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Publication numberUS1248825 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 4, 1917
Filing dateApr 8, 1915
Priority dateApr 8, 1915
Publication numberUS 1248825 A, US 1248825A, US-A-1248825, US1248825 A, US1248825A
InventorsCarleton Dederer
Original AssigneeCarleton Dederer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical needle.
US 1248825 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. DEDERER. SURGICAL NEEDLE APPLICATION FILED APR. 8. i915- 415 INVENTUR Patented m. 4,1917.

Cameron Di pense, or Los ANGELLES, catrronivra.

SURGICAL NEEDLE.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known thatll, CAnLn'roN Dnonunn, surgeon, a itizen of the United States, residing at LosAngeles, in the county of Los Angeles and State of California, have invented new and useful Improvements in Surgical Needles, of which the following is a specification. y

This invention relates to surgical needles, and more particularly to curved surgical needles for use in diflicult surgical operations, particularly in placesinaccessible to needles as ordinarily constructed, unless such needles are manipulated by means of forceps, holders, handles, or the like; a needle manipulated by such forceps, handles, or other like'means, cannever be as satisfactorily employed as when held directly by the fingers of a surgeon, as the sense of touch through the fingers is lacking while the needle is forced or drawn through the muscles, tissues, or the like, of the patient; furthermore, the leverage provided by holders of any sort may cause the needle to penetrate too deeply and accidentally pierce important blood vessels or tissues. i

This invention has for its object to provide an improved surgical needle which will be adapted to be passed through muscles or other tissues, for the purpose of drawing after such needle the sutures used in such sewing, and which may be. manipulated by the fingers of the operator in places difficult of access, as, for instance, in hernia operations, where the low-est stitch is particularly diflicult to make with needles as ordinarily constructed; this object is attained by the provision of a needle so curved that the eye end of the same may be grasped by the fingers in a plane other than that in which the point is being moved as such point is forced through the tissues to be sewed: 'it follows from such curved formation of the needle that after the curved point has emerged far enough to afford a good finger hold, the eye end of the needle, threaded with the suture, may be drawn by the fingers through the hole pierced by the point, by manipulating and moving the pointed end in a plane which will be other than that of the pierced hole which determines and forms the path for the eye end of the needle.

Other objects will appear from the following description, among which objects are specification 01" Letters Patent.

the provision of needles with improved point formations and cutting edges, and needles of relative simplicity and inexpensiveness of construction, when their other features of superiority with respect to utility and serviceability are considered.

With the above and other objects in view the invention consists in the novel and use- Patented Dec. a, lei v. Application filed April s, 1915. Serial No. 19,932.

ful provision, formation, construction and interrelation of parts and features all as hereinafter described, shown in the drawingand, finally pointed out in claims.

in the drawing:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a field of surgical operation showing a needle constructed in accordance with the invention and illustrating the method of using the same; Q

F 2 is a view of the needle shown in Fig. 1, looking at the eye end of the needle and one side of the point, the view being upon an enlarged scale;

3 is a view of the needle looking at the point of the same and the edge of the eyethe figure being taken on a line of vision at right angles to the showing of Fig. 2 and looking in the direction of the arrow Fig. 3

near Fig. 2;

, Fig. 4 is a view of the needle looking. in

the direction of the arrow Fig. l near Fig; 2; Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 3 of modified form of needle; I i

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Figs. 3 and 5 off a still further modified form of needle;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the point of the form of needle illustrated in Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 4:. the showing being on a still further enlarged scale;

Fig. 8 is a side view, on an enlarged scale of the preferred form of eye formation;

Fig. 9 is a view taken at right angles to the showing in Fig. 8 and looking in the direction of the arrow near Fig. 8;

Fig. 10 is a sectional view taken uponthe line se -90 Fig. 4, and looking in the directlon of the appended arrows;

Fig. 11 1s a sectional view taken upon the line c0 -w Fig. 4, and looking in the di- 8, 9, 10 and 11, in Figs. 5 and 12, and in Figs. 6 and 13, are designatedby the same reference characters.

Referring with particularity to the drawing in Figs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11, the surgical needle is designated by A, the field of the surgical operation being designated by B in Fig. 11, where a and b designate sections of a muscle to be sewed together, the needle A being shown in one of the positions it assumes in passing through the respective; sections a and Z). The body of theneedle preferably consists of a single length of metallic wire 14; provided at one end with an eye 15 and provided at the other end with a penetrating point 16 the wire being bent-between its extreme ends and formed into two arcuate portions 17 and 18 joined midway between the ends of the needle, the planes of these arcs being preferably at right angles to each other as will be clearly understood by comparing Figs. 2, 3 and 4. The arcuate portions 1 and 18are preferably quadrants of a circle, the arcuate portionl'? terminating at one end of the needle in the point 16 and the arcuate portion 18 terminating at the other end of the needle in the eye formation 15.

slightly greater width than the main circular body portion of the needle, at at 18*, and the immediately adjacent portion of the body .is spread or flattened out, as at 18 to project beyond-the main needle body at both sides thereof at right angles to the spread portion 18*. The eye 15 is located,

' 1n the main, in the flattened or spread por tion 18", but extends in part into the spread portion 18, so that the portion 18 acts as a spreader to facilitate the entrance of the suture, shown at 19, into the hole pierced by the needle.

The formation of the needle end'just described will be clearly understood by reference to Figs. 8 and'9. In the modified form of construction shown in Figs. 5 and 12, designates the needle, the body of which consists of a length of rectangular wire 20, formed into two arcuate portions 21 .and 22 which-join midway between the ends of the needle, each of such arcuate portions 21 and 22 being preferably a quadrant of a circle and lying in a plane at right angles to each other. The terminus 21 of the arcuate portion 21 is formed into a penetrating point and the terminus 22" of the arcuate portion 22 is rounded olf and provided with an eye through which a suture 23 may be threaded.

In the modified form of construction shown in Figs. 6 and 13, D designates the needle, the body of which consists of a length of wire 24: formed into two arcuate portions 25 and 26, joined midway between the ends of the needle. The terminus 25 7 of the arcuate portion 25 is formed into a point, and the terminus 26 of the arcuate portion 26 is widened or spread as at- 26 and the immediately adjacent portion of the body is spread as at 26 and projects beyond the main needle body at right angles to the widened portion 26, an eye 27 being provided, in the main, in the spread portion 26*, though lying in part in the spread portion 26. This end formation is similar to that described in connection with the needle A. and the object of this formation of parts about the eye is to facilitate the drawing of a suture 27 into the hole pierced by the needle. The arcuate portion 25 of the needle D is of triangular cross-section and the point is formed by cutting away material from the sides 28 and 29 of the triangular wire, so as to form the extreme point on that side 30 of the wire which forms the inner surface of the arcuate portion 25. The arcuate portion 26 is preferably of circular cross-section except at the hereinabove described terminus 26, where the eye is provided. The triangular and circular arcuate portions 25 and 26 gradually merge into each other at the point of junction 24$, midway between the ends of the needle.

The operation, method of use and advantages of the improved surgical needle will be readily understood from the foregoing description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings and the following statement:

The form of needle shown in Figs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10 and 11 being provided with a point having the figure of a quarter portion of an ellipsoid as hereinbefore described, may be advantageously employed in certain. operations where important blood vessels lie immediately beneath the tissues to be penetrated by the needle, the cutting edge 16' of the ellipsodial point bounding the flat surface 16 being easily guided in cutting under or through the tissues, the curved portion of such ellipsodial formation rea dily riding over the blood vessel which it is desired to avoid. The arcuate portion 18 of the needle is held by the fingers of the operator as the point is being entered into the tissues, such are uate portion 18 being in a plane other than the arcuate portion l7 with the'point 16, a good finger hold is afforded the operator and a twisting movement may be given the arcuate portion 18 "to urge the point through the tissues. Wheirthe point has emerged sufliciently to be iinqthe clear where it will afford a firm finger hold the arcuate portion 18 will have entered the tissues and the operator may by taking hold at the pointed end of as much of the arcuate portionas is in the clear, draw the arcuate portion 18 provided with the eye through the tissues drawing there-through the suture 19.

The form of needle shown in Figs. 5 and 12 of rectangular cross-section is used in a manner similar to that just described in connection with the ellipsoidally pointed needle, though the form of the needle and its penetrating point 21 fit it for other classes of work. In using the needle being described the point 21 of the arcuate portion 21 is urged into the tissues by manipulating with the fingers the arcuate portion 22 which affords a good hold in a plane other than that in which the hole is being pierced by the point and after the point has passed through the tissues and emerged sufficiently the operator may, by taking hold of such portion of the arcuate portion 21 as is in the clear and by manipulating such portion 21, draw the arcuate portion 22 and the terminus 22 provided with the eye 15, carrying the suture 13, through the hole previously pierced by the point 21 The form of needle shown in Figs. 6 and 13 being of triangular formation at the pointed end 25" of the arcuate portion 25, is especially adapted for certain classes of work,- as the sharp penetrating point and the cutting edges of the arcuate portion 25 resulting from the triangular cross-sectional formation render it peculiarly useful in certain operations. In the use of this form of needle the arcuate portion 26 aflords a good finger hold for the operator while the point is being urged into the tissues in a plane other than that in which the arcuate portion 26 lies. After the point has been forced through the tissues and the major part of the arcuate portion 25 has emerged from the tissues, the operator may secure a firm hold on the arcuate portion 25 and draw the arcuate portion 26 with its eye 27 threaded with a suture 27 through the hole previously pierced by the point and enlarged by the arcuate portion 25.

In all of the forms of construction shown, the same general mode of use is employed, namely, the point is caused to enter by manipulating with a twisting or partially rotatory movement the eye-bearing portion of the respective needle, and after the point and the forward arcuate portion hearing such point has been so forced through the tissue sections to be united, such forward arcuate portion serves as a grip for the fingers of the operator by means of which the remaining portion of the needle may be drawn through the hole previously pierced by the point to draw therethrough the sutureused to bind the tissue or muscle sections together.

his due to the fact that the needle has a compound curvature that the diiiicult stitch illustrated in Fig. 1 may be made, without the use of the objectionable before mentioned forceps orhandles by a needle constructed in accordance with this invention, as such compound curvature allows a portion of the needle to be held by the operator in the clear, and such portion manipulated by the operator is first the eye-bearing arcuate portion and later the pointbearing forward arcuate portion of the needle as hereinbefore described.

The curvature of the needle throughout its entire length, renders it susceptible of manipulation by the fingers, as an excellent grip or finger hold may be had at any portion of its length.

It is manifest that many variations may be made with respect to the disclosure and the foregoing description and drawing, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Having thus disclosed my invention I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent:

1. A needle having a portion curved in one plane and provided in the end thereof with an eye, such curved portion affording a pushing hold for the needle, another portion of said needle having a pointed end and being curved in a plane at an angle to said first named plane and affording a pulling hold for said needle.

2. A needle having a curved portion one end of which is provided with an eye, and a curved piercing end lying in a plane at an angle to the plane of said first named portion.

3. A needle having curves in two distinctly difi'erent planes, one end of said needle being provided with an eye, and the other end thereof with a piercing point.

i. A needle having an arcuate portion provided with a piercing end and an arcuate portion lying in another plane and provided with an eye.

5. A needle having an arcuate portion terminating in a piercing end, and an arcuate portion lying in a plane at right angles to the plane of said first named arcuate portion and provided with an eye.

6. A curved needle, the piercing end of which terminates in a quarter segment of an ellipsoid.

7. A needle having curves in two distinctly different planes, one end of said needle being provided with an eye, and the other end ment of an ellipsoid.

8. A needle having a curved portion in 5 one'plane provided in the end thereof with an eye, such curved portion affording a V pushing hold for the needle, said needle having another portion curved in a plane at an angle tosaid first named plane and afford- 10 ing a pulling hold for said needle; said last named portion terminationg in a quarter segment of an ellipsoid.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing Witnesses.

CARLETON DEDERER.

Witnesses:-

JoHN D. DAWSON, C. E. Homomn,

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents,

v 'Washington, D. C.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification606/225
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/06004