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Publication numberUS1237222 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 14, 1917
Filing dateAug 26, 1916
Priority dateAug 26, 1916
Publication numberUS 1237222 A, US 1237222A, US-A-1237222, US1237222 A, US1237222A
InventorsWilhelm Gotthilf Schroeder
Original AssigneeWilhelm Gotthilf Schroeder
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arrangement for homogenizing liquids.
US 1237222 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

w. G. SCHRDER.,

ARRANGEMENT FOR HOMOGENIZING LIQ'UIDS.V

APPLICATION FILED AUG.`26. 1916. l l 1,237,222., Pa1en1ed11ug-111917.

2 SHEETS-SHEET I.

W. G. SCHRDER.

ARRANGEMENT FOR HOMOGENIZING LIQUIDS.

APPLICATION FILED AUG.26|1916.

Patented Aug. -14, 1917.

2 SHEETS-SHEET' 2.

oFF

WILHELM CCTTHILF SCHRDER, 0E LBECK, GERMANY,

ARRANGEMENT FIOR HOMOGIENIZING LIQUIDS.

.genizing signifies the levigating or grinding down of liquids which would otherwise not mix with each other, under a high pressure; by such grinding or levigating the said liquids are mixed in such a manner, that it will no more be possible for them to separate according to their respective yspecific gravities. In order to attain this object the liquid to be homogenized is forced between two surfaces tightly pressed against each other, of which the one surfacernay rotate oppositely tothe other. These homogenizing surfaces generally have the form of male or female cones. The liquid was generally made to enter at the smaller radius of the homogenizer and leave it at its larger radius. When the gap Abetween the male and the female cone is .equally wide at all points, the specific grinding elfect will be largest at the entrance end, and be smallest at the discharge end, where the cone is of the larger radius. .5;

With the object of avoiding this it has been suggested to employ cones 'which are stepped, and the gap between which can be adjusted, either by^adjusting the steps in the wall of the casing, or by regulating the steps of the cone. According to the present 1nvention an emulsive effect increasing continuously from the entrance endto the discharge end is obtained, by introducing the liquid at the end of the emulsive body having the larger diameter and allowing of the liquid being discharged at the end having the smaller diameter.

In the accompanying drawing homogenizing apparatus of the hereinbefore specivlied novel form are exemplified. Figure l is a section through such an arrangement. Fig. 2 is a section through another construc- .tional form. Fig. 3 is a section on the line B--B in Fig. 2.

In the constructional form shown -in Fig. l, a is the casing, into which the liquid to be Specification of Letters Patent.

q Application filed August 26,

' of'which, in such case,

Patented Aug. Mc, 1917. 191e. serial No. 117,108. i

homogenized enters at E, and which is conically shapedat b. In this female cone the liomogenizer c revolves, the spindle d of which leads through a suitable stuiiing .gland out of the casing and has fitted to its outside end a cord pulley e, which maybe driven by any suitable means, so as to rapidly rotate the cone during the'homogenizing process. This rotation may, however,

also be produced by other means; so, for eX- ample a suitable part, attached to the cone, might be constructed in form of a turbine, `or beprovided with helical passages, so that the liquid running through will cause the cone itself to 'rotate like a turbine. Between the male cone C and the female cone Z) a narrow gap is left, through which the liquid must pass; in order to facilitate the liquid passing from the casing a to the gap, the

cylindrical part of the cone is provided with notches fl The liquid flows in such a. manner through the gap that the sectional area of the liquid body to be considered will decrease continuously, although the width of the gap remains constant. This is obtained by the said area being in direct proportion to the product of the respective radius and the width of the gap. At the entrance of the liquid the area is m r/l, in the middle r/Q and at the discharge r/S. At the rate at which r/l is larger than 1*/2 and 9/2 larger than N3, the passa-ge area will decrease, so that a continuously increasing effect in the treatment of the material to be homogenized is obtained. The cone will practically submit the material along its first part to a preliminary grinding, homogenize it along its second part, and levigate it at the discharge to a still greater ineness. This is all obtained without it being necessary to readjust the apparatus, as the wear will, and particularly when the cone is revolved, be equal at kall points.

For allowing of an adjustment the spindle d is j ournaled on a lever 71. pivoted in the frame g,- the free end of this lever bears against a set screw z'. By adjusting this screw, therefore, the pressure in A, and the degree of iineness of the homogenization y may be varied.

tained by employing a stepped cone or some other shape of the homogenizer, the surfaces need not be adjustable.

With the arrangement according to the present invention it is essential that the cone has a suiiciently large apical angle of about 90o or more. It may even be made in form of a plate, that is to say, as a cone with an apical angle of 180.

In the constructional form according to Figs. 2 and 3 the cone is driven on 'its rear by turbines. As may be seen from Fig. 3, also here the liquid enters at E, acts on the turbine vanes lml and thereby causes the cone to rotate. 'Ihe cone has several grooves nl, 11,2, n3 cut into it, which make a series of cone sections c1, c2, c3, 04 so that iin each of said grooves the material which has been ground along the preceding section is mixed. 'Ihe cone is supported at top and bottom by a step point. The upper spindle D at the same time serves as a guide for the turbine, which must be cast in one piece with the cone.

I claim- 1. An arrangement for homogenizing liquids comprising a stationary body having an inverted hollonT rusto-conical chamber therein, and a rotating body having a frusto-conical portion fitting in but spaced slightly away from said chamber, means for adjusting the position of said rotating body relative to said chamber, means for supplying the liquid to be homogenized to the larger end of said chamber and for carrying it away from the smaller end of said chamber, and means for rotating said rotary body, substantially as described.

2. An arrangement for homogenizing liquids comprising a stationary body having a cylindrical shell terminating in an inverted hollow frusto-Conical chamber therein, and a rotating body having a cylindrical portion with aXia-l slots therein, and having a frustoconical portion fitting in but spaced slightly away from said chamber, means for adjusting the position of said rotating body relative to said chamber, means for supplying the liquid to be homogenized to the larger end of said chamber and for carrying it away from thecsmaller end of said chamber, and means for rotating said rotary body, substantially as described.

3. An arrangement for homogenizing liquids comprising a stationary and a rotating body spaced apart to leave a narrow gap between them, means for supplying the liquid to be homogenized to the larger end of the rotary body and for carrying it off from the smaller end thereof, a spindle for said rotary body, means for rotating said spindle, a lever having an arm forming a journal bearing for the lower end of said spindle, and a set screw also engaging said lever for raising or lowering said spindle through the desired distance, substantially as described.

In testimony, that I claim the foregoing as my invention, I have signed myname in presence of two witnesses, this 6th of June, 1916.

WILHELM GOTTHILF SCHRDER.

Witnesses:

HENRY IIASPER,

N F. JENNINGS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2858083 *Apr 15, 1953Oct 28, 1958Nat PaintDispersion apparatus
US4030707 *Sep 15, 1975Jun 21, 1977Electronic Data Controls CorporationBlender
US4384788 *Nov 6, 1980May 24, 1983Basf AktiengesellschaftSelf-supporting stirrer for mixing a bed of free-flowing solids
US4464259 *Sep 30, 1982Aug 7, 1984Air-O-Lator CorporationHydraulic horizontal mixer
US5902042 *Jul 14, 1997May 11, 1999Dow Corning Toray Silicone Co., Ltd.Continuous mixer for liquids with rotor and casing gap adjustment
US6502979 *Nov 20, 2000Jan 7, 2003Five Star Technologies, Inc.Device and method for creating hydrodynamic cavitation in fluids
US7086777Nov 20, 2001Aug 8, 2006Five Star Technologies, Inc.Device for creating hydrodynamic cavitation in fluids
US8568019 *Jun 1, 2012Oct 29, 2013Talisman Capital Talon Fund, Ltd.Mixing apparatus for manufacturing an emulsified fuel
US20030142582 *Feb 11, 2003Jul 31, 2003National Research Council Of CanadaExtensional flow mixer
US20040042336 *Nov 20, 2001Mar 4, 2004Kozyuk Oleg VDevice and method for creating hydrodynamic cavitation in fluids
US20040160855 *May 17, 2002Aug 19, 2004Guido RivoltaStatic mixer and a process for producing dispersions in particular dispersions of liquid fuel with water
US20120281496 *Jun 1, 2012Nov 8, 2012Waldron Jack LMixing apparatus and method for manufacturing an emulsified fuel
US20140096436 *Dec 6, 2013Apr 10, 2014Talisman Capital Talon Fund, Ltd.Mixing apparatus and method for manufacturing an emulsified fuel
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/286
Cooperative ClassificationB01F7/161