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Publication numberUS1259210 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 12, 1918
Filing dateJun 26, 1908
Priority dateJun 26, 1908
Publication numberUS 1259210 A, US 1259210A, US-A-1259210, US1259210 A, US1259210A
InventorsNorris Elmore Clark
Original AssigneeNorris Elmore Clark
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Expanded-metal frame.
US 1259210 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N. E. CLARK.

EXPANDED METAL FRAME.

APPLICATION FILED JUNE 26.1908.

1 ,259,21 0. Patented Mar. 12, 1918.

Fig; i

Fig. 2

1); W I /4 Norris Elmore Clark. q 0; I D

NORRIS ELMORE CLARK, OF PLAINVILLE, CONNECTICUT.

EXPANDED-METAL FRAME.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Mar. 12, 1918.

Application filed June 26, 1908. Serial No. 440,544.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Norms ELMORE CLARK, a citizen of the United States, residing at Plainville, in the county of Hartford and State of Connecticut, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Expanded-Metal Frames, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to improvements in framework and particularly for open-work or ventilating screens, guards, partitions, doors, shelves and panels.

The main object is to form such a structure of expanded metal with a border which will give added strength and rigidity and afford convenient means of supporting and holding it in place. I have also sought to construct the framework cheaply and light in weight although strong. Preferably the parts are united or finished so as to leave no pockets likely to catch or hold any foreign particles which might render it unsanitary.

In its simplest form the invention comprises a sheet of expanded metal fabric having its edges turned at right angles and a border of sheet metal inclosing and holding the edges of the fabric. The details are illustrated in the accompanying single sheet of drawings.

Figure 1, is a view of the frame which may be considered as a vertical projection of a window guard or a horizontal projection of a shell. The particular use of the frame is immaterial.

Fig. 2, is an edge view of the same.

Fig. 3, is a sectional view of the border showing the preferred method of holding the fabric.

Fig. 4, shows a section of a simplified form of border.

Fig. 5, is a fragmentary view of a corner of the border.

Fig. 6, is a perspective view of a corner fragment of the expanded metal fabric showin the bent edges.

Fig. 5, is a fragmentary detail of the border before assembling.

Fig. 8, is a sectional view showing a modified form of border.

' The fabric is preferably flat expanded metal which consists of a series of strips such as 1, 2. 3 and 4 integrally connected at intervals in stag ered arrangement and bent all in a common ane so as to form openings such as 5, 6 an 7. The edges of t e sheet are turned or bent at right angles to. the plane of the sheet. The turned-over portions of the strips form lugs such as 8, 9, 10 and 11 which are locked into the border as will be hereinafter understood.

The border is preferably composed of. a single strip of sheet metal bent to conform to the outline of the fabric and folded'so as to grip the edges. The part 12 forms the outer wall of the border and the part 13 is bent over to form the outer flange. The bend 14 fits the tips of the lugs such as 8, 9, 10 and 11. The inner wall 15 incloses the lugs, while the inner flange 16 extends along the inner face of the fabric to correspond with the outer flange 13.

The inner and outer walls 12 and 15 being at right angles to the plane of the fabric give great stiffness to the framework even with light gage material. Preferably the strip to form the border is cut away as at 17 and 18 so as to permit the strip to be more easily and neatly bent at the corners. Where the two ends of the strip come together I cut away the flanges and leave the main wall protruding in the form of a tongue 19 (see Fig. 5) which is bent around inside the abutting wall. The remaining portion of the strip is bent in over the bent edges of the fabric to form the inner wall 15 and the inner flange 16 (see Fig. 3). The flange 13 may be bent over either before the outer wall is bent to the outline of the fabric or afterward. Preferably the joints are all soldered after assembling or the framework may be tinned. Ineither case the little pockets such as 20 (Fig. 3) may be filled with tin, solder, paint or other suitable material or the flanges 13 and 16 may be indented between the strips 1, 2, 3, etc. It is best to have all the lugs such as 8, 9, 10 and 11 securely fastened in the border.

A cheaper construction but one suitable for many uses is shown in section in Fig. 4. This is the same as in Fig. 3 except that the inner flange 16 is omitted and the inner wall 15 is brought down close against the inner face of the fabric. This is substantially as stiff to resist pressure at right angles to the border of the framework as the border of Fig. 3. Pressure on the fabric however tends to draw in the sides and the absence of the inner flange 16 of Fig. 3 leaves this border of Fig. 4 somewhat less rigid than the other.

The border of Fig. 8 omits both flanges and the walls 12 and 15 may be soldered,

welded, or otherwise suitably secured together or to the fabric so as to inclose the lugs such as 10. This is strong and rigid when made of heavy materia and will answer many purposes.

What I claim is:

1. An open-work frame construction comprising a panel consisting of a series of strands. integrally connected together by bonds at intervals in staggered arrangement so as to form intersecting diagonals, the ends of the strands formin divergent lugs disposed at substantially rig t angles to the body of the panel about its entire periphery and a border strip having inner and outer walls embracing sald lugs and extending at substantially right angles to the plane of said panel and a reinforcing and stiffening flange integral with one of said walls and lying against one face of said panel.

2. A framework comprising an expanded metal fabric bent over at the edges and a border strip having outer and inner walls at right angles to the plane of the fabric embracing the-bent over edges and a. flange held against the body of the fabric and a tongue at one end of the strip locked between the walls at the other end of the strip.

3. A framework comprising a sheet of expanded metal fabric bent up at the edges to provide anchoring lugs extending at an angle to the plane of the expanded'fabric and a border strip having outer and inner walls at right angles to the plane of the fabric embracing the bent up anchoring lugs at the edges of the fabric and permanently securing the lugs therebetween.

4. A framework comprising an expanded metal fabric having its entire periphery bent at an angle from the genera plane of the fabric and a border strip having inner and outer walls bent to embrace said periphery and a tongue at one end embraced by said walls. 1

5. A framework comprising an expanded metal. fabric having its edges bent over at a substantial angle, a border strip composed of inner and outer walls embracing said edge and inner and outer flanges, the outer wall being in one piece having a tongue at one end held between said walls, said inner wall and flanges being in the form of independently bendable portions folded over after the outer wall is in place.

6. A framework comprising an expanded metal fabric having its edges bent over at right angles and a one-piece border strip comprisin an outer wall portion at right angles thereto terminating in a tongue at one end, independently bendable inner wall portions integral with the outer wall and folded over inside the edges of the fabric, said tongue being held between the opposite end of the outer wall and its corresponding inner wall.

NORRIS ELMORE CLARK.

Witnesses: v

' A. V. BRocK,

D. G. CLARK.

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US9377205 *Dec 28, 2011Jun 28, 2016General Electric CompanyOven rack
US20130118470 *May 16, 2013General Electric CompanyMetal rack for an oven appliance
US20130118475 *May 16, 2013General Electric CompanyMetal rack for an oven appliance
US20130167828 *Dec 28, 2011Jul 4, 2013Daniel Joseph TriceOven rack
US20140239793 *Feb 25, 2013Aug 28, 2014General Electric CompanyShelf support assembly for a ribbed appliance cavity
US20140283814 *Mar 20, 2013Sep 25, 2014General Electric CompanyAppliance shelving system
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/799.1, 211/153, 160/DIG.700, D25/142, 52/800.12
Cooperative ClassificationY10S160/07, E04C2/08, E04F15/02405