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Publication numberUS1257126 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1918
Filing dateDec 24, 1917
Priority dateDec 24, 1917
Publication numberUS 1257126 A, US 1257126A, US-A-1257126, US1257126 A, US1257126A
InventorsEugene Schneider
Original AssigneeEugene Schneider
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Explosive projectile.
US 1257126 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. SCHNEIDER.

EXPLOSIVE PROJECTILE.

APPLICATION FILED DEC. 24. I912.

Patented Feb. 19, 1918.

EUGENE SCHNEIDEB, OF LE CREUZOT, FRANCE.

EXPLOSIVE PROJECTILE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Feb. 19, 1918.

Application filed December 24, 1917. Serial 110.208,?13.

To all whom it mag concern:

Be it known that I, EUGENE SCHNEIDER,

a citizennof the French. Republic, residing at Le Creuzot, France, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Explosive Projectiles, which is fully set forth in the following specification. I

This invention has for its object to provide an improved explosive projectile of known type formortars and the like guns, comprising a bomb having a larger caliber than the bore of the gun, and therefore remaining outside the bore of the gun during the firing, and having a guiding stem 7 or rod which is inserted into the bore of the un and which at the instant of issuing rom the gun muzzle, engages by means of a tail-piece, a sleeve having steadying vanes which has up to that instant been kept up against the muzzle of the gun by a relatively weak cord or other connection. This improved explosive projectile which I refer to term a"torpedo shell has the following characteristic features:

1. It is constructed in such a manner that it can be fired from rifled mortars (which can also be employed for firing ordinary shells having a caliber corresponding to that of the mortar), so that the improved torpedo shell has the advantage that it allows of the use of rifled mortars which have a greater precision than smooth-bore mortars.

With this object the torpedo shell comprises a driving base piece hav ng the same caliber as the mortar, upon WhlCh sald base -piece (which is fitted ith the usual gas check ring) the explosion of the propelling charge acts and thus propels the entire projectile.

, 2. The driving base plece fitted with a gas check ring, is preferably constructed to act as a shock absorber, and for this purpose it contains a body of plastic material which on being crushed by the explosion is forced into the driving base piece, and

also dovetails itself, as it were, into the end of the guiding stem of the torpedo sh'el'l. Owing to the rigid connection thereby made at the instant of firing between the driv ing base piece and the torpedo shell proper by theautomatic action of the shock absorber, the torpedo shell thereby recelves and retains the same rotational motion asthe driving base piece.

3. A further plastic shock absorber 1s prothe vanedsleeve. 'This further plastic shock absorber is intended to prevent the breakage of the vanes by the impact of the drivmg bolster.

The vaned sleeve and the driving bolster for the u1d1ng sleeve are preferably shaped to fit tlghtly one into the other, and to crush the said further plastic shock absorber between them.

I Thls arrangement assures a complete and r1g1d connection between the torpedo shell, the drivlng base piece'and the steadying vaned sleeve at the instant of the complete e]ection of the projectile.

I A practical example of this invention is llustrated in the accompanying drawings in which:

F gure 1 is a longitudinal section partly in slde elevation of the complete improved torpedo shell shown in position for firing from a mortar; the latter being partly shown in longitudinal section.

Flg. 2 is a cross section on the line XX of Fig. 1; and

Fig. is a view, drawn to a larger scale, of the inner end of the driving base piece, fitted with a gas check ring.

As shown, A is the mortar barrel formed w1th rifling (not shown) whereby it is rendered capable of being used for firing the 1mpr oved torpedo shells or ordinary shells at W111; the said ordinary shells (high-explosive shells or shrapnel) being charged in the usual way, at the breech of the mor- The improved torpedo shell comprises in the usual manner a bomb B fitted with its fuse and having soldered or otherwise fixed to its rear end a neck b for the reception of the guiding stem C which is held in place for instance by means of pins 0. The readily removable connection between the bomb and its guiding stem by simply slipping onand fixing by means of pins, has the advantage of allowing the improved projectile to be taken to pieces for transport.

proper at l to a hook F- fixed on the breech of the mortar.

According to this invention the gases gen-- erated by the propelling charge contained ina cartridge (i, exert their thrust upon the stem 0 of the torpedo shell through the medium of a driving base piece .ll fitted with a gas cheek ring 11. of the usual type. Between the inner end of the driving base piece H and the rear end o of the stem C there is arranged a shock absorber I of lastic material for instance lead. -The drivmg base piece II on being driven forward by the explosion of the propelling charge, crushes the shock absorber which is thereby forced on one side into a. recess 0 provided in the end 0 While on the other side .it dovetails itself as it were into recesses h (Fig. 3) formed in the end of the drivingbase piece H. The driving base piece fitted with the shock absorber I, is thereby converted into one piece, as it were, with the torpedo shell the very commencement of the action of the propelling gases by becoming bodily engaged in the rear part of the neck C, to which it thusimparts its forward and rotating motions; the stem C being guided at its forward portion by the vaned sleeve 1). The latter is taken along in the usual manner by a bolster provided on the stem 0. In the example this holster is constituted by a Wedge-shaped ring J.

According to this invention a further shock absorber s provided on the stem C in front of the driving bolster J. In the example this shock absorber is constituted by a lea len ring K provided at its rear with a coiled cord L serving as an'elastic butter.

The shock absorber K-L is crushed or compressed between the vaned sleeve D and the driving bolster J, which latter becomes jammed at itsconical front 'end into the flaring rear end (Z of the sleeve I). As soon as the vaned sleeve D is'carried along it becomes, as it were, one piece with the stem C. From that moment a. complete and rigid union is established between the torpedo shell (bomb B and guiding stem C), the driving base piece II and the steadying 'vaned' sleeve D.

Having now described my invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is 1. In combination, a stem adapted to extend into a gun and a projectile or bomb supported on said stem outside of the gun, and means normally detached from said stem but supporting the same near the gun muzzle, said means becoming automatically attached to said stem when the gun is fired. 2. In combination, a stem adapted to we ,tend into a gun and a projectile or bomb supported on said stem outside of the gun, and means provided with steadying vanes normally detached from said'stem but supporting the same'near the gun muzzle, said means becoming automatically attached to said stem when the gun is fired.

3. In combination, a bomb or projectile of larger caliber than the bore of the gun for projecting the same, a stem secured to said projectile and extending into the gun, and means normally detached from said stem but supporting the same near the gun muzzle, said means becoming alitomatically attached to said stem when the gun is tired.

4. In combination, a bomb or projectile of larger caliber than the bore of the gun for projecting the same, a stem secured to said projectile and extending into the gun, and means provided with steadying vanes normally detached from said stem but supporting the same near the gun muzzle, said means becoming automatically attached to said stem when the gun is.fircd.

I). In combination, a bomb or projectile of larger caliber than the bore of the gun 6. In combination, a bomb or projectile of larger caliber than the bore of the gun for projecting the -same, a stem secured to said projectile and extending into the gun, a sleeve provided with vanes surrounding said stem near the gun muzzle and supporting said stem, means automatically attaching said sleeve to said stem when the gun is fired, and means normally holding said sleeve against the muzzle of the gun.

7 In combination, a stem adapted to extend into a gun and a projectile or bomb supported on said stem outside of thegun, means normally detached from said stem but supporting the Same near the gun muzzle, said means becoming automatically attached to said stem when the. gun is fired, and a shock-absorber carried by said stem and engaging said means -to prevent breakage of the same.

8. In combination, a stem adapted to extend into a gun and a projectile. or bomb supported on said stem outside of the gun, means provided with steadying vanes normally detached from said stem, said means becoming automatically attached to said stem when the gun is fired, and a shock-absorber carried by said stem and engaging said means to prevent breakage of said vanes. v

9. In combination, a stem adapted to extend into a gun and a projectile or bomb supported on said stem outside of the gun, a vaned sleeve surrounding said stem near the muzzle of the gun, a wedge-shaped member secured to said stem and adapted Ill to be driven into said sleeve, and a shockabsorber arranged in front of said member.

10. In combination, a stem adapted to extend into a gun and a projectile or bomb supported on said stem outside of the gun, a vaned sleeve surrounding said stem near the muzzle of the gun, a wed e-shaped member secured to said stem an adapted to be driven into said sleeve, and a shockabsorber arranged in front of said member;i

- said shock-absorber comprising .a ring an an elastic element.

11. In combination, a stem adapted to extend into a gun and a projectile or bomb supported on said stem outside of the gun,

means supporting said stem near the gun muzzle, and a base piece coo erating with said stem within the 'gun an being of the same caliber as the gun.

' tween the base piece and stem an the 12. In combination, a stem adapted to extend into a gun and a projectile or bomb supported on said stem outside of the gun, a base iece cooperating with said stem within t e gun and bein of the same caliber" as the gun, and shoe -absorbing means between said base piece and stem.

13. In combination, a stem adapted to extend into a gun and a projectile or bomb supported on said stem, a base piece having its movement influenced by the rifling of the gun and means automatically connectin said base piece and stem. 4

14. n combination, ,a stem adapted to ex- 1 tend into 'a gun and a projectile or bomb by the rifling of the gun, shock-absorbing means arranged between said base iece and stem, and means whereby said shoc -absorbing-means automatically connects said base piece and stem when the gun is fired so that the movement of the base piece, stem and projectile is influenced bythe gun rifling.

15. In combination, a stem adapted to extend'into a gun and a projectile or bomb supported on said stem, a base piece havin its movement influenced b the riflin 0 the gun, and a plastic b0 y arran ed beautomatically connecting said parts when the gun is fired.

16. In combination, a stem adapted to extend into a gun and a projectile or bomb supported on said stem, a base piece havin its movement influenced by the rifling o n, said stem and base piece bein provide with recesses, and a plastic bo y arranged between said base piece and stem and being forced into said recesses when the caliber as the gun 17. In a device of the character described, a cartridge for a gun, a base piece in juxtaposition to said cartridge, a stem coiiperatmg with said base piece, and a bomb or proiectile removablfy secured to the end of sa1 stem outside 0 the gun.

18. In a device of the character described, a cartridge for a gun, a base piece in 'uxtaposition to said cartridge and provide with a gas-check ring, the movement of said base piece being controlled by the rifling of the gun, a stem having one end in juxtaposition to said base piece, means 'forautomatically securin 'said stem and base piece together,

- .20. In a device ofthe character described,

a stem adapted to roject into a gun provided with rifling, a bomb or pro'ectile carried by said stem outside of sai gun, and means whereby said stem. and ,projectile are automatically made subject to the gun rifling when the n is fired.

21. In a device of the c aracter described, a bomb or projectile provided with a rearwardly-extending sleeve, a stem having one end adapted to extend into the muzzle of a gun and the other end into said sleeve, and means for readily attaching and detaching said bomb or projectile to and from said sleeve.

22. In combination, a stem adapted to extend into a gun and a projectile or bomb supported on said stem outside of the gun, mgialns rovided with steadying vanes norm becol iling automatically attached to said stem when the gun is fired, a shock-absorber carried by said stem and engaging said means to prevent breakage o sa1 vanes, a base piece 006 erating with said stem within the gun an being of the same and shock-absorbing means between said base ieceand stem.

In testimony whereof have signed this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

CHAS. P. Pnnssnr, Arman Mosmcxmz.

etached from said stem, said means

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2421752 *Feb 22, 1943Jun 10, 1947Eureka Williams CorpRocket projectile
US2426239 *Dec 28, 1942Aug 26, 1947Renner Henry MRocket shell
US2480927 *Mar 16, 1944Sep 6, 1949Raymonde Briggs HopkinsAerial torpedo
US2521655 *Dec 18, 1945Sep 5, 1950Charles SchermulyTail or bridle for rockets
US2870676 *Jun 6, 1952Jan 27, 1959Daly Thomas AShearing device for cables
US3125957 *Feb 23, 1962Mar 24, 1964 lipinski
US3208345 *Jan 29, 1964Sep 28, 1965Thompson Emil WAnti-spin device
US3238875 *Apr 26, 1963Mar 8, 1966Dynamit Nobel AgRocket shell construction
US3292879 *Jun 25, 1965Dec 20, 1966Canrad Prec Ind IncProjectile with stabilizing surfaces
US3779128 *Apr 25, 1972Dec 18, 1973Pelaez PMortar with electro-magnetic retaining coil
US3861272 *Dec 13, 1972Jan 21, 1975Bayern Chemie Gmbh FlugchemieAmmunition comprising a launcher tube and a reaction-driven missile
US4210082 *Jul 30, 1971Jul 1, 1980The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmySub projectile or flechette launch system
US4505179 *Aug 2, 1982Mar 19, 1985Walker Limited PartnershipLine throwing device
US4708304 *Dec 27, 1985Nov 24, 1987General Dynamics, Pomona DivisionRing-wing
US5005781 *Mar 27, 1989Apr 9, 1991Hughes Aircraft CompanyIn-flight reconfigurable missile construction
US5546863 *Dec 22, 1994Aug 20, 1996O. F. Mossberg & Sons, Inc.Line carrying projectile
Classifications
U.S. Classification244/3.26, 244/3.3, 102/483
Cooperative ClassificationF42B10/12