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Publication numberUS1255611 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1918
Filing dateJul 26, 1917
Priority dateJul 26, 1917
Publication numberUS 1255611 A, US 1255611A, US-A-1255611, US1255611 A, US1255611A
InventorsHarry C Innes
Original AssigneeCarey Philip Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Joint-strip-laying device and method.
US 1255611 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

momma. JOINT STRIP LAYING DEVICE AND METHOD.

APPLICATION FILED IULY26. IQIL Patented 51918 HARRY C. INNES,0F CINCINNATI, Q OHIC L'ASSIGNOR TO THE PHILIP CAREY MANUFAC- TUBING COMPANY, OF LOCKLAND, OHIO,- A CORPORATION OF OHIO.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Feb. 5, 1918.

Application filed July 26, 1917. Serial No. 182,860.

object is to provide means for more readily and ccurately posltioning the joint strips which are used between adjacent sections of paving to compensate for the contractlon and expansion of the paving.

My invention consists in the combination of partsand in the details of construction and arrangement of parts and in the method.

as will hereinafter be more fully described and claimed.

In the drawing:

Figure 1 is a general perspective view of part of a pavement under construction showmg my invention in use;

Fig. 2 is a "similar view showing a modification of my invention;

Fig. 3 is a partial plan viewof the device as shown in Fig. 1 or Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a vertical cross-section on a plane colresponding to the line 4-4 of Fig. 3; an 7 Fig. 5 is a detail perspective view showin another modification of my invention.

T/Iy invention is more especially intended for use in the construction of concrete aving and concrete beds for brick, stone, b ock or other pavement.

The joint strips used are generally made up of some kind of fibrous or granular material combined with some adhesive material, as for instance, a fibrous material or granular mineral substance combined with bituminous material, the purpose being to provide a strip which is yielding orelastic and must be compressed when the pavement expands and in some measure expand again when the pavement contracts. Such strips are usually provided in lengths of several feet and of width equal to-the depth of the pavement and generally from one-fourth to one-half inch thick. Such stri s of such width and thickness and in su h ength and made of such material are somewhat flexible,

pen when the concrete is put in the and, of course, being thin'do not readily stand alone in the vertical position they are to have in the pavement. Consequently, the ordinary methods heretofore. employed are attended with considerable trouble, because the joint strips have become bent in shipping and handling and are easily overturned when set in vertical position across the subgrade even where stakes are driven to hold them up; this being especially liable to hapave ment and flows against the strip. nder such difficulties it often results that the strips, instead of being arranged in a practically straight line end for end across the subgrade and standing in vertical position, are curved in various directions, their ends do not properly meet and they lean one way. or the other after the concrete has been poured on both sides of the strips. This, of

course, is a very unsatisfactory condition;

and especially is the leaning of the strip one way or the other highly undesirable because then instead of functioning as a compressible and expansible element to compensate for the expansion and contraction of the paving sections on both sides of it, the strip acts as an incline, which, although every steep one will often result in one section of the paving tending to ride up over the other one when expansion takes place. This, of course, is very destructive to the pavement.

My invention to overcome these difliculties, as I prefer to construct it comprises lengths 1 of sheet metal preferably about one-sixteenthinch thick bent to form a relatively very'narrow and deep channel which is inverted so that the bottom of the channel forms the top 2 which is preferably substan tially semi-circular as this formation of the bottom of the channel is found to better maintain the sides 3 parallel.

This channel is somewhat wider inside than the thickness of the strip 4 that is to be held by it, so that the strip is very readily inserted. As above alluded to, the strips are generally somewhat curved or bent in various directions'when they reach the paving site, and these slight curvatures may be depended upon to cause parts 5 of opposite sides of the strip to engage with the inner sides of the channel, as is indicated-in Fig 3. Thus,

sufiicient frictional contact of the strip with the insides of the channel will be rovided to hold the strip in the channel W en it is inverted in the position shown in the draw- 1n Tear the end of each channel or strip 1, I prefer to out a slot 6 down 'through'the top of the metal and to fasten a handle 7 to the top of the metal near each slot. Also, .as shown on one of the lengths in Fig. 1, there may be plugs 8 to close the slots 6 and these plugs may be fastened by chains 9 to the metals or channels so as not to be lost when the parts are handled. These plugs are detachable and can be made of such lengths as to fit downupon the top of, the joint strip (Fig. 4) so as to further hold the joint strip down upon the sub-grade and prevent its rising due to buoyancy in contact with the fluid concrete, should such contact occur, as

in Fig. 2. Also each length may have fixed to one side near-one enda cleat 10 which will overlap the end part of the next adjacent length causing them to be properly alined.

Thus or similarly constructed, the channels or metals 1 are turned over with their open bottoms accessible, and through these bottoms are inserted the joint stripst and then the channels'are placed in alinement 'across the sub-grade 1 1 with their lower edges and the lower edges of thejoint strips 4; resting onthe sub-grade. Suitable stakes 12 are driven at intervalsin the sub-grade against one or both sides of the line of channels to maintain the channels in upright,

position until the concrete 13 and 14 is poured in on both sides of the line of channels. Where the plugs 8 are provided, these are inserted in the slots 6 to guard against pouring any concrete down inside the channels, as this will tend to hinder withdrawal of the channels from the strips in the succ'eeding steps of the operation. .After the concrete 13 and 14 is poured on both-sides of the line of channels, the channels may be lifted out by grasping the handles 7 while pressing on the tops of the joint strips by means of a slender instrument inserted through the slots 6; the plugs '8, of course, being removed for this purpose. The stakes 12 are also pulled out, whereupon the still fluid concrete flows against the joint strips simultaneously on both sideswithout tilting the strips either way. Thus, the strips are properly positioned in the pavement with the concrete abutting them closely on both sides as is required.

In the modification shown in Fig. 2, the sides 3 of the channels 1' have recesses 15 cut in'them at intervals extending up from the bottom edges of the channel sides so that the concrete 13 and 14 is allowed to flow directly against the opposite sides of the joint strips 4 for about the extent of each one'of these recesses 15, Thus, the

concrete already hugging the strips closely on both sides of their lower arts at intervals is adapted to hold the strips down when the channels are removed; this effect being addedto that of the pressure through the sjender instrument inserted through the s ot 6.

In the modificationlshown in Fig. 5, in-

tion of this modified construction is the same as in the preceding example, the chief difference being that it 1s somewhat heavier and more substantial.

It will be understood that other modificati'ons of my invention are possible without departure from the scope and spirit of the following claims:.

a 1. A joint-strip-laying device comprising an inverted channel to contain the strip while paving'material is being laid on opposite sides thereof and adapted to be withdrawn after the paving material is laid, each channel having an extension from its end at one side to overlap an adjacent channel whereby aid channels are held in alinement.

2. A joint-strip-laying device comprising an inverted channel to contain the strip while paving material is being laid on opposite sides thereof and adapted to be withdrawn after the paving material is laid, and having an opening in its upper part for insertion of an instrument against the top of the strip to hold the strip down'when the channel is withdrawn, and a plug fitting in said opening to close it and to hold down the strip while the paving material is being placed on opposite sides of said channel.-

3. A joint-strip-laying device comprising an inverted channel to contain the strip while paving material is bemg laid on op posite sides thereof and adapted to be withdrawn after the paving material is laid, said channel having recesses in its sides up from the lower edges of said sides at intervals therealong whereby the paving material may come into direct contact with opposite sides of the joint strip as held in said channel.

4. A joint-strip-laying device comprising an inverted channel to contain the strip while paving material is being laid on opposite sides thereof and adapted to be withdrawn after the paving material is laid, said channel having recesses in its sides up from the lower edges of said sides at intervals therealong whereby the paving material may come into direct contact with opposite sides of the oint strip as held in said channel, and having an opening in its upper part for insertion of an instrument against the top of the strip tohold the strip down when the channel is withdrawn.

5. A joint-strip-laying device comprising side elements to fiankthe joint strip and hold it in upright position while paving material is placed on both sides of said device, and having a closed top to prevent entrance of the paving-material around the strip be tween said side elements when the paving material is being laid, and having an opening in said top for the insertion of an instrument against the top of the joint strip to hold said strip. down when the device is withdrawn, and a plug for closing'said opening and holding the strip down while said paving material is being laid.

6. The method of laying joint strips in concrete or similar pavements of initial fluid condition which consists in loosely flanking 'said strip by withdrawable means, placing said strip and said means in the position it is to occupy in the pavement with said means in position for being withdrawn upward, then pouring the concrete or the like on opposite sides of said means, and then withdrawing said means and allowing said concrete or the like to flow directly against said joint strip.

HARRY G. INNES.

Witnesses:

CLARENCE PERDEW, IRENE PARKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4391549 *Oct 16, 1980Jul 5, 1983The Tanner CompaniesExpansion joint inserter for continuous curb laying machines
US4875801 *May 11, 1988Oct 24, 1989Anthony MontrymExpansion joint brace and aligner
US5826391 *Nov 15, 1996Oct 27, 1998Underwood; Daniel CharlesConcrete joint and method
US7131624 *Aug 30, 2004Nov 7, 2006Bogrett Blake BLandscape edging form assembly and method
US8556535 *Sep 9, 2008Oct 15, 2013Hazell TrentSystem and method for installing expansion joints
Classifications
U.S. Classification404/89, 249/9, 404/87, 404/107
Cooperative ClassificationE01C23/025