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Publication numberUS1252011 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 1, 1918
Filing dateApr 5, 1916
Priority dateApr 5, 1916
Publication numberUS 1252011 A, US 1252011A, US-A-1252011, US1252011 A, US1252011A
InventorsArthur H Maynard
Original AssigneeBoston Wire Stitcher Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wire-stitching machine.
US 1252011 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

V A. H. MAYNARD. WIRE STIIZCHING' MACHINE}. APPLICATION. fILED APR. 5. ms.

Patented Jan. 1,1918;

5 anus-sum 1.

A. H. MAYNARII.

WIRE STITCHING MACHINE.

APPLICATION men APILS. I916.

Patented Jan. ,1, 1918- 5 BHEETFBEBETI- 9 M. f-? j" IQMENTQ /4/5 A. H. MAYNARD. wms'smcnmka MACHINE.

APPLICATION Ill- ED APR- 5" I915- i I 1,252,011. i Patented Jan. 1,19181 Patented J .1, 1918..

iSKEETS-BHEBT 4 I lm/smo Y yfi'z a ATTORNEY A. H. MAYNARD. WIRE SIITCHING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED APR-.5. I9I5.

. Patented Jan. 1,1918.

W2," ATTORNEY UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

ARTHUR H. MAYNARD, F WARWICK, RHODE ISLAND, ASSIGNOR TO BOSTON WIRE STITCHER COMPANY, OF vAUGUSTA, MAINE, A CORPORATION OF MAINE.

wmn-srrrcnnve MACHINE.

Specification of Letters Itatent.

Patented Jan. 1, 1918.

Application filed April 5, 1916. S erial'No. 89,205. i

To all whom it may concern Be it" known-that I, ARTHUR H. MAYNARD, a citizen of the United States, residing at Warwick, inthe county of Kent, State of Rhode Island, having invented certain new and useful Improvements in Wire-Stitching Machines, of which the following is a specification.

portion of the machine showin ban in My invention relates to wire-stitching or stapling machines for automaticall formin staples from a continuous length 0 wire an inserting them in place to secure to ether overlapping thicknesses of paper, car board 7 The invention consists or other' material.

articularly in an improved means for ad- Justing the stitching-mechanism in relation lation of its action in accordance with the thickness of the work; besides providing for the simultaneous adjustmentand regulationof a series of stitching-heads employed in multiple on a gang machine. Certain other improvements in the construction and method of operation of the stitching-mechanism are also embodied in the invention and Will be explained hereinafter.

The manner and means for carrying out the im 'rovements are fully described in the following specification, illustrated by the accompanying drawings, in which like reference characters designate like parts, In the drawings Figure 1 is a side elevation of a wirestitching or stapling machine embodying the present 1mprove1nent;

Fig. 2, an enlarged, side view of the upper the overarm,'which supports t e stitcherhea 1111011 itudinal section to illustrate therelationo the stichin mechanism to the driving-means, and also s owing the relation. of the stitching-devices to the staple'rclenching mechanism ig. 3, a front view ofthe stitcher-head or bonnet which carries the staple-forming and driving mechanisms;

Fig. 4, a side view of the same, part sectional on the line 44 of Fig. 3, to show the method of attachingthe bonnet to the front of-the stitcher-arm;

Fig. 5, a front elevation of the stitcherhead supporting-means and driving-connections shown in connection with the stapleclenching means;

Fig. 6,.a plan view of the supportingmeans and driving-connections for the stitcher-head; and

Fig. 7, a detail view of; the manually-operable means for adjusting the bearing or quill Q, for the drive-shaft M;

Fig. 8, a detail view of the arran ement for locking the driverbarD and ben er-bar H together; a v

Fig. 9, a perspective view of the stapleforming anvil 0 showing a severed length of wire held therein;

' Fig. 10, a detail view of the connection between the reciprocating slide S and the rotary hub U wh ch operates the anvil 0;

Fig. 11, a side view of the cam-plate V which operates the wire cutters V, V' and Q Fig. 12, a front view of the same showing the connection between the cam-plate and the cutters.

Referring first to Fig. 1, I have preferred to illustrate my. invention as applied to a machine of usual type such 8. S'1S now generally known and used in various art's. As

here shown the main machine is constructed with a base or pedestal P surmounted by a C-shaped frame P having an upper, horizontal arm A,'on' the forward end of which is mounted the stitcher-headsor bonnets'B.

Hinged to the rear armof the frame P" is a B. Pre erably, the portion T of the worktable is pivoted on the forward, upright column 1? of the frame P so that it maybe adjusted with its side t, t inclined to the horizontal, as shown'b the dotted lines, to I adapt the machine 7 or saddle-stitching 0.

Whenlfthe work-support. T isemployed m thisrnanner. the rear shelf T is lowered out.- of the way-"as also shown by the dotted lines j op'eration' andtherefore only one will be desides 71,16 formed with rearwaltd'ly projecting base, as shown particu-w The rear wall of the to fit against the front face of the ing forwardly from thcblock E QPBDIIIQ' b is a stud c flatted off on its upa foot-treadle in the usual manner.

larly in Fig. 4.

Extending through the horizontal arm A at the top of the frame P is the main driveshaft M for the machine, see Fig. 2, carrying a belt-pulley M at its rearward end. Preferably the pulley M is connected with the shaft M by means of a suitable clutch-device, not here shown, which may be operated from At its forward end the arm A is formed with a vertical plate or flange a to which is bolted an upright frame F constructed with a horizontally-extending rail R projecting some distance at either a sup ort for the stitcher-heads or bonnets B and is adapted for attaching a plurality of these on its front face to provide a multiple or gang machine. For certain varieties of work the supporting rail R is sometimes mounted on the frame of a printing-press, folder, hinder or other type of machine, to adapt the stitching-mechanisms of-the heads to operate in conjunction with the operation of printing, folding or binding the leaves of booklets, pamphlets or the like. That is to say, my improved mechanism, although being herein shown and described in connection with a stitching-machine complete in itself, is also adaptable for use with other mechanism forvarious classes of work.

Referring to Fig. 5, the frame F as here shown comprises two spaced uprights f, f

and the lower, horizontal rail R, in the rront face of .which is formed a longitudinal- -slot r. Fitted to slide in the T-slot r are blocks E, E which serve as clamping-means for securing the honuets B in place, one block beingprovidcdfor each head used.

While I have here illustrated two of the blocks E in place, it will be suflicient to describe the conneetions for one head onlyas the arrangement and construction of all of them is identical. Likewise, the complete staple-forming and driving mechanisms contained withinthe boilnets B are all the same in construction andliave the same method of scribed, it being understood that as many individual heads as required may be used on one machine in accordance with the character of the work to be performed. I

Referring to Figs. 2., 3 and 4, the stitcherheads or bonuets B consist of narrow, trough-like casing or boxes having parallel portions at their lower portion of each bonnet B- isadapfed ing-rail R andjis providedlwith-an o ening. b located opposite the slot 12; Pro ectinto the per side and formed with a transverse beveled slot e','see'-Figs. 4 and 5. Journailed in the sides 6, bofthe bonnet B and ex end ng side. The rail R serves'as .down through the, machine,

supportsee Fig. 2, positioned at the side.of the bonnot B and adapted for manual operation to rotate the pin. The forward portion of the block E fits into a cross-slot b on the back of the bonnet B to locate the latter vertically on the rail R and when the lever G is raised the flat will be turned to allow the stud e to slide in under the pin 9. After the bonnet B has been adjusted in position on the rail R the lever G is turned down into the position shown in Fig. 2, and the rounded portion of the eccentric g will-then be carried into wedging engagement with the forward, beveled side of the'sl ot e of the stud e. This action causes the block E to be drawn for Ward in the slot 1' to lock it in place and to also clamp the-bonnet B firmly against the rail R to bind it in position thereon. In this manner the bonnets B may be attached rigidly to the front of the rail R while allowing for their lateral adjustment in relation to each other and with respect to the work to be operated upon.

Referring now to Figs. 3 and 4, the staple-forming and drivingmechanisms carried in the bonnets B is of substantially the same construction and arrangement as that shown and described in United States Letters Patent No. 970,461, granted-Sept. 20, 1910 to Thomas A. Briggs. They comprise essentially a wire-feed for feeding the wire a rotary anvil for receiving and holding the wire, cutters for severing it into lengths, a bender-bar for bending over the legs or sides of the staple, and a driver for inserting the staples through the ,work, all arranged and organized as next described. Formed. on the iImer faces ofthe parallel sides 6, b of the bonnet .neath the slide S is the staple-former or bender-bar H also. formed with splines A, la. fitted to slide in the grooves b, I) and carrying the wire-feed K on its front- The bender-bar H is connected to be reciprocated from the slide S by means of the driverbar D which is also adapted for movement independently of the bender-bar. As shown most clearly in Fig. 8 the benderbar H is formed with opposite, parallel sides II/,Qh', connected by a web It at the back, and extending down in the legs h, It which cooperate with the forming-anvilto bent over portion of the eccentric qthe legs of the staple as later described. On 181 the inner sides of the legs h h are grooves h, h for receiving the opposite, parallel legs of the staples after they have been bent over as hereinafter described. The driverbar D is fitted to slide between the sides h, h of the bender-bar; H and is held in place by a cross-member or cleat k which forms a recess on its rear face which forms a shoul-' adapted to bear upon the wire 'w to press it der 03 adapted to be engaged by a forwardly-projecting lip s at the bottom of the slide S, see Fig. 4. Engaging theup-' per edge of the driver-bar D is a plungerpin 8 fitted to the lower'end of a vertical bore a in the slide S. A coiled spring .9

held under compression in the bore 8 by a screw 8 bears against the pin .9 to normally maintain it pressed against a retaining shoulder 8 at the bottom of the slide S. This arrangement provides a yielding connection between the driver-bar D and the operating-slide S so that when the driver D" and bender-bar Hare forced down against cessive thickness, that is of greater thickness than what the machine is set for.

Through this provision the parts are pre- .85

vented from injury should the operator inadvertently or carelessly insert too many and an upper, square shoulder d of less depth. Between the shoulders d"d isa projection or lug d beveled off on its opvegthe bar D and formed'on its rear face posite sides at d, d. Mounted to slide in a lateral slot is cut through the cleat l0, see fig. 4, is a'latch or key-member K" fitted with a lug k adapted to engage the shoulders of the slot therein. The key K is normally held in the position illustrated in Fig: 8 by means of a wire spring k fastenedin a slot on the back of the benderbar H and having its upper end is bent forward and reaching out through a hole It. The latch K serves its a means for positively a by the slide S. The bender-bar H is normally moved, in the'bonnet B through a fric tion connection between it and the driverbar D. Referring to Fig. 4, a coiled spring 11 held ina pocket in a stud I screwed into the back of the bender-bar acts on a frie tionrplug i" to press the latter against the' rear face of the driver-bar D. Through this means the driver-bar D and bender-bar H are held together with sufficient friction to normally cause the latter to be moved against the ledge k on the cleat k. The end In of the wire spring 70 extends through Mounted to slide in a horizontal a hole j in the grip J and tends to press the serrated jaw v j-against the wire. Referring particularly to Figs. 3 and ,8, the operation of the latch K and wire grip J is controlled by means of a slideL held in a slot b in the side I) of the bonnet B and extending upwardly to the. top thereof. lower end the slide L is cutaway along its inner side to provide a slot l'in which the right-hand end of the latch K rides. At its bottom is a beveled shoulder Z against which the lower beveled side of the latch K strikes to force the latch to the left to and relieve the grip J from the wire w at the end of the feeding stroke, all as more fully explained hereinafter. p On the front of the bonnet B is a faceplate B having its edges fitted to rooves b, b in the sides. 6, b and held in p ace by spring-clips b", 6'' formed with shoulders overlapping its sides. At itslower end the plate B is'cut away to providea rectangular opening b through which the wire-feed block or cleat kprojects to adapt the latter to strike against the top edge thereof to'limit theextent of its upward movement. The plate B"-is adjustable up'and down in the slots 6*, b and may be set in different ositions to control the range of action 0 the wire-feed K so that the latter is regulated to feed the proper length of wirein accord"- ance with the length of staple required. The adjustment of ,the late B also serves to adjust. the position 0 the slide L which.

releases the wire-grip J at the lower end of the feeding stroke; At the topof'the'bonrelease the pressure of the wire-spring 16 net B is ablock B fitted between the sides a b, b and clamped inplace by a screw- 6 extending through it In the top of the block B isa screw 6 having its head. positioned in a recess 6 cutinto the side of the block, see Fig. 3, to adapt it to bear against the top of the bonnet B. By turning the screw the block may be adjusted vertically in the bonnet for a purpose as later described. Pivoted on the front of the'block B by means of a stud Z is a lever L, one end of which engages a slot Z in the release-slide L. The opposite end of the lever L is slotted at Z to receive a stud or pin b projecting rearwardly from the plate" B. Through this connection the movement of the plate B u or down in its slots in the bonnet B will e feet a relative movement of the release-slide L in the opposite direction. When the plate B is raised in the bonnet it will allow the wire-feed K to make a longer stroke upward and will also adjust the slide L to cause the wire-grip J to be'released .at a lower point in its downward stroke so that in this way the adjustment is compounded. In other words, less movement of the plate B is required to lengthen the operative stroke of the Wire-feed and increase the length of the staple than if only'one of the parts were therein.

movable. The vertical adjustment of the 'plate B is controlled by means connected with "the adjusting devices for the stapledriving mechanism of the machine as later describ d. v V

The wire '21; is fed down by the grip-device K to a rotary anvil 0, before mentioned, which is similar in construction and method of operation to that described in the patent above referred to. As shown in Figs. 3 and 4, an arm 0 extends outwardly from the side of the bonnet B near the bottom thereof and is formed with a circular bearing 01 brushing 0 at its end. Mounted to rotate in the' bearing 0 is the cylindrical. anvil 0 formed with a head or flange 0 at its outer endwhich normally abuts the end of the bearing to locate the anvil longitudinally beveled oil with a conical point or nose 0 formed with diametrical slots 0 0*extendmg across it at right-angles to each other.

The slot 0 is somewhat deeper than the slot 0* and receives the wire w as it is fed down by the feed-device K on the bender-- bar H. Asthe wire w is held in a vertical position while being fed by the wire-feed K, the anvil O is rotated through an angle of ninety degrees and this causes the wire I to be brought into the shallower slot 0. Then as the anvil O is turned back again to its first position,the length of wire w it to bear against the length of wire wheld in the slot '0" to retainit in place therein while the anvil is being rotated, 'see' Fig. 9. The method of operation of this part of the mechanism is fully described in'the The. inner end of the anvil O is patent above referred to and explained more in detail hereinafter. In the present arrangement the rotation of the anvil is effected by an improved and simplified mechanism, somewhat different from that previous patent, as next de- .eccentrieally on a pin u projecting from the front of the bonnet B is a hub U carrying a crank-pin u on its front face. Connected to the crank-pin u is a link U carrying a crank-pin u at its lower end inserted in a hole in the head of the anvil O. Preferably the link U is constructed, of flat ring-metal and is bent or bowed inward y toward its lower end to cause it to exert a pressure against the end of the anvil O. .Thls ressure tends to maintain the anvil .O wlth its flange or head 0 seated against the end of the bearing 0 while also cut away with an arcuate' slot at s and opposite this is a in s projecting forwardly from the front ace of the slide S. The pin a is adapted to enter a radial slot u inthe crank-disk U to turn the latter as the slide S descends in the bonnet B. With'the slide S at the upper end of its stroke, as shown in Fig. 3, the shoulder a of the crank-disk U engages its shoulder s" and is thereby restrained from turning during the first part of the movement of the slide. As

the slide S descends its pin 8 will enterthe slot u in the crank-disk U, see Fig. 10,

and the curved slot 8 .will allow the latter to rotate until its shoulder u brings up.

against the upper portion ofthe shoulder,- s' on the slide. At thi juncture the pin 3' asses out of the slotu and the disk U is ocked from further rotation until the slide S returns u wardly again. In this manner I the crank-dlsk -U.1s given an intermittent,

rotary motion in opposite directions through an angle of ninety degrees and an equal motion is imparted-through the link U to the anvil O, with both elements locked 4 I in position at the opposite extremes of their movement.

Fastened on the front of the faceplate B at its lower end is a guide or support B for the wire-cutters V, V. two bars formed with sharpened ends and These consist of I arranged with one bar V held fast in the slide therethrough.

guide B and the other'bar V adapted to As shown. in Fig. 12 the fixed cutter -is formed with a projection on its front which 'fits an opening in the front of the guide B to hold it in place t therein. The end of the cutter V projects beyond-the side of the guide B and is slotted across its front to provide a sharpened edge '0. The movable cutter V" slides in the guide B below the cutter V and is formed with an inclined end having 'a sharpened edge 1; at its top. Projecting from the rear v of the sliding cutter V is aninclined lug 41 adapted to engage a cam-groove 'v" in a ver-' tical plate V. The plate V is arranged to slide between the side 6 of the bonnet'B and the side of the bender-bar'H and is heldin place by the face-plate B. The plateV is adapted to be held frictionally to prevent unwarranted movement by a plug '0 pressed gagainst its rear face by a coiled spring '0 "able cutter and cooperating with the fixed cutter V will sever the wire at this point. After the wire is severed and the staple formed and driven,

located in a pocket in the sideof the bonnet B, see Fig. 11. At theupper end of the plate V is a rearwardly-projecting lug 'v adapted to be engaged by..the lower end of the spline s on the slide 8- to carry the plate downward, while the top of the spline k on the bender-bar H engages with the lug '0 to slide the late upward in the bonnet' As the plate 2 is moved'downward at the .end of the stroke of the slide S its cam-groove 'v acting throu h the lug 0 will slide the movacross the path of the wire 10,

into place as later described the upward stroke of the bender-bar H will raise the slide V to retract the cutter V to allow the wire to again be feddown to the anvil G.

Referring to Fig. 4 the bender-bar H car-.

- lies a staple-supporter Xhinged' toits rear. {side andadapted to hold the staple in place while it is being driven down throu h the work. This element may be of. an preferred construction and as here shown com prises an pivoted at its upper end on a cros-pin w and formed at its lower end with the staple-receiving block as. Projecting from the sides of the staple-supporter are pins a1 adapted to ride on the inclined faces I), b of cam-blocks 6? formed on the sides b, b of the bonnet B. At the lower end of the bonnet B is a pivoted arm Y carrying a roll 3 at its lower end over which the staple-supporter rides as it descends with the bender-bar H. The 'arm'Y is engaged :by the end of a spring'g/ pocketed in a stud y and is limited in its movement under action of the spring 3 by a projection on 'its upper end which strikes against apln yQ As the staple-suppoiter X- descends, its rear beveled face at rides across the roll yand forces it outward it' into place be-- was the endof the arin Q. A, washer g 125 handle in the grooves h, h in the legs 72. h of the tween the legs of the staple which are held" bender-bar When thedr iver-bar D descends its lower edge will ride along the 111- clined outer face w of the supporter X and force itrearwardly out of the way against the action of the spring'y. After the staple has been clenched in place and the benderbar H slides upward'inthe bonnet B the supporter X is 'carried'back outof'the way As previously stated the plate B Which regulates the stroke of the wire feed K and thereby the length'of the wire whigh is cut oil? to form the staple is adjusted by a means .which also controls the operative position of the bender-bar H. and driver-bar D. in

relation to the "work being operated. upon. r

This means is coordinated with the main drive-shaftM of the machine as shown particularly in Fig. 2, and isarranged to act universally in" connectionwitha plurality of heads 13 mounted on the supporting-rail R. The shaft M is journaled in a sleeve or quill Q which extends the length of the .arm A and is mounted in bearings a a at each end thereof. At the rearward end of the quill Q, the shaft M 'extends'through a bearing 9 5 arranged substantially concentric with the bore of the bearing a in which the quill sets. At its forward end, however, the hear: ing g for the shaft -M is bored eccentric to the bore of the front bearing a, in which the quill In other words, the axis of the shaft M at the forward end of the quill Q,

isoflset from or out of alinement with the axis of the quill itself. This provides that when the quill Q isrptated in its bearings in the arm A it will cause the forward end slightly from the horizontal, the object be; ing to adjustthe position ofthe parts cbn' 'to be operated upon by the stitching-devices.

work on the fixed table below the bonnetsB. Formed on the rear end of the quill Qis a vertical arm Q, beveled off at its top and carrying ahandle Q. screwed into'its end.

Fastened to the end of the quill-bearing a by means of the countersunk screws 9? is a.

semi-circular plate-or disk-like sector Q, see Fig. 7, having a beveled edge alining on the threaded portion of the handle overlies the edge of the sector Q and; is

I 'nected with'the shaft in'relation to the work -The,shaft M being operatively connected to V the staple-forming and driving devices as later described, it is-obviousthat any adjust. ment in its position will also serve to adjust a these parts. up and down relatively to the izo adapted to bewclamped thereagain'st by screwin thehandle into the arm Q/g The 2 provides'a convenient means for turning the-quill Q inits bearings and the 15 i by its pins w riding along the beveled sides i b of the cam-blocks b as before described;

105 a. of the shaft M to be raised or lowered washer 9 serves for locking the arm Q in arrangedon the rail B. As shown particularly in Figs. 4, 5 and 6, the connecting means between the crank M and the slides S of the several bonnets comprises essen-' tially a rectangular plate or cross-head extending across the machine parallel with and above the rail R and adapted to reciprocate up and down on the frame F. Fastened to the uprights f, f of the frame F or formed as a part thereof are two parallel arms or guides F, F, see Figs. 4 and 5, having vertical grooves f f on their inner sides. Fastened t0 the back of the cross-head N are two vertical rack-bars n, n

in this way the operating mechanisms in having tongues or splines 11/, n fitted to slide in the grooves F, f of the guides F, F. The inner faces of the rack-bars n, n are formed with teeth /fi' adapted to mesh with the teeth of two pinions M, n on the opposite ends of a cross-shaft n journaled in bearings in the arms F, F. Through this arrangement the movement of the crosshead N is equalized at its ends so thatthere will be no tendency for the splines a, n on the bars 'n, 'n. to cramp in the guidinggrooves f f Referring particularly to Figs. 2 and 5, the crosshead N isjconnected to be reciprocated from the crank-disk M by means of a link or connecting-rod N one end of which is pivoted on the crank-pin m and the opposite end on a pin m" projecting from the rear of the crosshead. On the lower edge of the crosshead N is a ledge n extending clear across its front face and formed with a horizontal slot n. Projecting from the rear face of the slide S. near its upper end, is a pin 8 flatted off on opposite sides to adapt it to enter the slot n in the crosshead N. It will be understood that each slide S is provided with a pin 8 for connecting it with the crosshead N. and

all of the bonnets. B are adapted to be driven from-the crank M onthe shaft M. This form of connection between the stitching-mechanismsand the driving-means provides for operating any number of heads from one drive-shaft and also allows for the adjustment of the heads laterall'y'on'the rail R. It will be understood from the foregoin description that by adjusting the forwar end of the drive-shaft M up or down in and is held in placeby a set-screw b". I head I)" of the. pin 6 fits a hole I) in the arm A the crosshead N connected with the crank-disk M will also be adjusted in vertical position. Through this means the slides S and their connected parts in the bonnets B may be adjusted in relation to the work to be operated upon as more fully explained hereinafter. The adjustment of the shaft M is-also arranged to coincidently adjust the face-plates B on the bonnets B to regulate the stroke of the reciprocating wire-feed K in accordance with the length of staple required. Themeans for effecting this second adjustment are as follows: Referring to Fig. 2, the outer end of'the quill Q is formed with a circular bearing g formed eccentric to the portion of the quill which seats in the bearing a inthe arm A but concentric to the axis of the shaft M. Surrounding the bearing g* is .an armor slide Z which'reaches up through a vertical slot i in the frame F and carries a forwardly extending lug a at its top. Fastened t0 the front of thelug 2 by meansof a stud z is a verticalplate or raiI Z 'by splines b fitting the grooves b", b in The slot 2 is adapted to be the sides 6, I), see Figs. 3 and 4:. The block B is connected with the face-plate B"which adjusts the stroke of the wire-feed by a pin or stud b. As shown in Fig. t the pin 6 is fitted to a bore in the bloclit rlg the faceplate' B and is preferably formed eccentric to the body of the pin so that by turning the latter the relation between the. parts may be altered within certain limits.-

That is .to say, when the pin 12 is turned in its bearing theplate B will be adjusted up and down in relation to the block B. A further adjustment between the plate B and the adjusting quill Q is provided by the stud 2 which connects the plate Z with the arm Z. As shown in Fig. 4 the head 2 of the stud a which engages a hole in the plate. Z is formed eccentric to'the portion of the stud which is mounted in the lug z of the arm Z. By turning the stud z the plate Z '7 may be raised or lowered on the arm Z. By means of these two adjustments the face-plates of the several heads used on or rail Z is raised or lowered to simulta neously adjust the positions of the faceplates B on the bonnets B when the quill Q is turned to adjust the height of the forward end of the drive-shaft M. To provide 'for a parallel movement of the plate from the plate'Z. ment ofthe the slideor armZtI employ e ualizing arms Z, Z mounted on the ends a cross-shaft s which is Ijournaled in bearings inthe side arms F,

a, z to allow a limited amount of-p'lay so that the ranged to operate in connection with a fixed clencher-block which acts to clench the legs mechanisms in the-stitcher-heads plate is not thrown out of its vertical osition. V

Insome types of machines the apleformingand driving mechanisms are arof the staple in place after they have been insertedthrough the work. In other cases oscillating clencher-levers are employed to bend the legs of the staple into place and the present machine is .ada ted for either ar-' rangement: In, the drawings I have preferred-to show the machine as complete with movable clenchers for cooperatin with the Referring to Figs. 1,2 and 5, a rectangular; boxlike frame C is mounted on the top of the 7 forward column of the frame P and bei oted on the shaft 0.

' upwardly from the'rear en of the lever C its upper end. cam.

the rotation of, the shaft imparts a rocking tween its sides is'a rockable frame .0 piv;

Connected to the forward end of the frame (1" is alink a pivotally "oinedat its lower end to a horizontal lever l vfulcrumed at con the main frame P of the machine, see-Fi. 1. Extending is an arm a"carr ing a block or roll 0 .at T- e roll 0 is enfiiged by a fast on the drive-shaft whereby motion to the lever C to oscillate the frame C in a manner as well known and generally tion to which they may employed in'machines of this type. The upper portion of the frame C is formed with a vertical front face a scored along its length with ahorizontalT-shaped slot 0, see Fig. 2. Fitted to slide along the front face a are a" series of plates or clencher-supportersfc having tongues 10 on their rear faces fitted to the slot a Fitted to slide in the slot 0' at the rear'of the tongues 0" are T-headed pins or studs 0 reachin through hbles in the plates 0 and threa ed to receive the nuts c? on their outer ends. Two studsc"- are provided for each clencherplate c 'andby tightening their nuts 0" they may be clamped in place in any 'posie' adjusted along the frame C. Plvoted .at the to of the plates 0" are the clenchers c whic consist of pairs of fockable levers adapted to be pressed up against the legs of the staple to of thework. The clenchers c are of usual construction having openings 0? engaged by the rearwardly projecting hp 0" ofa slide 0" mounted to reci' rocate on the front,

of the plate 0 and held in place and guided by the nuts 0 and a cleat 0", see Fig. 5; At their lower ends the slides a are formed with rearwardly projecting lips a-iadapted to enter a horizontal slot 0" in the front of the oscillating frame C from which they derive their motion. Through these connections the clenchers 0" are operated intermittently'to cooperate with the staple-driving devices in the bonnets B and it is to be Iioted that the several sets of clenchers may be adjusted laterally in position on the frame C in accordance with the position of their respective bonnets Without alteringthe driving-connections". Any required number of sets of clenchers may be applied tothe machine in accordance with theinumber of heads or Bonnets B being employed and the capacity of the machine s only limited in this re set by? the length of the rail R and frame ciated clencher-mechanisms may be extended within reasonable limits to adapt themachine for work of considerable breadth or forfa multiple series of se arate *pieces of That is to say, the parts for supporting the stitcher-heads and their assos work as ona printing-press, older or binder. a

The method of operation of the complete machine is as follows: In installing the .machine for use as many heads orbonnets B are attached to therail R as required for the work in hand. For instance, in stapling calendar pads to cards, stitching signatures for booklets, or for similar work two,. three, four, or any numberof staples may be inserted simultaneously by providing the required number of heads B on the machine, and the staples may be set with any desired spacing by adjusting the headslaterall in relation to each other. After the heads ave been set in position 'the hand-levers G, see Fig. 2, are turned down toclamp them in place on the rail Ruby means of the blocks E as previously explained. In adjusting the stitching-mechanisms to the work inconformity with its thickness the sheets of material to bestitched 0r stapled together are placed on the work-support T and the shaft M is then turned by hand to bring the bender-bar H j and driverD' down to their lowermost posi- .tion. The quill-handle Q is then turned to rotate the quill Q, and adjustthe POSitiOILOf the shaft M so that the lower ends of the bender-bar and" driver will' be set down againstthe work with a slight pressure thereon. After this adjustment is com-' leted the handle Q, is screwed into the arm 7 locked in position against accidental disbend them in place against the under side placement. The blocks B arenext adjusted means of their screws b" to set the levers L m vertical position in the bonnets B, by

to provide for theproper positioning of the plates B- and slides L in relation tothe forming-anvil O. This adjustment regulates the extent'to which the-wire w will be fed down through the anvils 0 so as to equalize the ends of the severed length '20 projecting therefrom .wherebyboth legs of the staple will -be bent to the same length. The face-plate B of.the several bonnets B 10 are nowadjusted by means of their eceentric studs 5", see Fig. 4, to regulate. theirposi tion in relation to the blocks B and-the plate Z so that they will all be set to allow a uniform length of stroke of the wire-feed K as later described. At the same time the justments for regulating the relation be-' tween the plate B and its cooperatin parts are only made once, usually. when the machine is first assembled, and, thereafter the adjustment of the quill Q, to set the benderbar H and driver D also acts through the I arm Z to regulate the position offthe plate B" in-conformity with the thickness of the work. That is to say, after the machine has once been set with its parts in theirproper relation only a single adjustment is necessary to regulate the action of the coordinated mechanisms for different thicknesses of material to be stapled. This adjustment is made by setting the handle Q as before explained, and serves'to simultaneousl ad- 'ust the mechanisms of the whole ser es of I 40 eads B on therail R.

Power is applied to the machine through the driving-pulley M and'when the clutch is thrown in the shaft M will be rotated to turn thecrank-di M and 5, to reciprocate the-crosshead N which slides on the guides F, F ,with its motionmaintained parallel b the Tack-bars a, n.

crosshead I a reciprocatory m0- Frorn' flee tion is i parted to the several slides S in the series of bonnets B; As the arrangement of the stapling-mechanisms .is the same in all of the heads B it will s'lifiice to explain the method of operation of one of them only.

Referring first to Fig. 1,-- the wire 10 for the staples is supplied from spools W rotatively .mounted on the top of, the frame F and [thence itleads over curved guides-W and 65 drawn down through the feeding-device K I The crankM acts 45 through the connctingvrod N, see Figs. '2

and thence between the cutting edges-of the cutters V, V to the forming-anvil O.

lVith the bender-bar H at the upper end of. its. stroke as shown in Figs.3 and 4, the latch K will be projected to the right with its end inthe slot Z of the slide L and the wire grip J will consequently be forced by 'the s'pripg k against the Wire w to clamp the latter against the ledge k .on the cleat or block 76; Referring now to Fig. 8 which also shows the bender-bar H and driver-bar D. at the upperend of the stroke, it will be noted that the lug k on the latch K is in the lower end of the slot d of the driver-bar in its deeper portion with its upper, beveled shoulder in contact with the beveled shoulder d of the-lug d Now, as the slide S starts to descend the driver-bar D is carried down with it and the engagement -of these shoulders combined with the friction action of'the plug 2', see Fig. 4, causes the benderbar H to be moved downwardly in'the bon net B. The wire-feed K, as before stated,

has. taken a grip on the ,wire 11: and consequently the wire will be drawn down and fed 7 to the anvil 0. 'On the first descent of the slide S and its connected is fed through the slot 0 1n the end of the ters V, V which are actuated from the camplate V at the end of the stroke of the slide S, as previously explained. It has also been explalned that asthe slide S approaches the end of its downwardstroke the pin 8 in .its front engages the slot to in the hub U,,

across' its beveled end and after the anvil has reached the extent of its rotary movement through an angle of ninety degrees its shallow slot 0 will have assumeda vertical pogition. The end of the wire to being still unsevered from the main length and being therefore held vertical will thus be causedinto the groove 0 of the anvil O to sna where 1t is held by the spring clip 0 shown in the detail view, Fig. 9. As soon asthe wire wristhus seated in the groove ,0 the anvil O ceases to rotate, and at this juncture "the last end of the movement of the slide S causes the cutters V,V to act to sever it.

arts the wire w anvil O- and 1s afterward severed by the cut- In other words, the anvil 0 comes to for "an interval-while thelength of Wire w from which the staple is formed is being cut off from the main piece, and as soonas this is accomplished. the slide S starts to .move

spring link U until the severed length of upward again." After the-slide S starts to ascend the hub U will be turned. to rotate the anv-ilO in the opposite direction from that indicated by the arrow 3-,F1g. 3, and continuing its movement will turn the anvil vback to its original position. This reverse rotation of the anvil 0 will therefore carry the severed length of wire w held in its slot 0* into a horizontal position, as shown byfull lines in Fig. 9, while'the slot 0 is being returned into vertical position to receive the next length of. wire fed downward. As the driver D ascends with the driverbar D it allows the anvil O to be forced longitudinally forward by the action of the wire w which it carries in the slot 0* is brought into position directly beneath the bender-bar H. Now, as the bender-bar de-' scends again its legs if, h are brought against the ends of the severed wire'w' which project from the sides of the anvil O to bend them down at right-angles to the mid portion of the wire held in the slot 0*. In this manner the opposite, parallel sides or legs "of the staple are bent into position to be received in the grooves h, h of the benderbar H. After the bender-bar H has been carried down to bring the lower ends of its legs h, h against the work, its further movement is resisted thereby and the driver D starts to descend within the bender-bar H. Meanwhile the staple-supporter X has swung p out into position between the legs h h of,

the bender-bar H to support the staple above the work while guiding its legs as they are driven down therethrough. It is to be understood that the coaction' of these parts is essentially the same as that of the mechanism described in the patent to Briggs befor're ferred to wherein a more detailed explanation is given. t

The staple being held in the bender-bar H with its ends or driving-points in contact with the work the action of the driver D is to force it through the work while the clenchers 0 are carried upward through the work-support T to bend the. legs over and clench them in place. These operations are carried out in the usual mannerwith the movement of the clencher-operating meanssynchronized with that of the drivin -mechanism through their connection w1th.the main driving-shaft M. As the driver D is carried down its lower edge forces the anvil O rearwardly in its bearing 0- so that the formed staple held in the bender-bar H rides out of the slot 0. Finally, the grooved, lower edge ofthe driver D comes into action against the top of the staple to drive it down and out of the bender-bar and through the material being stitched. It will be under-, that the action of the driver bar D is continuous, but that first it moves the bender bar down through friction and. then when v "against the action of the s ring k. as the driver-bar approac es the end of its tween the legs h h of thebender-bar. As

the drive-bar D approaches the end of its descent the right-hand beveled end of the latch K rides against the'bevel Z on the side of the slide L and this forces the latch back to release the gripper J from the wire o. It will thus be seen that through the adustmentof the slide L up and down in the bonnet B the wire-gripK may be released at a point commensurate with the length of wir'eto be fed for any given length of staple. It has been explained that the slide L is adjusted from the movement of the plate B and that the position of. the opening b in the plate regulates the upward extent of the stroke of the wire-feed K. Through the correlation of these parts the operative.

stroke of the wire-feed K and the position of the cutters V, V' is controlled in accordance with the length of wire required for the staple, and this adjustment is efiected at the i same time that the position of the-stitchingmechanism is adjusted in relation to the work. In other words, the single adjustment of the position of the driver-shaft M through the means of the handle Q serves to regulate the downward limit of the stroke pf the: driver D and also acts to adjust the feed of the wire, thepoint of severance thereof,- and thereby the length of the staple in conformity with the thickness of the stock beng operated upon. a

I Afterthe staple has been driven through the work andits legs clenched in place the slide S starts to ascend carrying with it the .driver-bar D and bender-bar H. Referring to Fig. 8, during the last part of the downward stroke of the driver-bar D the lug d on its side rides underthe beveledlug k on the back of v the latch K and the latter finally seats in the upper end of the slot (1 against the shoulder d. It has been explained that this end of the slot (1 is of less depth than the lower end andhence the latch K is maintained bearing against the end, of the spring k to prevent the latter from forcing the grip J. against the-wire w. This provides that when the bender-bar H is being raised through its frictionconnection with the driver-bar D the wire to will not be carried upward from the position to which it has been fed. lWhen however, the block k of the wire-feed K strikes against the edge of the opening I; in the plate B, further upward movement of the bender-bar H is upward strokeits lug d rides out un- CLO I der the lug k on the latchK' and the latter is allowed to slide to the'right, thus permitting the wire-grip J to once more take a bite on the wire w so that the latter will again be fed down to the anvil O at the next downward movement of the bender-bar H. In this way the coordinated parts are operated continuously from the reciprocation of-the slide S to form, drive and clench a staple at each rotation of the shaft M. r

It will be seen from the foregoing description that my improvement provides for from the spirit or scope of the invention;

the, automatic operation of a plurality of separate stitcher-heads and their associated clencher-devices as a complete, organized machine. Furthermore through the ingenious arrangement for coordinating the several mechanisms to adapt them to be driven from a single shaft the heads are all adjustable independently to regulate the spacing of the staples and in addition 'a single, universal adjustment serves to set the several mechanisms as a unit for forming staples of different length in conformity with varying thicknesses of stock being operated upon. In this way my improved apparatus is adapted to a Wide variety of wolyk on different types of machines while its productive capacity is greatly increased and its operation rendered more economical.

, Various modifications might be made in the construction and arrangement of the parts of. the apparatus without departing therefore, without limiting myself to the exact embodiment shown, what I claim is:-

1. In a wire-stitching or stapling machine,

- the combination with a plurality of stitcherheads containing coordinated staple-forming and driving mechanisms, of means to mount said heads in series, means to connect the mechanisms of the several heads to operate together 1n unison, a'horizontal drive-shaft .arranged to reciprocate said connectingmeans, and means to adjust said shaft vertically-to regulate the position of all of the.

several mechanisms in the several headsin relation to the work to be stitched.

' the combination with a plurality of heads- 2. In a wire-stitching or stapling machine,

carrying separate stitching-mechanisms, of means to mount said heads in series to provide for their lateral adjustment in relation I to'each other, means connecting the mechanisms of the several heads to operate in unison, a horizontal drive-shaft arranged to reciprocate the connecting-means for the stitching-mechanisms, and means to adjust 6 said shaft vertically to regulate the position of all of the stitching-mechanisms in relation to the work to be stitched.

3. In a wire-stitching or stapling machine,

the combination with a plurality of separate stitching-mechanisms, of means for detachably supporting said mechanisms in series,

'- means for coordinating the several stitchingmechanisms to operate together, a single driving-means for simultaneously operating the several mechanisms, a crank-shaft for reciprocating said driving-means, and means to adjust said crank-shaft vertically to simultaneously regulate the position of all of the stitching-mechanisms in relation to the Work to be stitched. v

4. In a wire-stitching or stapling machine, the combination with a plurality of heads carrying. separate stitching-mechanisms, of

a horizontal rail for supporting said heads in series, clamping-means for attaching the heads at different points along the rail, means adapted to be reciprocated in relation to the rail, means for individually connecting the mechanisms of the heads to be operated from said reciprocating-means,- a horizontal drive-shaft for actuating the reciproeating-means, and means to adjust .said

' drive-shaft vertically to regulate the range of action of the stitching-me'cha nisms in relation to the work being operated. upon.

5. In a wire-stitching machine, thetcombination with a series of stitcher-heads carrying separate stitching-mechanisms, of a single means for operating the several stitch ing-mechanisms in unison, a crank-shaft for reclprocatlng said operating-.means, and

means for adjusting the vertical position of the crank-shaft to simultaneously regulate the operative position of all of the stitching- .mechanisms in relation to the work in accordance with the thickness of the stock to .be stitched.

6. In a wire-stitching machine, the combination with a series of vertically-operating stitching-mechanisms, of a reciprocable crosshead connected to operate the several stitching-mechanisms, a crank for reciprocating the crosshead, and means to adjust the operative position of the crank to regulate the range of action of the stitching-mechanisms in relationto the work being operated upon.

7 In a wire-stitching machine, the combination with a plurality of separate stitching mechanisms, of means for supporting said mechanisms in series, reciprocating-means for operating the stitching-mechanisms in unison, a crank-shaft to reciprocate said means, a bearing'for said shaft, and means for adjusting said shaft vertically in its bearing to regulate the operative position of the stitching-mechanisms in relation to the work being stitched.

8. In a wire-stitching machine, the combination with a series of separate" stitchingmechanisms, of means for regulating their action in conformity withthe thickness of the work to be stitched, means for operating the several stitching-mechanisms in unison, and a single means for adjusting the posi tion of all of the stitching-mechanisms in relation to the work and for simultaneously adjusting their regulatingmeans in conformity with the thickness of the work. 9. In a wire-stitching machine, the combi nation with a series of vertically-recipro- -cable stitching-mechanisms, of a crosshead connected to reciprocate the several stitchlug-mechanisms in un1son,

means to reciprocate the crosshead, and means to adjust the position of the reciprocating-means vertically to regulate the operative position of the stitching-mechanisms in relation to the work being stitched.

10. In a wire-stitchinginachine, the combination with a plurality of heads carrying separate stitching-mechanisms, of a reciprocable crosshead connected to operate the several stitching-mechanisms, means to reclprocate the crosshead, and means to ad ust the position of the'reciprocating-means vertically in relation to the, heads to regulate the range. of action of the stitching-mechanisms operating therein. i

, 11. In a wire-stitching machine, the com- I bination with aseries of vertically-operating stitching-mechanisms, of a reciprocable crosshead connected to operate the stitching mechanisms, a crank-shaft connected to reciprocate the crosshead, and means to adjust the-crankshaft vertically in position to regulate the range of action mechanisms in relation to operated upon.

of the stitching. the work being- 7 12. In a wire-stitching machine, the com bination with a series of vertically-operating Stitching-mechanisms,

of a reclprocable 'crosshead connected to operate the stitching; mechanisms, a crank-shaft connected to rte-- ciprocate the crosshead, a bearingfor the crank-shaft, and

ing and lowering adjustable means for raisparts connected therewith in relation to the I work being operated upon.

13. In a wlre-stitching machine, the cornbination with a series of vertically-operating stitching-mechanisms, of a crosshead connected to o erate the stitching-mechanisms,

a" rotating s aft connected to reciprocate the crosshead, an eccentric bearing for the shaft,

and" meansto turn said bearing to raise or lower the shaft therein to' adjust-the operafrom relation to the work being operated mechanism,

" to raise/or lower. the shaft, and means to-- tive position of the parts reciprocated thereupon. y p

14. In ,a wire-stitching machine, the com-" bination with vertically-operating stitchingi a 1 rotating shaft for reciprocating the crosshead, a quilllike bearing cally mounted, means to 'turn said bearing lock said bearing in place to maintain the shaft in its adjusted .position:

g 1 15. In a wire-st tchmg the com-1 I the crank-shaft in its bear- .ing to regulate the operative position of the;

of a crosshead connected to operate the stitching-mechanism,

inwhich said shaft is eccentri--- eachnther', of a 'plu'ralitiyl v bination with a vertically-operating stitching -mechanism,

ciprocate the stitchingmechanism, a quilllike hearing in which said shaft is eccentri-' call'y mounted, a handle for rotating said bearing, a sector with which the handle cooperates, and means for locking said handle at difi'erent points on the sectortoretain the bearing in the position to which it is ad.-v

justed. I

16. In a wire-stitching machine, the combination with a work-support, of a plurality of a shaft connectedjto re-' of stitcher-heads carrying separate .stitch I arranged above said worksupport, means for: detachably mounting said heads in series, a reciprocating crosshead formed with a longitudinal groove,

ing-mechanism's' adapted to engage the groove in the cross head to connect them to be operated therefrom'while' providingfor their-lateral adjustment in relation to each other, a crankmeans onthe several stitching-mechan sms shaft for reciprocating the crosshead and erent points along the cally to regulate the position of the stitch-" ing-mechanismsin relation to the work;

18. In a wire-stitching machine, the combination with a series of stitchin nisms tori sorting a'plurality 0 ,through the work being operated ,upon, of a series oi'cooperating clenbhe'nmeans for clenching the staples in place asthey are inserted through the work, means for adjustingthe stitching-mechanisms laterally. in 'relation to each other,

11% -mcha;

staples means tor adjusting the I clencherameans incorrelationwith the stitch- I I ingmechan1sms, means connected to recip= rocate the stitching-mechanisms in u'nison,

a drive-shaft for a'ctuatingsaid IBGlPTOCatr ing-nfeans, means vertically to regulate the stitching-mechanisms in relation to, the cle'ncher-means, and means operated from the crank-shaft tooperate to ad]ust SaiddriVe-f shaft position of the v the clencher-l V 'means in synchrony with .the operation of Y the stitching-mechanisms. 1951s., wire stitchin'g bination 'with,,a "plurality anism's adjustable laterally in for v co'iiperating with and 'a justable in gel ion therewith,

mac e, the com; of st i t ehing-mech relation to of: clencher-means efstitching mechaa horizontally-arranged crank-shaft connected to operate all of the stitching-mechanisms in unison, means driven from said shaft to operate the clencher-means in synchrony with the operation of the stitchingmechanisms, and means to adjust the crankshaft vertically to regulate the position of the stitching-mechanisms in relation to the clencher-means. 20. In a wire-stitching machine, the combination with a stitcher-head carrying vertically reciprocable wire feeding stapleforming and staple-driving means, of means to adjust the operative position of the staple driving means in relation to the work being operated on, and means to simultaneously .ple and to simultaneously ad ust the range adjust the range of action of the wire-feeding and staple-forming means to regulate the length of staple in accordance with the thickness of the work.

21. In a wire-stitching machine, the combination with a stitcher-head com rising eeding' vertically-reciprocable means for the wire for forming the staples, means for forming the staples, and means for driving the staples through the work, of means to adjust the operative stroke of the wirefeeding means to regulate the length 6f thestaof action of thestaple-driving means 111 conformity with the thickness of the stock being operated upon. 1

. 22. In a wire-stitching machine, the combination with a vertically-reciprocable wirea5 feeding device, a forming-device for form'- ing the wire into staples, a driver 'for driving the staples through the work, of means to control the stroke of the wire-feed .to

, regulate the length of the staples, and means for adjusting said controlling-means and for simultaneously regulating the range of action .of the staple-driver in accordance with the thickness of the work being operated upon. 1

23. In a wire-stitching machine, the combig1ation with" a .fixed work-support, of a stitcher-head mounted abovethe work-support, stitching-mechanism reci'procable verand sta le-driving devices in relation to the wor support to regulate. the length of the staple and its insertion through the tically in the stitcher-head comprising wire- .feeding, staple-forming and staple-driving and means to adjust-the range of devices, action of the wire-feeding, staple-forming work in ,conformity with the thieknes of th Stock b lng operated upon'. p

24. In a wire-stitching machine, the com- .bination with a' fixed work-support, of a 'stitcher-head mounted above said s'upport,,

wire feedin'g and staple-forming devices verticallyreciprocable in the stitcher-head to form the staples, a staple-driver also reciprocable inthe head to drive tlie staples through the 'work,means to reciprocate said,

wire-feeding, forming-devices and stapledriver, and means to adjust their range of action to regulate the forming and driving of the staple in accordance with the thickness of the stock being operated upon.

25. In a wire-stitching machine, the combination with a stitcher-head, of a wirefeeding device vertically reciprocable in said head, a staple-former also reciprocable in the head, a reelprocable staple-driver, means to adjust the stroke of the wire-feeding device to regulate the length of the staple, and means to simultaneously adjust the stroke of the staple-driver in accordance with the "thickness of the stock being operated upon.

' 26. In a wire stitching machine, the con bination with a stitcher-head, of a staple former reciprocable therein, a wire-feed on the staple-former, a 'reciprocable stapledriver, means toreciprocate said stapleformer and driver, means to adjust the length of stroke of the wire-feed to regulate the length of the staple, and means to I adjust the range of action of-the stapledriver in relation to the work, both of said adj usting-means being operable'in unison in accordance with the thickness of the work being operated upon. j

27. In awire-stitching machine, the combination with a reciprocable slide, of means to adjust the range of action of the slide, a driver-bar reciprocated from the slide, a

staple-driver on said bar, a bender-bar adapted to be driven throu h frictional engagement with the driverar, a wire-feed on the bender-bar, an :anvil cooperating with the bender-bar to form the staple, and means to control the stroke of the benderbar to regulate the action of the wire-feed in accordance with the length of staple required. v a Y 28. In a wire-stitching machine, the combination with a reciprocable" slldef of a bender-bar reciprocated from the slide, means cooperating with the bender-bar to formthe staple, a staple-driver also reciprocated from the slide, a wire-feed reci rocable with the bender-bar, means to ad ust the operative length of stroke of the wirefeed to regulate the length of the staple, and means to simultaneously adjust the range of action of the driver in accordance with the thiclmess of the work being stapled.

' 29 In a wire-stitching machine, the com-- bination with a reciprocableslide, of a slidingbendenbar reciprocated from said slide,

a wire-feed on the bender-bar, means cooperating with the bender-bar to form the staple from the'length' of wire fed thereby, means to adjust the operative length of stroke of "the wire-feed, a staple-driver reciprocated from the slide, and means to ad- I just the range of action of thestaple-driver in accordance with the thickness 01? th work beingoperated upon. I

chine, the combination with a reciprocable bender-bar, of means cofiperating therewith to form the staple, a wire-feed carried by the bender-bar and acting to grip and feed the wire throughout its movement with the bender-bar, means to limit the stroke of the wire-feed, means to release the grip of the wirefeed' on the wire, and means to adjust the stroke limit for the wire-feed and to simultaneously adjust the grip-releasing 'means. i

i 31. In a wire-stitching or stapling machine, the combination with a reciprocating bender-bar, 'of a wire-feed reciprocable therewith, means cooperating with the bender-bar'to form the staple from a length of wire fed by the wire-feed, means to ad-- just the stroke of the wire-feed, adjustable means to release the wire-feed from the wire at one end of its stroke, and means to control said stroke-adjusting means and said wire-feed releasing-means in unison. 32; In a wire-stitching or stapling machine, the combination with a reciprocating bender-bar, of a wire-feed reciprocable therewith, means cooperating with the benderbar to form the staple from a length of wire fed by the wire-feed, means engaged by the wire-feed to limit its stroke in one direction, means engaged by the wire-feed to release it from the wire during itsmovement in the opposite direction, and means to adjust said stroke-limiting means andreleasing-means in unison to regulate the length-0f wirefed by the wire-feed.

33. In a'wire-stitehing or stapling m chine, the comhination'with a"- bonnet, of a benderrbarreciprocable in said bonnet, a

' 40' wire-feed reciprocable with the bender-bar,

' means coiiperatin with the bender-bar to -form the staple cm the 'wire fed by the x wire-feed, a plate adju'stahleon the bonnet to 'control the lengthof stroke of the wire-' feed,'1neans adjustable onthe bonnet to 113+ 16 se the wire-feed from-the wire at one end i of stroke, and means connecting said plate and said releasing-means to adapt themto be adjusted'in unison.

, 34. In' awire-stitching or stapling machine, the combination with-a reciprocable slide, of a bender-bar reciprocated from said Y- slide, a rotatable anvil for cooperating with the bender bar to form the staples, a rota table hub, means on the slide for'rotating the a p hub .from the reciprocatory motion thereof,

a crank; on the hub, and means connecting 'the crank with the anvil to rotate the latter the descent of the bender-b means for the wire-feeding devices.

rotated from the movement of the slide, a

crank on said hub, and a link connecting c said crank with the anvil to impart rotation thereto. v

36. In a wire-stitching or stapling ma- 1 chine, the combination with a reciprocable slide, of a hub rotated from the movement of the slide, a crank-pin. on said hub, a rotatable forming-anvil, meansto mount said. anvil to adapt it to slide longitudinally of its axis a bender-bar reciprocated-from the slide to cooperate with the anvil to form the staples, and a spring-link arranged to connect the anvil with the crank-pin on the hub to cause it to be rotated'therefrom and to press upon the anvil during its rotation to control its position in relation to the bender-bar.

37. In a wiresstitching machine, the combination with a plurality of stitcher-heads, of means to mount said heads in series, wirefeedin devices in each head, staple-forming and driving devices in each head, means for simultaneously adjustin the range of action of the severalrwire-fee ing devices to regulate the length of the staples, means for 90 operating the staple-forming and driving devices of the several heads in unison, and means for adjusting said operating-means to regulate the operative position of all of the staple-forming and drivin devices, said means connected to operate t e'adjusting- 38. In a wire-stitching machine, the combination with a plurality of stitchr-heads, of staple-formin and driving devices in each head, wireceding devices in the several heads, a single operating means for all ofthe heads, means for adjusting said operating-means to regulate the operative position of all of the staple-formingn and driving devices in relation to the workto be stitched, and means connected with said adjustingmeans for simultaneously controlling the action ofthe several wire-feedin" devices to regulate the length of the staplesln conformity with the thickness of the work,

39. In a wire-stitching machine, the combination with a plurality of stitcher-heads,

of staple-forniin andfdriving devices. in eachhead, wireceding devices in the several heads, a single operating-means for all. of the heads, means for adjusting said operating-means to regulate the operative position of the several staple-forming and driv-- ing devices inconformity to the thickness of the stock to be stitched, andmeans' connected therewith to be adiustedtherefrom for controlling the action or the wire-feeding means to regulate the length of the staples. f 4,0. Ina wire-stitching or stapling? machine, the combination w1th a reciprocating bender-bar, ot a wire-gfeed 'reciprocable therewith, n anvil cooperating with the bender-bar to form the staple from a length of wire fed by the wire-feed, means engaged by the wire-feed to limit its Stroke in one direction, means engaged by the wire-feed to release it from the wire during its stroke in the opposite direction, and means for adjusting the position of the wire-feed strokelimiting means and releasing-means in relation to the forming-anvil.

41. In a wire-stitching machine, the combination with a vertically reciprocating bender-bar, of means cooperating therewith to form the staple from a length of wire fed thereto, a staple-driver for driving the staple through the work, a staple-supporter pivoted on the bender-bar to adapt it to move into position between the legs of the formed staple, and means for controlling the action of the staple-supporter to allow It to move into operative position as the benderbar descends and to retract it from said position as the bender-bar moves upward.

42. In a wireetitching machine, the combination with a vertically reciprocating 26 bender-bar, of means cooperating therew th to form the staple from a length of wire fed thereto, a staple-driver for driving the staple through the work, a staple-supporter pivoted on the bender-bar to adapt it to move 80 into position between the legs ofthe formed staple,'m eans for controlling the action of the staple-supporter to allow'it to move into operative position as the bender-bar descends and to retract it from said position 35 as the bender-bar moves upward, and resiliently-operated means adapted to engage the staple-supporter to yieldingly maintain it in its operative position,

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature. 40

ARTHUR MAYNARD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3191925 *Dec 17, 1962Jun 29, 1965Chicago Machinery Lab IncSignature machines
US4196835 *Feb 21, 1979Apr 8, 1980Harris CorporationStitching machine
US4410123 *Oct 21, 1981Oct 18, 1983Interlake, Inc.Wire stitching machine head
US4485955 *Jan 12, 1983Dec 4, 1984Interlake, Inc.Wire loop stitching machine head with cam-controlled staple supporter
US4505415 *Sep 20, 1982Mar 19, 1985Interlake, Inc.Wire loop stitching machine head
US4593847 *May 1, 1985Jun 10, 1986Interlake, Inc.Bypass clincher for stitching machine
US4722467 *Jun 9, 1986Feb 2, 1988Interlake, Inc.Wire guide apparatus for wire stitching machine head
US4898314 *Oct 20, 1988Feb 6, 1990International Business Machines CorporationMethod and apparatus for stitcher wire loading
US4932579 *Mar 23, 1989Jun 12, 1990The Interlake Companies, Inc.Stapling apparatus with stack joggers
EP0365457A2 *Sep 12, 1989Apr 25, 1990International Business Machines CorporationApparatus for stitcher wire loading
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/84, 227/156, 227/89, 227/154, 227/111
Cooperative ClassificationB27F7/21