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Publication numberUS1238939 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 4, 1917
Filing dateMay 31, 1916
Priority dateMay 31, 1916
Publication numberUS 1238939 A, US 1238939A, US-A-1238939, US1238939 A, US1238939A
InventorsRaymond J Pfleeger
Original AssigneeRaymond J Pfleeger
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil-pump.
US 1238939 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. J. PFLEEGER.

OIL PUMP.

APPLICATION FILED MAYS 1916.

Patented Sept. 4, 1917.

RAYMOND J. IPFLEEGER., OF DEERFIELD, NEW YORK.

OIL-PUMP.

Specication of Letters Patent.

Patented Sept. d, 191'?.

Application filed May 31, 1916. Serial No. 100,828.

To all whom t may concern:

Be it known that I, RAYMOND J. PFLEEGER, a citizen of the United States residing at Deerfield, in the county of Oneida and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Oil-Pumps, of which the following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings.

This invention relates to oil pumps and particularly to pumps designed for forcing lubricant to the various parts of an engine and more particularly to various parts of an automobile, motorcycle or other like construction. Engine lubricators should be positive in action and should be so constructed that the lubricant will not be supplied in excess of the requirements. Y*

Furthermore the means for feeding lubricant should be automatic and require but little attention by the operator. The oil feed should start as soon as the engine starts and stop when the engine stops and, with internal combustion engines, the oil feed should be automatically controlled, not necessarily by the speed of the engine, but in correspondence with the fuel feed of the engine. Thus, for instance, when an auto- -mobile is going up a hill on a long steady pull, a much greateramount of lubricant is necessary than where the engine is running rapidly on a level road and yet, at thistime,

' when the engine is moving up hill, the rate of rotation of the crank shaft, as an example,

ismuch less than when the engine is mov-- ing along a smooth and level road.

With these considerations in view, one object of my invention is the provision of an oil pump of an extremely simple construction having few parts and these not liable to get out of order and in which no movable valves in the ordinary course are used which are liable to get out of order, which require to be ground or otherwise kept in shape and which are liable to be clogged.

A further object of the invention'is to provide a pump ofthe character described in which the range of reciprocation of the pump piston may be regulated and, in this connection to provide means whereby this range of reciprocation may be regulated in accordance with the position of the throttle valve of the engine and thus the pump be regulated in correspondence, not with the speed of the engine, lbut with the fuel feed for the reasons before` stated.

A further object of the invention is to provide positive means for reciprocating the plston on both strokes thereof and provide a means which will provide for a very steady but relatively slow stroke of the piston, this stroke being steady and even throughout its entire extent.

Other objects will appear in the course of the following description.

My invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings wherein,

Figure 1 is a sectional view of a pump constructed in accordance with my invention and showing the piston orl plunger in its outermost position at the time when the oil 1s being drawn into the pump barrel;

Fig. 2 is a sectional view through one end of the barrel beyond the inlet and outlet ports, this view showing the piston in end elevation; i

Fig. 3 is a sectional view Aon the same plane vas Fig. 1, but showing the piston at its innermost position; l

Fig. 4: is a like view to Fig. 2 showing the rotative position of the piston in Fig. 3, the piston being in elevation; and

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the piston and the cam 44, this figurev being on a reduced scale.

The pump barrel 5 is cylindrical and has `the cap 6 are the inlet and outlet ports 7 and 8 respectively and'entering the inlet port 7 'is a pipe 9 which is shouldered at 10, while extending from the outlet port 8 is a pipe 12, shouldered lat v13, both of these pipes having preferably., screw-threaded engagement with the pipe barrel. The pipe 9 is connected to any suitable source of oil, while the pipe 12 is connected to the part or parts to be lubricated. The barrel, intermediate its ends is longitudinally slotted,

as at 16 for a purpose which will be later stated. f

Operating within the barrel 5 is a relatively long and solidpiston 28. This piston has rotative movement therein. For the purpose of'causing rotative movement of the 4piston within the barrel, the piston is formed at its outer end with a many-sided socket 36 within which operates the manysided head 29 carried bythe shaft 30. This shaft may be driven in any suitable manner but, as illustrated, carries a worm wheel 31 held in place by a nut 32, this worm wheel being driven by a worm 33 mounted on a shaft 34, this shaft in turn being driven by a gear wheel 35 from any suitable mechanism.

For the purpose of causing a reciprocating movement of the piston, I form the piston with an annular recess and with an annular cam flange, which I shall hereafter describe as a cam 44. This flange 44 is disposed atan inclination to the longitudinal axis of the piston anddivides the annular recess into two portions 42 and 43. The cam flange, as illustrated in Fig. 5 is formed at its highest portion with a flat portion a and at its lower portion with a flat portion These flat portions a and b are joined by the oppositely disposed inclined portions of the flange. Attached to the wall of the cylinder or barrel 5 is an angular member 15. I have illustrated the wall of the cylinder below the slot 16 as formed with a recess 5al to receive a shank of the angular member 15 and have illustrated the shank of this angular member as being held to the wall by screws 5b. This angular member extends inward into the annular recess in the piston and specically into the space 43 of this recess below the cam 44 and forms a stop against which the shoulder at the outer end of the recess will bear when the piston is being forced inward. As before remarked?, this member 15 forms a stop limiting the outward movement of the piston and for the purpose of limiting the inward movement of the piston and forming the adjustable stop, I provide the abutment 17 which extends into the slot 15 and into the portion 42 of the annular recess, this abutment 17 having a head 17a interiorly screw-threaded for the passage of a rod 18 which, as illustrated, is screw-threaded for a portion of its length. This rod, at one end has a smooth portion 23 whichl has sliding engagement in the end wall 26 of the housing 24 and at its other end the rod is smooth as at 19 and has sliding engagement in the opposite end wall of the housing, preferably passing through a bushing 25 or gland so that the housing may be filled with oil to keep the parts lubricated and to assist in lubricating the piston. The housing has preferably a removable wall 27 whereby access may be had to the interior of the housing, the wall 27 being held to the end walls by means of screws. The smooth portion 19 of the rod 18 extends out through the end wall of the housing and is then angularly bent and is operatively connected as will be later described, to the throttle arm or lever of the engine. Preferably the piston, outward of its inner end, is formed with a piston ring groove 41 and a piston ring 40 resting therein.

The inner end of the piston is recessed, as at 39 so as to leave a solid inwardly projecting portion 38 constituting a valve and controlling entrance through the port 7 and exit through the port 8. From Figs. 2 and 4, it will be seen that the recessed portion comprises a little less than half of the cross sectional area of the piston. The solid portion forming a valve 38 is very nearly or approximately twice thel area of the recessed portion 29, that is, the arc embraced by the solid area is approximately 235, while the arc embraced by the recess is approximately 125. It will be understood that these relative proportions are merely approximations but it will be seen from Figs. 2 and 4 that the solid portion 38 must have a greater angular length than the recessed portion in order that both ports 7 and 8 may be closed at one time.

One of the important features of my invention is to provide means whereby the piston shall not reciprocate when, for instance, the throttle of the carbureter is ntirely closed, but whereby it shall reciprocate for its full stroke if the throttle be fully opened and shall reciprocate a proportionately less amount when the throttle valve is partly open. This is accomplished by operating the rod 18 by means of the connection 22 leading to the throttle arm so as to shift the lug or abutment '17 longi-` tudinally within the slot 16.. Thus, for instance, when the lug 17 is shifted away from the lug 15 a distance equal to the total depth of the cam 44, then it is obvious that the piston will rotate but will not reciprocate, the cam simply traveling around between the two lugs or abutments 15 and 17. On the other hand, it will be obvious that when the abutment 17 is shifted so close to the abutment 15 that the abutments l5 and 17 engage closely on opposite faces of the cam 44, then this cam will act in the manner of a continuous screw thread and the piston will reciprocate for its full stroke, z'. e., the full depth of the cam 44. If, however, the abutment 17 be disposed half way between the first and second-named faces, then as the piston rotates, there will be no movement of the piston outward until the piston is rotated such a distance that the inclined face of the cam contacts with the abutment 17 and then the piston will commence to move downward for the remainder of the depth of the cam and upon a further ratation will move upward the same amount and then will rotate without moving in either direction until it again strikes the abutment 17 By thus shifting the abutment 17, it is obvious that the stroke ofthe piston may be entirely controlled and so that the piston may have no longitudinal movement whatever, a very small longitudinal movement, a half stroke, a three-quarter stroke or a full stroke. In fact, the abutment 17 may be adjusted so as to give the piston any range between a full stroke and no stroke.

The operation of the pump is as follows l rlhe plunger or piston is continuously rotated through the action of the yshaft 30 which is driven from any suitable part of the engine. Assuming that the throttle is Wide open and that, therefore, a full stroke of the piston is desired, then of course, the lug or abutment 17 has been so adjusted as to contact with the inner face of the cam 44. Assuming that the piston has rotated to a position to open the inlet port, then at this time the piston commences to move downward sucking in oil through the chamber 45. When the piston reaches its outermost point, then the flat portion a of the cam is operatively engaging the lugs or abutments 15 and 17 and there is a dwell while the piston rotates to a position which will open the outlet port. As soon as the outlet port is opened, the inclined face of the cam operatively engages the abutments 15 and 17 and the piston commences to move steadily inward, forcing the oil drawn into the chamber 45, out through the pipe 12. When the piston has reached its innermost position, the portion b of the cam is active and the piston rotates without reciprocation until the port 8 has been closed and the port 7 opened. As soon as this occurs the piston not only rotates but moves outward, sucking in oil into the chamber 45. If the abutment 17 is adjusted at its maximum distance from the abutment 15, then the piston does not reciprocate but simply rotates and alternately opens and closes the ports 7 and 8 without either sucking in oil or forcing oil out. As soon, however, as the abutment 17 is shifted so that it will engage any portion of the cam 44, then a corresponding reciprocation of the piston is secured and the pump operates in the manner heretofore described to suck in oil and force it out.

It will be seen that the principle of this pump is such that the pump will feed oil in cooperation with the amount of gas fed to the motor of an internal combustion engine by connecting the movable abutment 17 with the throttle control. A motor running easily on a closed throttle requires little oil. The throttle control so affects the movable abutment as to feed only a small quantity of oil therefor, when the throttle is closed or nearly closed. A motor working under full load with the throttle wide open needs much more oil and thus the movable abutment, connected to the throttle control would be shifted to its minimum distance from the fixed abutment 15 and thus the maximum quantity of oil will be fed. Any motor with an oil pump feeding a certain amount of oil for each revolution of the crank shaft or other moving part of the motorjcan not supply the right amount of oil for all conditions. Thus a motorcycle or automobile moving at a moderate speed up a long steep hill, with its throttle wide open heats rapidly and uses much oil and it is obvious that the feed would not be proper from a pump depending upon the number of revolutions of the motor alone, for determining the amount of oil fed by the pump. With my construction, however, the amount of oil fed does not depend upon the speed of the motor, but upon the work to be done by the motor, as evidenced by the amount of gas required. It is the amount of gas required which is the controlling factor and not the speed of the motor.

It will be seen that the pump which I have devised has very few parts and that there are practically no movable parts except the piston itself and the adjustable abutment. There is thus nothing which would be liable to get out of order and nothing which is not positively actuated. The piston may be readily withdrawn from the barrel or cylinder by removing the abutments 15 and 17 and the parts can be readily assembled.

The lug 15 is rigidly mounted upon the wall of the cylinder 5 and it is against this lug that the cam operates when the piston moves inward against high pressure in the crank case, because the plston when it does move inward to its full extent, bears againstthe lug 15, and any pressure against the outer end of the piston will not affect the amount of oil fed by the pump. The lixed lug 15 therefore limits the inward movement of the piston so that even if the movable lug 17 is shifted away from the fixed lug, pressure on the exterior of the piston will not force it inward beyond a predetermined amount. A piston with this construction cannot slide out of its working position even if there is pressure against the driven end of the piston and the same is true if there is ressure at the valve end of the piston. hus the amount of oil fed by the pump is vpredetermined by the pressure of the movable lug 17 and cannot be affected by what may be termed foreign pressures at either end of the piston.

Having thus described this invention, what is claimed is:

1. ln a pump of the character described, a barrel havin inlet and outlet ports, a rotatable piston gormed to provide a valve controlling the inlet and outlet ports upon a rotation of the piston2 means for constantly rotating the piston 1n one direction, and means for positively shifting the piston longitudinally alternately in opposite directions and adjustably controlling the length of the piston stroke.

2. In a pump of the character described, a barrel, a rotatable piston mounted therein, means for constantly rotating the piston, means for positively shifting the piston longitudinally in opposite directions alternately, and means for adj ustably controlling the length of the stroke of the piston. n'

3. In a pump, a'cylinder having intake and outlet ports, a piston adapted to simultaneously reciprocate and rotate in the c ylinder and formed to provide a valve acting to alternately cover and uncover said ports as the piston is rotated, means for positively reciprocating the piston comprising an annular cam and abutments engaging with opposite faces of the cam, said abutments being carried on the cylinder wall, one of said abutments being shiftable toward or from the other abutment, and means exterior to the cylinder wall whereby the movable abutment may be shifted and operatively engaging the movable abutment.

4. In a pump, a cylinder having intake and outlet ports, a piston adapted to simultaneously reciprocate and rotate in the cylinder, and formed to provide a valve acting to alternately cover and uncover said ports, as the piston is rotated, and means for positively reciprocating the piston comprising an annular cam, and means coacting with the cam. and engaging with the opposite side faces thereof to thereby cause a reciprocation of the piston, said means including two elements relatively shiftable toward or fromxeach other for a distance equal to the depth of the cam.

5. In a pump, a cylinder having intake and outlet ports, a piston adapted to simultaneously reciprocate and rotate in the cylinder and formed to provide a valve adapted to alternately cover and uncover the ports, and means for causing a reciprocation of the piston including a cam carried on the piston and rotatable therewith, and abutments engaging with opposite faces of the cam and carried on the cylinder wall, said abutments being relatively shiftable toward or from each other for a distance equal to the depth of the cam.

6. In a pump, a cylinder, a piston rotating in the cylinder and longitudinally reciprocatable therethrough, and means for reciprocating the piston comprising acam mounted on the piston and disposed in a'plane inclined to the axis of the piston, and abutments projecting inwardly from the cylinder wall and with which said cam engages, one of said abutments being adjustable toward or from the other abutment to thereby control the range of movement of the piston.

7. In a' pump, a c linder, a piston rotatable and reciprocata le therein, and means for reciproatingA the piston including a camv formed upon t e piston and-disposed in a plane inclined to the longitudinal axis there of, a fixed abutment projecting inwardly from the wall of the vcylinder and engaging on one face of the cam, a movable abutment projecting inwardly from the wall of the cylinder and confronting the other face of the cam, and a member engaging said movable abutment, said member being shiftable to shift the movable abutment toward or from the other abutment. l

8. In a pump, a cylinder closed at one end and open at the other end and having an outlet and inlet port, a piston rotatably mounted in the cylinder and reciprocating therein and having its inner end formed to provide a valve controlling said ports,V a driving shaft having rotative engagement withv the piston and sliding engagement therewith and means for positively reciprocating the piston comprising a cam formed upon the piston and disposed in a plane inclined to the longitudinal axis thereof, a fixed abutment projecting inwardly from the cylinder wall and confronting one face of the cam, and an abutment projecting inwardly from the cylinder wall and confronting the other face ofthe cam. .A

9. In a pump, a cylinder closed at one end and open at the other end and having an outlet and an inlet port, a piston rotatably mounted in the cylinder and reciprocating, therein and having its inner end formed to provide a valve controlling said ports, a driving shaft having rotative engagement with the piston and sliding engagement therewith, means for positively reciprocating the lpiston comprising a cam formed upon the piston and disposed in a plane inclined to the longitudinal .axis thereof, a fixed abutment projecting inward from the cylinder wall and confronting one face ofthe cam, and an abutment projecting inward from the cylinder wall and confronting the other face .0f the cam, said last named 4abutment being shiftable toward or from the iixed abutment, and means operativel engaging the movable abutment where y it may be shifted.

10. A pump comprising a cylinder, detachably closed at one end and having at this end oppositely disposed inlet andoutlet ports, the other end of the cylinder being open andk the cylinder being longitudinally slotted intermediate its ends, a solid piston rotatively and reciprocatably mounted within the cylinder and having its inner end re-V cessed transversely to provide a valve adapted, as the piston is rotated, to alternately close and open the inlet and outlet ports, the piston intermediate its ends being formed with an annular recess and with a cam flange extending outward from the bottom -of' the recess, the cam flangebeing disposed in a plane at an angle to the longitudinal axis of the piston, the opposite ends of said cam being disposed at a right angle to the axis 130 K In testimony whereof heunzo affix my slgnatum 1n the presence of two' Wl'nesss.

RAYMN J.,

Witnesses:

JOSEPH F. BOPPEL FRED. J, BIHQITHMJMa

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2451390 *Aug 22, 1946Oct 12, 1948Euclid Production Dev CorpHydraulic jack
US2517645 *Jul 11, 1947Aug 8, 1950Nathan Mfg CoPumping mechanism
US3120811 *Jan 29, 1962Feb 11, 1964Thunderbird Engineering CoFluid injector pump
US3994632 *Jan 8, 1975Nov 30, 1976Schreiber Ralph ERotary engine and pump
US4392787 *Jan 21, 1981Jul 12, 1983Wetrok Inc.Diaphragm pump
US4764093 *Apr 27, 1987Aug 16, 1988Kioritz CorporationOil pump for chain saw
US5741126 *Mar 1, 1996Apr 21, 1998Stearns; Stanley D.Valveless metering pump with crisscrossed passage ways in the piston
US7887308Aug 12, 2005Feb 15, 2011Swissinnov Product SarlVolumetric pump with reciprocated and rotated piston
US8172799Oct 23, 2007May 8, 2012Acist Medical Systems, Inc.Volumetric pump
US9140247 *Aug 2, 2010Sep 22, 2015Durr Systems GmbhRotary piston pump for metering a coating agent
US9222470 *Mar 15, 2011Dec 29, 2015Sensile Pat AgMicropump
US9511186Mar 13, 2013Dec 6, 2016Acist Medical Systems, Inc.Medical injection systems and pumps
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US20090053086 *Aug 12, 2005Feb 26, 2009Thierry NavarroVolumetric pump with reciprocated and rotated piston
US20100260634 *Jun 24, 2010Oct 14, 2010Thierry NavarroVolumetric Pump With Reciprocated and Rotated Piston
US20120186518 *Aug 2, 2010Jul 26, 2012Frank HerreRotary piston pump for metering a coating agent
US20130017099 *Mar 15, 2011Jan 17, 2013Sensile Pat AgMicropump
CN100582481CAug 12, 2005Jan 20, 2010蒂埃里那瓦罗Volumetric pump with reciprocated and rotary piston
WO2006056828A1 *Aug 12, 2005Jun 1, 2006Thierry NavarroVolumetric pump with reciprocated and rotated piston
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/500, 92/13
Cooperative ClassificationF04B7/06