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Publication numberUS1262164 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1918
Filing dateOct 7, 1916
Priority dateOct 7, 1916
Publication numberUS 1262164 A, US 1262164A, US-A-1262164, US1262164 A, US1262164A
InventorsGeorge A Bertsch
Original AssigneeGeorge A Bertsch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary reversible motor.
US 1262164 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. A. BERTSCH.

ROTARY REVERSIBLE MOTOR.

APPLICATION FILED OCT. 7. ms.

' 1362316 Patented Apr. 9,1918.

4 SHEE TSSHEET I.

'e. A. BERTSCH. ROTARY REVERSIBLE MOTOR.

APPLICATION FILED OCT. 7,1916. 1,26%,1 6%. Patented Apr. 9, 1918.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

amen/tow e. A. BE RTSCH.

ROTARY REVERSIBLE MOTOR.

Patented Apr. 9, 1918.

4 SHEETS SHEET 3- Smwwtoz I G'flIBCf'ZSCZ G. A. BERTSCH.

ROTARY REVERSIBLE MOTOR. APPLICATION FILED OCT-1. 1915.

SHEET 4.

Patented Apr. 9

f1 SHEETS lZZ Ema-

07 'maj GEORGE A. IBERTSCI-I, OF PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND.

ROTARY REVERSIBLE IIEOTOR.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Apr. 9, 1918.

Application filed October 7, 1916. Serial No. 124,320.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Gnonon A. Bnn'rson, a citizen of the United States, residing at Providence, in the county of Providence and State of Rhode Island, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in R0- tary Revers'ble Motors; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in rotary reversible motors and the principal object of the invention is to provide a motor from which the maximum power is obtained from a minimum consumption of fuel.

A further object of the invention is to provide a device in which the flow of the expending gas may be directed against the piston heads of the rotor in such a manner as to drive the same in a. forward or reverse direction.

The invention has for another object to provide a rotor arranged to operate within the motor casing or stator which is provided with a pair of laterally extending annular ribs which project from opposite sides of the rotor which ribs are cutaway for portions of their length to allow for the turning of the piston heads against which the gases are directed and impinge.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a means for turning the piston heads so they extend in a plane with the rib at a time when they are passing between the portions of the directing vane which is rockably mounted so as to change the direction of flow of the gas through the device.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a novel means for holding the rockable vane in its various positions.

A still further object of the invention resides in the provision of a novel means for mounting the pistons in the rotors and to balance the same so as to prevent endwise movement and yet allow each of the pistons sufficient resiliency to give when pressure is applied to their outer ends thereby avoiding danger of injury thereto.

With these and other objects in view the invention consists in the novel combination and arrangement of parts which will be fully set forth in the following specification and accompanying drawmgs, in which Figure l is an end elevation of the motor illustrating the drive shaft and a portion-of the exhaust manifold in section.

Fig. 2 is a vertical longitudinal sectional view of the motor showing the same on an enlarged scale to more clearly illustrate the details of construction.

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view taken on line 4% of Fig. 2 and showing the device on a reduced scale. v

Fig. 4c is a vertical sectional view on line 55 of F ig. 2.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged detail longitudinal sectional view through a fragment of the rotor and illustrating the detail construction of the piston.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged detail View partly in section of the piston operating mechanism.

Fig. 7 is a detail view of one of the elements of the piston.

Referring more particularly to the drawings the motor is generically indicated by the numeral 1. The fuel or operating gas of the motor is fed thereto through a manifold 3, having a reduced portion 26 and a branch or elbow pipe 27 which conducts the gases to the operating chambers within the motor where'they expand against the heads of the rotor and operate the motor, from which the power i transmitted tlllOuoh th dr ve shaft 4. a

The stator of the motor comprises two separate body sections designated respectively by the numerals 43 and 44-. The body 48 includes a hub 45 having extending radially therefrom an annular wall 46 which is positioned near the inner end but spaced therefrom for a short distance. The outer edge of the wall is formed with an annularly extending enlarged portion 4L7 having formed therein an annular passage 48 forming the inlet passage through which the expanding gases enter the device. An annular groove 49 is formed in the inner face of the enlargement 47 and forms the chamber in which the pistons of the rotor operate. A suitable inwardly extending flange 49 is formed at the extreme perip cry of the enlargement 47 and cooperates with a similar ing outwardly from said wall at right angles with relation'thereto is an annular flange or rib 92 the side faces of which incline toward the outer edge of said rib and a similar rib 93 is formed on the wall in the same plane with the rib 92. These ribs are adapted to travel in the passages 49 and 56 respectively and each of said ribs is formed at spaced intervals throughout its length with the openings 941 in which the piston heads are operable. Formed at spaced intervals within the rotor are suitable pockets 95 for the accommodation of the pistons and the operating mechanism for said pistons. In order to insure the proper circulation of the cooling fluid through the device, the inner terminals of the passages 91 communicate with a bore 96 in the shaft and a pipe 97 which is of considerably less diameter than the bore 96 extends axially through said bore and communicates at its inner end with a reduced bore 98 which in turn is in communication with the radial passages 99, the outer ends of which are in communication with the passages 91. It will thus be seen that the cool water flowing into the pipe 97 will be conveyed through the bore 98 and radial passages 99 into the passages 91 where it will circulate against the wallof the passages 91 and after becoming heated pass into the bore 96 where it is conveyed to a suitable cooling coil or radiator designated in the diagram by the numeral 100. A suitable cover plate 101 is provided for the side of the rotor on which the wall 88 is formed so as to complete the house thereby providing the necessary lubricating space not subject to the pressure of the gases for the operation of the mechanism within the rotor. The wall 88 is formed at spaced intervals with openings 102 which aline with openings 103 formed in the wall 90 and these openings are arranged to communicate with the pockets 95 hereinbeiore described, The openings 102 and 103 above referred to are adapted to accommodate the pistons which will be more fully hereinafter described.

The pistons above mentioned are best illustrated in Fig. 6 and each of said pistons comprises an internally threaded sleeve 10% formed at opposite ends with reduced cylindrical trunnions 105 which are rotatably mounted in the bushings 106 which in' turn are fitted in the openings 102 and 103. Threaded into the sleeve 104: are suitable stems 106 having formed at their outer ends the bodies or disks 107 which in turn are formed with transversely extending arcuate heads 108. These heads 108 are curved to conform to the curvature of the ribs 92 and 93 and are o1 a width equal to the distance I between the end walls of the openings 94. In order to hold the pistons in place and against accidental movement, suitable tapered pins 109 are driven through tapered' openings drilled in the sleeve 104: and the stems 106 and thus any accidental movement of the heads is eliminated. In order to prevent the gases under pressure from entering the interior of the rotor partly cupped disks of spring steel are p sitioned between the pistons 107 and the sleeve 105. Clearance shown between disks 107 and bushings 106 are greatly exaggerated in order to show that disks 110 are made of suitable springy material. The clearance between the disks and bushings 107 is limited to .002 or .003 of one inch.

From the foregoing description it will be seen that the rotor is formed with a central chamber 112 in which the piston actuating mechanism is mounted. The piston actuating mechanism above mentioned is best illustrated in Figs. 3 and 5 and comprises a cam 113 which is mounted on the inner end of the bushing 51. This cam is circular in cross section and is formed with a cam groove 11a in which the piston actuating rollers run. The wall 86 of the rotor has bolted or otherwise attached thereto suitable guide plates 115 which are provided with the outwardly extending guide flanges 116 in which the sliding rack barsare slidably mounted. The sliding rack bars above referred to comprise the bodies 117 formed with the longitudinally extending stems 118 which are provided adjacent their outer ends with a plurality of rack teeth 119. These teeth are adapted to mesh with the teeth 120 formed on the exterior of the sleeve 10% and it will thus be seen that as the slide 17 moves inwardly or outwardly, the sleeve 104: will be rotated. In order that the sleeve may be rotated, the body 117 has extending outwardly therefrom a stud 121 on which a roller 122 is mounted and as shown in Figs. 3 and 5, the rollers 122 project into the cam groove 11 i and when each piston head is downwardly, it will be seen that the cam will operate to cause the piston head which is in the lowermost position to turn into the position illustrated in Fig. at so as to pass between the vanes 82 and 83.

The gases used to operate the engine are delivered in any suitable manner to the manifold? from which it will enter the motor by passing through the port 60 and out through the passage 59 into the annular passage 48 from whence the gas will pass through the opening 68 and then into the passage 49 between the annular ribs 92 and municating ofthe gas through the passages previously referred to. After the gas has made a complete revolution, it will be seen that the same will pass out through the. portsv 65 and 7Q and into the exhaust manifold 10 where it enters the atmosphere. Should it be desired to reverse the operation of the motor it will be seen that the. reversing lever 123 which is pivoted at 1% is shifted thereby imparting motion through the link 125 to the levers 76 which movement will cause the stems 7 3 to partially rotate thus moving the vanes to the desired position. Upon the movement of the rotor within the stator, it will be seen that as the heads move toward the vanes 82v and 83, the cam will move the slide inwardly thus causing the sleeve to rotate and move the piston heads so that they aline with the ribs and after the same have passed between the vanes the cam again turns the heads so as to extend transversely of the passages and in such a manner that the gases will again impinge against the active faces of the heads and thereby keep the rotor in motion.

While in the foregoing there has been shownand described the preferred embodiment of this invention, it is to be understood that such changes may be made in the combination and arrangement of parts as will fall within the spirit and scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed is I 1. In. a reversible rotary motor, a stator having a pair of annular passages arranged therein, a rotor. within the stator, said rotor carrying a pair of oppositely extending annular ribs arranged centrally of the annular passages in the stator, heads rotatably mounted in the rotor, the stator being pro vided with a transverse bore near its lower end and having an inlet passage leading to the transverse bore, said inlet passage comwith the annular passage through the transverse bore, the stator having an outlet passage communicating with the transverse passage, and vanes operable in the bore to direct the passage of inflowing gases against the heads of the rotor and directing the outfio'wing gases into the exhaust manifold.

2. A reversible rotary motor including a stator having a pair of annular passages arranged therein, a rotor operable within the stator, flanges on the rotor extending into the annular passages, the stator being provided with inlet ports and having a transverse bore near itsunder side through which the inlet ports communicate with the annular passages, said stator also having outlet ports communicating with the annular passages, heads extending transversely of the annular passages, said heads being adapted to be turnedlongitudinally to extend in a planewith the flanges and vanes for directingthefiow of the gases from the. inlet ports into the annular passages and thence to the outlet ports.

3. In a reversible. rotary motor, a stator having a pair of annular passages arranged therein, a rotor" withinthe stator, ribs on the rotor and arranged centrally of the annular passages in the stator, transverse bores extending through the rotor at spaced interva-ls, pistons with-in the transverse bores, heads on the pistons conforming to the shape of the ribs and adapted when turned in one position to extend transversely of the ribs and when turned into. another position to extend longitudinally of the ribs, a stationary cam carried by the stator, carriages slidable within the rotor, rack bars carried by the carriages, segments carried by the pistons and meshing, with the rack bars, and cam rollers on the carriages to cause the said carriages to reciprocate according to the direction of the cam.

In. a reversible rotary motor, a stator having a pair of annular passages arranged therein, said stator also having inlet ports formed laterally of the annular passages and being provided with a transverse bore at its lower end establishing communication between the annular passages and the inlet ports, the stator also having an outlet port communicating with the transverse b'ore, and vanes rockably mounted in the annular passagesfor directing the flow of gases through the annular passages.

5. In a reversiblerotary motor, a stator having a pair of annular passages arranged therein, a. rotor within the stator, said rotor carrying a pair of oppositely extending annular ribs arranged centrally of the annular passages in the stator, heads. rotatably mounted in the rotor, the stator being provided with a transverse bore near its lower end and having an inlet passage leading into the transverse bore, said inlet passage communicating with the annular passage through the transverse bore, the stator 1m: ing an outlet passage communicatin with the transverse passage, and means for directing the inflowing gases against said said rib, includin a cam carried by said stator, carriages s idably supported by said rotor and shdable by engagement with said .cam, and means connecting: said carriages and'said pistons for intermittently rotating the, piston upon sliding movement of the carriages,

. 7., In a reversible rotary, motor, a stator.

Cir

having an annular passage, a rotor Within the stator, an annular rib formed upon the rotor and arranged centrally of said annular passage, pistons having heads carried by said rib, and means for turning said pistons transversely to or in alinement with said rib, including a channel cam carried by said stator, carriages slidably supported by said rotor, rollers carried by said carriages and riding in the channel of said cam for reciprocating said carriages during the rotation of said rotor, and means connecting said carriages and said pistons or intermittently rotating the pistons upon reciprocatory movement of the carriages.

8. In a reversible rotary motor, a stator having an annular passage a rotor Within the stator, an annular rib i ormed upon the rotor and arranged centrally of said annular passage, pistons having heads carried by said rib, and means for turning said pistons transversely to or in alinement With said rib, including a channel cam carried by said stator, carriages slidably supported by said rotor, rollers carried by said carriages and riding in the channel of said'oam for reciprocating said carriages during the rotation of said rotor, means connecting said carriages and said pistons for intermittently rotating the pistons upon reciprocatory movement of the carriages, and vanes oper-- able to direct the passage of inflowing gases against the heads of said pistons and di-- recting the outflowing gases into the ex haust manifold.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence of two Witnesses.

GEORGE A. BEETS CH.

Witnesses:

WILLIAM H. BROOKE, JAMES E. PoYAs, Jr.

copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner ct Patents Washington, D. W

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2747551 *Jul 24, 1952May 29, 1956Baker Jr Harold WRotary motor and pump
US3886734 *May 23, 1973Jun 3, 1975Richard G JohnsonContinuous combustion engine
US6065289 *Jun 24, 1998May 23, 2000Quiet Revolution Motor Company, L.L.C.Fluid displacement apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification418/215, 418/264, 418/94
Cooperative ClassificationF03C2/30, F04C2/3441