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Publication numberUS1242002 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 2, 1917
Filing dateFeb 15, 1917
Priority dateFeb 15, 1917
Publication numberUS 1242002 A, US 1242002A, US-A-1242002, US1242002 A, US1242002A
InventorsAlbert H. Lewis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game.
US 1242002 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. H. LEWIS.

GAML APPLICATION FIL`ED FEB. l5, 1911.

Patented Oct. 2, 1917.

ALBERT H. LEWIS, OF LOS-AEGELES, CALIFORNIA.

GAME.

Application filed February 15, 1917.

To all whom it may concern.'

Be it known that I, ALBERT H. LEWIS, a citizen of the United States, residing at LosAngeles, in the county of Los Angeles and State of California, have invented new and useful Improvements in Games, of which the following is a specification. y

It is an object of this invention to provide a game which will hold the attention of and amuse the players, require the eXercise of their mathematical skill, and is suggestive of the savings habit.

The invention resides primarily in a board having a group of columns consisting of spaces representing savings ofvarious denominations of money and a deposit space; with the board, dice are used to rindicate by throws the amounts saved,such

amounts being indicated on the rows ofv markers.

An embodiment of my invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure l is a plan view of the game-board.

Fig. 2 shows a dice box and dice to be used in playing the game, and

Fig. 3 markers which are used upon the board.

A indicates a board made of card-board,

or other suitablematerial, which may be divided through the center so that it maybe folded for the convenience of storing.

-Upon the board are four players` elds, B,

C, D, and E, which may be distinguished by coloring each field differently. Such color ing will also increasethe attractiveness of the board. Each field is identical in its markings, and one only will be described, as this will suffice to illustrate the marking on the other fields.

Extending diagonally across the field C is a column F of spaces or rectangles indicating cents. Extending along one edge of the field is a column Gr indicating dimes, and along another edge intersecting G and F at the center of the board, is a column H indicating nickels. A triangular space J at the inner corner of the field C forms one fourth part of a square, the other portions being similar triangles in the other fields.

The space J is marked $5.00 saved. The adjacent space on the nickel column is marked Bank The space on the dime column adjacent to the triangle J is also marked Bank The column F has markings from one to nine cents. The 8 cent i Specication of Letters Patent.

Patented Oct. 2, 1917. serial 110.148,728. I,

space is marked Spent, while the other spaces in the row are marked Saved In the nickel row, indicated by H, the five cent space i-s marked fSpent, while the remaining spaces are marked Saved All the spaces in the ten cent row are marked Saved The five cent space and the eight cent space may conveniently be indicated by coloring the spaces differently from the other spaces in the row.

Each player should be provided with a set of markers. The set will include one marker designating one cent, 5 markers each designating a nickel, and marked five cents, and 5 each designating a dime marked l0 cents. The l1 markers of each set are 'loV4 preferably differently colored to distinguish the sets. A marker o f each denomination is shown in Fig. 3.

Two dice of the usual type and having markers from 1 to 6 constitute a necessary part of the game. As the dice are to be thrown, it i-s convenient to use a dice box.

The board shown is intended to accommodate vfour players7 but a less number may play if desired. For convenience, each player should be provided with two dice and a dice box. Each player is entitled to two throws of the dice in turn. The spots on each dice face up added together indicate the number of cents saved and must first be applied toward saving the nickels. In starting the game if a player makes a throw which amounts to less than 10 cents, only the amount over 5 cents or a nickel maybe marked up in the cents columnY as saved.

The first nickel is spent and does not count.

' amount inv the cents column are forfeited if a throw is made which, added to any cents marked up in the cents column, makes an even eight cents. Thus, if there are three cents marked up in the centsl column and ve is thrown with the dice, this will make eight. The markers are then removed from both the cents column and the nickel column, both other nickel in the nickel column before moving the preceding one into the bank, if his throw is sufficient to allow it. If the player starts the second nickel and then makes a Jthrow so that he stops upon the eight cent space in the cents column, he will forfeit both the markers in the nickel column losing all he has saved.

IVhen a throw produces an amount which is to be added to the cents column, the result being equal to or greater than five, five cents is added in the nickel column and the surplus marked up in the cents column.

After all the nickels have been deposited in the bank, the dimes are saved. The dimes are also subject to forfeiture or being spent when the cent marker stops at ei ht cents. 'Ihe play with the dimes is similar to that with the nickels, but there is no first dime spent The player who succeeds first in saving $5.00 wins the game.

The game may be played by usin only one players field. The markers o each player being of different colors, the same columns may be used. The columns may also be arranged differently than that shown in the players field. It is merely essential that there be a bank deposit space and columns one for each denomination of money saved. A further variation of the invention, and which is included Within the scope of the claims, is that ofk a device equivalent to the dice. Any device which may be manually actuated and which will by chance indicate a number may be used instead of' the dice.

What I claim is: y l. In a game, a board provided With the representation of a group of columns and a deposit space, each column being divided and having indicia to indicate the divisions, said indicia increasing in arithmetical progression from one end of the column to the other, the difference in each column being that of a denomination of money; a plurality of sets of markers, each set comprising markers provided with indicia to represent the several denominations of money indicated on the columns; and means having indicia marked thereon in units of the lowest of said denominations, said means being manually actuable to indicate by chance numbers.

2. In a game, a board provided with a representation of columns radiating from a deposit space, each column being divided into spaces marked with indicia decreasing in arithmetical progression from the deposit space, the diierence in each column being that of a denomination of money; a plurality of sets of markers, each set comprising markers provided with indicia to represent the several denominations of money indicated on the-spaces; and means having indicia marked thereon in units of the lowest of said denominations, said means being manually actuable to indicate by chance numbers.

3. In a game, a board provided with a l representation of a deposit space, sets of three columns radiating therefrom, one column having spaces therein marked with indicia decreasing in differences of one cent from the deposit space, the second row having spaces therein marked with indicia decreasing in differences of a nickel from the deposit space and the third column having spaces marked with indicia decreasing in differences of a dime from the deposit space; a plurality of sets of markers comprising one marked a cent, another marked a nickel and a third marked a dime; and means including a die to indicate by chance numbers in units of one cent.

In witness that I claim the foregoing I have hereunto subscribed my name this 3rd day of February, 1917.

ALBERT H. LEWIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4521197 *Apr 24, 1984Jun 4, 1985Lumpkins Rebecca GMoney calculation game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/256
International ClassificationH01H29/28, C25B9/04, H01H33/00, H01H29/18
Cooperative ClassificationH01H29/18, H01H29/28, C25B9/045, H01H33/002
European ClassificationH01H29/28, H01H29/18, H01H33/00B, C25B9/04B