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Publication numberUS1243287 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 16, 1917
Filing dateNov 29, 1916
Priority dateNov 29, 1916
Publication numberUS 1243287 A, US 1243287A, US-A-1243287, US1243287 A, US1243287A
InventorsHarry J Haigh
Original AssigneeHarry J Haigh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy.
US 1243287 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. J. HAIGH.

TOY. APPLICATION FILED NOVy 29. 1916. 'L2/8&8? v Patente@ @en N1 im?.

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HARRY J'. HAIGH, OF STAPLETON, NEW YORK.

Specification of Letters Patent. Eaftenijed 0G13., 1 6, 191. 7.

Application led November 29, 1916. Serial No. 134,106.

l" To all who'miz' may concern.'

V j `Be it known that I, HARRY J. HAIGH, a citizen of the United States, residing at Stapleton, Staten Island, 'borough and county of Richmond, and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Toys, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to improvements in figure toys, and more particularly to toy boats, toy aquatic animals, and the like.

One object of the invention is the provision of simple means for propelling toy objects either upon or beneath the surface of a body of water.

Another important object of the invention is the provision of means for readily and rapidly submerging the toy and bringing it to the surface.

A further object of the invention is the provision of simple propelling and submerging devices adaptedlto be simultaneously or l independently controlled.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a vertical longitudinal section of a toy submarine ves. sel embodyingr the invention, the vessel being shown submerged;

Fig. 2 a top plan view of the vessel;

Fig. 3 a side elevation, lpartly in vertical section, showing the vesselfloating on the surface of a body of water;

Fig. 4 a detail perspective view of the de. vice for displacing the water in the hull to raise the vessel; y

Fig. 5 a detail view of the .propelling means; and

Fig. 6 a detail sectional view of an air pump adapted for connection to the outer ends of the air hose to supply'lair to the propelling and raising means.

Referring, by reference numerals, to the various parts of the embodiment of the invention shown in the drawings, 8 designates the hull of a toy submarine vessel provided with a weighted keel 9 and a pair of horizontal stabilizing fins 10. The vessel is formedwith a superstructure 11 upon which a periscope 12 is mounted. The upper end of the periscope 12 is preferably provided with an enlarged buoyant portion or float 13 of any suitable form.

The vessel is provided with a .water ballast chamber 15 within the hull 8, and said chamber is connected with the exterior of the hull 8 by a series of passages or conduits 1 through whichl water is normally adapted Ato flow into the ballast chamber to submerge If desired, however, the ballast the vessel. chamber 15 maybe omitted and water admitted into the interior of Athe hullA 8 through the openings 1. bers 6 and 6a are provided at the bow and stern of the vessel between the end walls `of the ballast chamber l5 and the adjacent ends of the hull 8. Y

A propeller shaft 16 is j ournaled in a bearing sleeve 17 extending through the hull 8 at the stern of the vessel. A screw or other. suitable propeller 5 is mounted on the outer end of the shaft 16 to rotate therewith, and a rotary impact fluid motor 4 is mounted on the inner end of theshaft to drive the pro-l peller 5. rIhe motor 4 is housed 'in the aft air chamber 6.v Motion is imparted to the motor by. an air blast from the discharge end 321 of-an air pipe or'hose 3, one end of which extends into the chamber 6 and is secured in position to deliver a jet of air against the buckets or blades of the motor .4. The hose or flexible air pipe 3 is provided with a compressible bulb air pump 19, adapted to be held in the hand -ofA an operative and alternately compressed and released to deliver jets of air through the air pipe. The hose is made of suiiicient vlength to enable jets of air to be conveniently delivered against the motor when the vessel is iioating on the surface or submerged. A vent pipe 3c is attached to or formed integrally with the air pipe 3. The-inner end of the vent pipe terminates within the chamber 6, and its outer end terminates adjacent the outer end of the pipe 3. This vent pipe serves as Closed air chain-l an exhaust outlet for the air blown into the chamber 6 to drive the motor 4.

An inflatable air bag 7 is provided within the ballast chamber 15, and a flexible air pipe or hose 2 is connected at its inner end with the mouth of the air bag 7. The outer end of the hose 2 is provided with a compressible bulb 19 similar to the bulb 19 of the hose 3. By pumping air into the bag through the pipe 2 to inflate the bag, the water in the chamber 15 may be displaced and forced out through the openings or conduits 1, and the vessel thus caused to rise to the surface.

Any suitablejform of air-forcing means may be connected to the 'ends of the air pipes 2 and 3, but I prefer to employ the simple form of air pump shown in the drawings, comprising exible rubber bulbs 2 for. inflating the air bag, also serves as a adapted to be attached to the outer ends of the pipes 2 and 3 by any suitable form of coupling.l The intake end .18 of each bulb pump 19 is provided with a valve casing 20 containing a freely movable ball valve 21.

bulb 1s held in the hand with the inlet end 18 lowermost, and' alternately compressed and released, air will be taken in through the check .valve and forced outwardly through the outlet end 24- and its connected air hose.

rlhe valved pump attached to the air hose means for maintaining any desired degree of inflation of th'e bag 7, and consequently maintaining the toy at various depths below the surface. It is obvious that no air can escape from the bag as long as the bulb is held with the end 18' lowermost so that the ball 21 closes the opening 22.

The pump attached to air hose 3 will deliver successive jets of air against the bucket wheel 4.

The air chambers 6 a-nd 6a, and the buoyant portion 13 carried by the periscope 12, serve to limit the-depth of the submergence of the vessel. The parts are preferably constructed so that the vessel will oat in submerged condition with the upper end 13 of the periscope projecting slightly above the surface, as shown in Fig. 1.

From the foregoing it will beobserved that a ligure toy adapted to float upon a body of liquid has been provided having simple means for causing the toy to submerge, or lioat upon the surface.

An important feature of the invention is the provision of means for limiting the depth xof submergence of thetoy. Another important feature is the provision of means for maintaining the toy on the surface or at various levels beneath the surface.

A further feature of importance is the provision of means for propelling the toy either upon or beneath the surface. It will be seen also that simple means has been provided for operating the propelling and raising means either simultaneously or independently, and for controlling the boat awhile on the surface or submerged.

While I vhave illustrated and described the invention as embodied ina toy submarine vessel, it will be obvious that the invention may be embodied in many other forms of figure. toys, such as various aquatic animals, and other objects.

What I claim is:

1. In a figure toy, the 'combination of a body portion adapted to float on a body of water, means for normally admitting water Within said body portion to submerge the same, an inflatable air bag in said body p'ortion, an air hose connected with said bag and extending outwardly through a wall of the body portion, a pump connected to the outer end of said hose for inliating the air bag, and manually operable means for controlling the exhaust of air from said bag through said air hose to the atmosphere.y

' 2. In a' ligure toy, the combination yof a body portion adapted to lioat 'on a body of water, means for normally admitting water within said body portion, an inflatable air bag in said body portion, an air hose connected with said bag and extending outwardly through a wall of the body portion,

a compressible bulb air pump having its discharge end connected with the Vouter end of said hose, and a gravity check valve in the intake of said pump, said valve being operable by tilting the bulb pump to maintain the bag lin an inflated condition and `to permit air toexhaust from said bag.

3. In a ligure toy, the combination of a hollow body portion adapted to float on a body of water, means for normally admitting water within said. body portion to sub# merge the same, an inflatable air bag with'- in thebody pcrtion adapted to displace the Water therefrom when inflated, a yflexible conduit connected at its inner end with the air bag and extending outwardly through the body portion, a manually operable pump for inflating said air bag connected with the outer end of said conduit, a manually operable-valve in the intake of said pump for controlling the exhaust of air from said bag to the atmosphere, an upf

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2476678 *Jan 14, 1947Jul 19, 1949Miller Walter CInflatable toy airplane
US2506281 *Jun 4, 1946May 2, 1950Frederick SabiniSelf-propelled toy submarine
US2749658 *Nov 2, 1951Jun 12, 1956Neumann Albert WToy submarine
US2903822 *Jul 8, 1955Sep 15, 1959Reid Donald VRadio controlled model submarine
US2987848 *Jul 2, 1959Jun 13, 1961Daniel RadomskiToy aeroplane
US3010251 *Apr 1, 1960Nov 28, 1961Derdowski Richard NToy submarine
US3193967 *Jun 20, 1962Jul 13, 1965Jan OkonskiToy boat propulsion means
US6926577 *May 24, 2003Aug 9, 2005Thorne, Iii EdwinUnderwater device and method of play
US8033890Oct 11, 2011Warner Jon ASelf-propelled hydrodynamic underwater toy
US20040235387 *May 24, 2003Nov 25, 2004Edwin ThorneUnderwater device and method of play
US20070123139 *May 17, 2006May 31, 2007Warner Jon ASelf-propelled hydrodynamic underwater toy
WO2006125127A2 *May 18, 2006Nov 23, 2006Jon Anthony WarnerSelf-propelled hydrodynamic underwater toy
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/161
Cooperative ClassificationA63H23/02