forming a tank bottom
US5331873 *Mar 4, 1993Jul 26, 1994Custom Metalcraft, Inc.Trim machine for trimming formed sheet material
US5474205 *May 2, 1994Dec 12, 1995Custom Metalcraft, Inc.Tank bottom and tank top
US5701776 *Jun 14, 1995Dec 30, 1997Custom Metalcraft, Inc.Sloped bottom tank
US5868946 *Jul 21, 1997Feb 9, 1999Nguyen; VietWater and solid debris are separated from gasoline during its storage by gravity into lower section of container
US5878902 *Dec 4, 1996Mar 9, 1999Custom Metalcraft, Inc.Sloped bottom tank
US5928507 *Jun 3, 1997Jul 27, 1999Filtertek, S.A.Fuel filter
US5975257 *Jun 19, 1997Nov 2, 1999Komatsu Mining Systems Inc.Method and apparatus for separating steering oil and brake cooling oil within a hydraulic tank
US6575309Jul 13, 1999Jun 10, 2003Filtertek Inc.Filter for fluids
US6736273Feb 8, 2002May 18, 2004Filtertek Inc.Filter for fluids, especially fuels
US6932233 *Dec 3, 2002Aug 23, 2005Les Reservoirs De L'estrieFuel oil tank with evacuation channel
US7306768Feb 20, 2004Dec 11, 2007Filtertek Inc.Economical production of filters and housings for medical and lab use, housing, cover, inlet, spring levers with hook-shaped projections, filter assembly can clamp a filter membrane or media sheet between the cover and the bottom part in a fluid-tight manner.
US8372278 *Mar 21, 2012Feb 12, 2013GM Global Technology Operations LLCLiquid fuel strainer assembly
WO1982003825A1 *May 4, 1981Nov 11, 1982Caterpillar Tractor CoFuel tank assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/172.3, 220/501, 220/DIG.600, 137/545, 137/546, 220/562
Cooperative ClassificationY10S220/06, B01D35/0273