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Publication numberUS1260570 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1918
Filing dateMar 6, 1917
Priority dateMar 6, 1917
Publication numberUS 1260570 A, US 1260570A, US-A-1260570, US1260570 A, US1260570A
InventorsCharles F Pease
Original AssigneePease C F Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of and apparatus for drying coated paper.
US 1260570 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C F. PEASE.

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR DRYING COATED PAPER.

APPLICATION FILED MAR. 6.19)?- l,%60,570. Patented Mar. 26, 1918.

6 SHEETS-SHEET l- C. F. PEASE.

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR DRYING COATED PAPER.

APPLICATION FILED MAR. s. 19H.

1,260,57U. Patented Mar. 26,1918.

6 SHEETSSHEET 2.

C. F. PEASE.

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR DRYING COATED PAPER.

APPLICATION FILED MAR. 6. Hill.

Patented Mar. 26, 1918.

6 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

C. F. PEASE.

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR DRYING COATED PAPER.

APPLICATION FILED MAR. 6.191].

Patented Mar. 26

SHEEI 4.

5 SHEETS- I l|1|| I I---1 ||1|l1- C. F. PEASE.

METHOD OF'AND APPARATUS FOR DRYING COATED PAPER.

APPLlCATlON FILED MAR. 6. 1911.

LZGQWU. Patented Mar. 26, 1918.

6 SHEETSSHEET 5.

o o o C. F. PEASE.

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR DRYING COATED PAPER.

APPLICATION FILED MAR. s. 1911.

1,260,570 Patented Mar. 26, 1918.

-6 SHEETS-SHEET 6.

Chicago, in the county of Cook and CHARLES H. PEASE, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO THE CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS.

METHOD OF, AND APPARATUS FOR DRYING COATED PAPER.

To all whom it may concern:

-Be it known that I, CHARLES F. PEAsE, a citizen of the United States, residin at tate of Illinois, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in-Methods of and Apparatusfor Drying Coated Paper, of which the following is a full, clear, concise, and

' exact description.

This invention relates to a method of and apparatus *for drying paper and particularly blue print paper after the same has.

' I been coated with a suitable sensitizing compound.

Heretofore, paper of this kind, after it has been coated with the usual sensitizing solution, has been dried in a medium containing aconsiderable amount of moisture,

which hasinjurlous effects upon the quality of the paperand also materially shortens the period within which it can be commer cially used; In other words, the finished paper as produced by the methods now in common use, deteriorates rapidly, due to the ineffective drying thereof.

It i an important-object of the present invention therefore, to provide an improved method of treating the paper after the same has been coated whereby substantiall all moisture is effectively removed there rom, thereby greatly increasing the life and quality of the paper.

Another object of the resides in the provision o ratus for carrying into effect the above method and wherein said paper is passed through a plurality of chambers to thorou hly dry the same.

ther object and advantages will be apparent from the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein two embodiments of the inventionzare shown. It will be readily understood however, thatthe drawings are for purposes of illustration only, and not as defining the limits of the invention.

Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view of the invention.

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of a drying cabinet constructed in accordance .with the resent invention.

- Fig. 3 15 5 transverse section-taken on the liire 33 of Fig. 2. I

Fig. 4. is a transverse setion'taken on the resent invention a sultable appaas line H of Fig.2

Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed llfliarch 6, 1917. Serial N 0. 152,519.

Patented Mai. as, rare.

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken on the line 55 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 6 is a detail view.

Fig. 7 is a diagrammatic view of a modified form of the invention; and

C. F. PEASE COMPANY, OF

Fig. 8 is a sectional view taken on the line 88 of Fig. 7

The drying cabinet is shown in the drawings at 10, and is supported on,- suitable uprights 11, mounted on the standards 12. The drying cabinet is preferabl provided with a plurality of drylng cham ers 13, 14, throu h the former of which is circulated through the latter of which is circulated hot air. The term combustion heat is herein used to designateatmospheric 'air which has been heated by direct contact with the combustion gases of an open flame.

a The drying cabinet 10 is shown provide with a suitable baflie plate 15 positioned within the chamber 13, said bafile plate be ing adapted to prevent the combustion heat which is circulated through said chamber from passing into the chamber 14. This baffle plate 15 also serves to guide the combustion heat after it has been passed through the chamber 13, out through the outlet 16. Mounted within the entrance chamber 17 of the drying cabinet 10 is shown a bank of suitable heating tubes 18, at the lower end of which is provided an open flame heater 19. These heating tubes 18 are what 1s herein termed combustion heat, and

shown open at both ends to permit of the pasage of air over the flame 19 and upward through said tubes and into the combustion heat chamber 13. Within the base of the drying cabinet 10, there is another set of open flame heaters 20, the flames from which are adapted to contact with the heatin chamber 21, through which air is circulated by means 'of a suitable circulating fan 22 adapted to be driven by a motor 23 or any other suitable means. The base plate 24 of the heating chamber 21 is preferably corrugated to permit of its expansion and contraction, due to the changes in temperature toawhich it is subjected. Suitable openings 25-are provided in the plate positioned beneath the heaters 20'to permit of. the passa e of atmospheric air ov'e'rsaid heaters. ThlS air, after it has been passed over the heaters, is conducted through a suitable conduit 26, which is shown surrounding the heating chamber 21, passes through suitable ports 27 stantially over the entire width of the dry-- ing 36 is shown provided in the return pipeand out through the outlet 28 intothe entrance chamber 17, where it is conducted into the combustion heat chamber 13 and through the outlet 16. Leading from the fan 22 is a suitable conduit 29, through which air is fed to the heating chamber 21.

' This air, after it has been thus heated, passes into the transverse chamber 31, from whence it is forced into the hot air chamber 14 through suitable elongated slotted openings 32. Positioned within the hot air chamber 14 is shown a return header 33 provided with an elongated slot 34 which extends subing cabinet 10. This return header is connected by a suitable return pipe 35 with the fan 22, the operation of said fan 22 acting to producea suction within the return pipe and header. It will thus be seen that the air within the chamber 14 after the same has been completely circulated therethrough,

is drawn into. the header 33 and throughthe return (pipe 35 to the fan 22, said fan causing sai air to again circulate through the various conduits to the hot air chamber as just described. A suitable intake open- 35 at the point adjacent the fan housing 37. Through this opening, fresh air is drawn into the circulatmg system and mixed with the heated air, as it is forced therethrougli.

- It will be noted from the construction just described, that the hot air which is used in connection with the present method is kept in continuous circulation. The combustion heat chamber 13 and the hot air chamber 14 are separated by a suitable corrugated plate 38. J

The transverse chamber 31 is shown provided with a suitable outlet nozzle 39 'exfro tending into the entrance chamber 17 directly above the combustion heat outlet 28.

The air forced through this n0zzle'39. pro-- duces a suction efi'ect on the combustion heat within the outlet 28, tending to draw the same upward and into the entrance chamber 17. This construction produces a more elfecti've circulation of the combustion heat through the'conduit 26 and eliminates g a definite amount of the air in the chamber- 14, which'isreplaced by fresh air thereby preventing the circulating. air om becomingmoist.

The uncoated paper is mountedat 40 and is own passing over suitable rollers, 41

whi v act-taooat paper with the usual income sensitizing solution, said solution being conmounted in the bracket 43, said bracket being vertically adjustable along the rod 44. Also mounted in this bracket 43 is shown a scraping'element 45 which is adapted to bear against the paper as it is passed over said rollers to remove therefrom any sur plus coating; After the paper has thus been scraped, it is passed through atmospheric air under ordinary conditions, and then through the entrance chamber 17 of the drying cabinet 10, the combined combustion heat and the hot air from the outlets 28 and 39 being forced into contact with the uncoated side of the said paper, as the same is thus being passed through said entrance chamber 17. The paper is then passed over the roller 46 and through the chamber 13, where it is subjected to the combustion heat supplied to said chamber bythe bank of.

heaters 18. After passingthrough the combustion heat chamber 13, the'paper is passed in a zig-zag path over rollers 47, through the hot air chamber 14, where substantially all of the moisture in said paper is effectively removed. After the paper has thus been treated, it is passed out through the outlet 48 and rolled about a suitable roller 49.

It will be noted from Fig. 3 of the drawings, that the roller-s47, which are mounted adjacent to the transverse chamber 31, are positioned between the elongated slotted openings 32. Thus the hot air emitted from said elongated slotted openings 32-contacts with the coated surface of the paper as th same is fed toward the chamber 17, and also as it is fed'away from said chamber 17. The rollers 47 are shown mounted in suitable brackets .50 secured to'the uprights 11. Adjustable buldger rods '51 are shown mounted in suitable brackets. 52 also supported on the uprights 11, said buldger rods being adapted to bear against the surface of the paper as shown, to hold the same" taut, as itis passed over the various rollers.

and to prevent any creasing of the paper. The drying cabinet 10 is preferably provided with a plurality of openings 53 shown provided with doors 54 through which access may be had to t the interior of said cabinet for the purpose of repairing any of the parts or for adjusting the buldger.

rods.

.InFigs. 7 and 8 is illustrated a slightly modified form of the invention, wherein-the bank of heating tubes 18 is dispensed with, the combustion heat from the heaters 20 being conducted through the conduit 55,

which is substantially similar to the corresponding conduit 26 shown in the preferred em d men f. the in ent n, tothe con duits 59 shown connecting with said conduit 55 at each side of the forward end thereof.

These conduits 56 pass around the transrear of said transverse chamber 31, but sutficiently spaced therefrom to provide an entrance chamber 58 similar to the one shown and described in connection with the pre-' ferred embodiment. From this chamber 57 the combustion heat is conducted upwardly into the chamber 13 through a suitable outlet nozzle 59. The suction efiect in this construction is produced by the formation of a sub-chamber 60 within the chamber 57, said sub-chamber 60 being supplied with hot air from the heating chamber 21 by means of suitable bypasses 61 positioned on either side of the transverse chamber 31 and connecting saidchamber with said sub-chamher. The sub-chamber 60 is shown provided with a suitable outlet nozzle 62 through which the air thus bypassed is forced, and by means of which the desired suction efi'ect upon the combustion heat within the chamber 57 is effected. In other respects, this embodiment of the invention is substantially similar to the preferred construction as illustrated in the other figures of the drawmgs.

Although blue print paper has been referred to for convenience, the invention is applicable also to the dryin of white print paper ,or other paper or fabric. The utilization of combustion heat insures efliclency of operation where open flame heaters are qemployed, as in the construction illustrated hereln. It will be understood, however, that heat from any source may be used. It' 1s further apparent that various other changes 1 and modification may be made in the construction herein illustrated, without departing from the spirit of the invention as expressedin the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. The improved method of drying coated paper which consists in first passing sald paper through a chamber contamlng combustion gases and then passing the same through a chamber containing circulating hot air.

2. The improved method of drying coated paper which consists in first passing said paper through a chamber containing combustion gases and hot air and then passing the same through a chamber containing circulating hot air.

3. The improved method of drying sensitized paper which consists in firstsubjecting the uncoated surface of said paper to a current of combustion gases and hot air, then subjecting the coated surface of Said paper to acurrent of combustion gases and later passing said paper through a chambe containing circulating hot air.

4:. The improved method of drying blue print paper which consists in first passing the same through atmospheric air at ordinary temperature, then subjecting the uncoated surface of said paper to a, current of combustion gases and hot air, then subjecting the coated surface of said paper to a current of combustion gases and later passng said paper through a chamber containng hot air.

5. A drier'of the type described, comprising a plurality of drying chambers,

means for supplying one of said chambers with combustion gases and means for supplying the other of said chambers with hot air.

6. A drier of the type described comprising a plurality of' drying chambers, means for supplying one of said chambers with combustion gases, means for supplying the other of said chambers with hot a1r. and

means for continuously circulating said hot a1r.

7. A drier of the type. described, comprising an entrance chamber, a combustion gases chamber, and .a hot air chamber, a bank of heating tubes positioned within said entrance chamber and communicating with said combustion gases chamber, an air'heating chamber, a plurality of heaters therefor, a combustion gases conduit surround-v ing said hot a1r heatmg chamber, said con:

duit communicating with said entrance chamber, a transverse chamber communicat- 'ingwith said hot air chamber and with said hot air heating chamber, said trans- -verse chamber being provided with means adapted to increase the How of combustion gasesthrough said conduit. 8. A drier of the type described, comprising an entrance chamber, a combustion gases chamber, and ahot air chamber, a bank of heating tubes positioned within said entrance chamber and communicating with said combustion gases chamber, an air heating chamber, a plurality of heaters therefor,

and means for conducting a strip of paper in a zig-zag path through certain of sai chambers to thereby dry thesame. w 9. In a drier of the class described, an

entrance chamber, a combustion gases cham her, and a hot air chamber, a bank of heating tubes positioned in said entrance chamher at one side thereof, a plurality of 'outi lets o the other side thereof, one of said outlets being so positioned with relation to the other that the emission of gases therefrom produces a suction efiect on the gases emitted from the other.

10. In a drier of the type described,--an entrance chamber, a combustion gases conduit mounted in the base of said er and plurality of rollers mounted on said uprights and adjacent said transverse chamber.

12. A device ofthe type described, comprising a plurality of uprights, a drying cabinet mounted thereon, a hot air chamber within said cabinet, a transverse chamber positioned at one end of said dryair chamher and between two of said uprights, said transverse chamberbeing provided with a plurality of elongated slotted ,openings adapted to emit a drying medium into said hot air chamber, and a plurality of rollers mounted on said uprights, adjacent said transverse chamber and between certain of said elongated openings.

13. A drier of the type described, com

prising an entrance for the paper to be dried, a combustion gases conduit, a hot air conduit, each of said conduits having an outlet into said entrance and means whereby the gases emitted from one of said outlets tends to increase the discharge of gases from the other of said outlets.

1.4. drier of the type described, comprising a plurality of outlets, and means whereby the gases emitted from one of said outlets tends .to increase the discharge of gases fromthe other of said outlets, said gases acting as a drying medium for the material. being fed through said drier. v 15. In a device of the type described, a drier, means for introducing a strip of paper into (said drier and means for dlrecting a current of combustion gases' and hot air against said strip of paper as the same enters said drier. v

16. In a drier of the type described, means ma am for directing a current .of combustion gases and dry air against a strip of paper as the same enters said drier, and means whereby the discharge of one of said gases into con-' tact with said paper acts to increase the discharge of the other of said gases into contact therewith. h

17. A drier of the type described,com prising-a plurality of drying chambers, an air heating chamber communicating with one of said drying chambers, and a combustion gases conduit communicating with the other of said chambers, said air heating chamber being positioned within said combustion gases conduit.

18. Apparatus for drying sensitized paper,

comprising a plurality of drying chambers,

means for supplying heat to one of said chambers to efiect an initial drying of said paper, means for supplying a heated atmos phere to another of said chambers and causing it to move toward the upper part there 0nd chamber arranged at opposite ends thereof, whereby said paper may travel back and forth over said rollers from the top to the bottom of said chamber in a plurality of' substantially horizontal spans, said sec- 0nd chamber having an inlet at one end. thereof and having an outlet at the other end near the top, and-means for causing a heated atmosphere to pass through said chamber from said inlet to said outlet whereby the moisture from said paper is carried upwardly as said paper descends.

In witness whereof, I hereunto subscribe.

my name this 7th day of February A; D. 1917.

. CHARLES r. rnasn.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2456301 *Sep 14, 1943Dec 14, 1948United Merchants & MfgProcess and apparatus for drying textiles
US2731732 *May 19, 1953Jan 24, 1956Crown Zellerbach CorpApparatus and method for setting and drying moisture settable ink
US6264791Oct 25, 1999Jul 24, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Flash curing of fibrous webs treated with polymeric reactive compounds
US6322665Oct 25, 1999Nov 27, 2001Kimberly-Clark CorporationReactive compounds to fibrous webs
US6610174Jun 21, 2001Aug 26, 2003Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Patterned application of polymeric reactive compounds to fibrous webs
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/462, 432/176, 432/8, 432/94, 34/466, 432/133, 427/382
Cooperative ClassificationB24D11/005, F26B3/283