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Publication numberUS1262806 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1918
Filing dateMay 11, 1917
Priority dateMay 11, 1917
Publication numberUS 1262806 A, US 1262806A, US-A-1262806, US1262806 A, US1262806A
InventorsDustin Kemble
Original AssigneeDustin Kemble
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rolling-chair.
US 1262806 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. KEMBLE.

ROLLING CHAIR.v

APrLlcmourlLsn1m33.191s. nsnewen Mun. 19u..

l Patented Apr. 16, 1918.

, 4 sums-*sneer I.

y Ls' D. KEVIBLE.

ROLLING CHAIR.

APPLICATION FILED IULY3 1915. RENEWED MAY 11.1917.

Patented Apr. 16, 1918.

4 SHEES-SHEET 2.

52 i7 5a' 7.9 37 J0 D. KEMBLE.

ROLLING CHAIR.

APPLICATION FILED 1ULY31915 RENEWED MAY l1`.l917

.Patented Apr. 16, 1918.

l/fff :Y zw Y V 7 nl KEMBLE. ROLLING CHAIR.

w3 ...D1 Y A M D E w E N E Dn m w. m V.. l.- u D u N O U A C H P. v A

G PO 8 9 2 n@ 9W, l

4 SHEE'I S-SHEET 4.

- UNITED sTATEs PATENT oEErcE.

nUsTm KEMBLE, oF LISBON, oHIo.

ROLLING-CHAIR.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Application led July 3, 1915, Serial No. 37,9413. Renewed May 11, 1917. Serial No. 168,044.

To all whom t may concern:

Be it known'that- I, DUsTIN KEMBLE, a citizen of the United States, residing at'Lisbon, in the county of Columbiana and State of Ohio, have invented certain new and useful Improvements inRolling- Chairs, of which the following is a specification.

My inventionvrelates particularly to electrically propelled invalid or pleasure cha-irs and their control and has for its object the provision of a safe, comfortable and useful vehicle vwhich can be readily operated and controlled by invalids, delicate persons or others both for convenience and pleasure. To attain this object, and advantages which will be herein described, I employ the construction and operating and controlling means shown in the accompanying drawings in which:-

Figure 1 is a plan and Fig. 2 is a side elevation of a chair embodying my invention.

Fig. 3 is a plan view in partial section on a horizontal plane through the main Wheels and axle of the chair, the s/ection being taken on line a-Tb of Fig. 4.

Fig. 4 is a vertical section online c-d of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a partial section on an enlarged scale through the motor shafts, on line c-cl of Fig. 3.' y

Fig. 6 is a longitudinal section through the hub of one of the main wheels of the chair.

Fig. 7 is a transverse section of the main wheel driving ratchet on line e-f of Fig. 6.

Fig. 8 is a section on line g-k of Fig. 3 showing the arrangement of springs and other details.

Fig. 9 is a diagram of the electrical connections and controlling devices which I employ. v

' Fig. 10 is a partial section on line m-m of Fig.`l4, showing the location of the operating and brake levers.

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary view showing the brake and its connections.

Referring to the drawings, 1, represents the chair or vehicle body which is provided\ with a seat, 2, the back, 3, the floor plate, 4, the panel, 5, the steering post bearing, 6. Any. suitable upholstery, 7, may be employed. The chair is provided with two main `ground or driving wheels, 8, 9, Whose functions will be presently described. A

12 is the main wheel axle. The major portion of the weight of the chair body, the

equipment and the passenger is carried by the under-slung springs, 13, 14, whose ends are connected to the seat, 2, bythe spring shackles, 15, 16. The springs, 13, 14, are connected to the under side of the bearings, 17, 17, in which the axle, 12, revolves, by means of the spring bolts, 18, 18.

The main wheels, 8, 9, are rotatively mounted upon the axle, 12. 'In Fig. 6 the details .of the main Wheel hub construction are shown. l19 is the body of the hub which, as shown, is provided with flanges, 20, 20, to which are secured the inner ends of the wire spokes, 21, 21. 22 is the bearing bushing'for the axle, 12, in the wheel hub, 19. 23 is a brake drumformed upon, or-which may be att-ached to the wheel hub. 24 is a brake band which, by means of suitable connections, such as lever, 25, and rod, 26, Fig. 11, may be made to tighten about the drum, 23, and retard or stop the chair. The outer end of the wheel hub, 19, is extended in the form of a cylindrical flange, 27, on the inner surface of which is formed 'a ratchet, 28. C'ooperating with' this ratchet is the pawl. 29, which is pivoted to the collar, 30, which is keyed to the axle, 12, and secured thereto by means of the washer, 31, and nut, 32. Shoulders, 33 and 34, are formed upon axle, 12, the distance between these shoulders being slightly greater than the length of the bushing, 22, yso that when collar, 30, is clamped tightly against shoulder, 34, the hub, 19. may still be free to rotate;`

It will be seen that as the axle, 12, is rotated in the direction to propel the chair forward, the pawl. 29. will engage a tooth of the ratchet28and cause the main drive wheel to rotate and carryv the chair with it. I prefer to provide this ratchet and pawl drive for each of th'e main drive wheels, although it. is not absolutely essential to the operation of the chair. One of the main drive wheels may be fixed to the axle with a be arranged to propel the chair backward upon reversal of-the motor. With my preferred arrangement, however, a very satis- -factory compensating movement takes. place between the wheels .when vturning corners, and it is not essential that the chair be power driven for backing.

The main drive wheels, 8, 9, are shown provided with hand rims, 35, 36, which may be used for manipulating the chair as desired.

Upon the outer end of the drive wheel hub, 19, is screwed the'hub cap, 37. A

spring, 38, of any convenient form may be r wheel, 41,.which is adapted to be driven by the motor, 42, by means of the clutch, 43, and worm, 44. Attached to bearings, 17, 17, by bolts, 18, 18, and supported on axle, 12,

. by bearings, 45, 46, is the frame or` plate, 47,

upon which is mounted the housing, 48', whichincloses worm wheel, 41, and worm,l 44. Annular bearings, 49, 50, carried by housing, 48, take the radial thrust, and thrust bearings, 51, 52, take the end thrust of worm, 44. lThe frame or plate, 47, has longitudinal arms, 53, 54, extending parallel with axle, 12, and cross arms, 55, 56, extending crosswise-to the axle, 12. The longitudinal arms, 53, 54, are secured to the under side of bearings, 17,17, by the bolts, 18, 18,

which also serve to secure the springs, 13, 14,

as previously described.

To the under side of cross arm, 55, is secured the direct current motor, 42, whose armature shaft, 57, is extended through the hub of worm, 44, and is free to revolve therein.4 @ne member, 58, of jaw clutch, 43, is mounted upon and keyed to an extension of the hub of worm, 44, and the other member, 59, of clutch, 43, is slidably mounted upon shaft, 57, and driven thereby through the key, 60. The outer end of shaft, 57, projects beyond the hub .of worm, 44, and has one member, 61, of a jaw clutch, 62, keyed to it.

- The other member, 63, of clutch, 62, is slidably mounted upon the rotor shaft, 64, of another motor, 65, which is secured to the under side ofcross arm, 56, of plate,'47, the two shafts, 57 and 64, being in axial alinement. A key, 66, makes driving connection between shaft, 64, and .clutch member, 63. A sleeve, 67, surrounds the adjacent ends of shafts, 57 and 64, and enters counterbores in clutch members, 61 and 63, to assist in preserving the alinement of these shafts, which are free to revolve in sleeve, 67.

It will be seen from the foregoing description that motion may be imparted toworm, 44, from shaft, 57, when clutch, 43,`is engaged, and that motion may be imparted to shaft, 57, from shaft, 64, when clutch, 62, is engaged. lt will also be obvious that when nacaeoe clutch, 62, is disengaged, worm, 44, may be driven by motor, 42,z through clutch, 43, while motor, 65, is at rest.`

rlhe object of the above described arrangement of parts is to provide for propelling .the chair by motor, 42, by current from the storage battery, 68, which is carried by a supporting frame, 69, supported by attachments to the body of the chair, and to further provide for disengaging the motor, 42, from the chair propelling mechanism and for drivin this motor, 42, as a generator for charging t e storage battery, by power developed in m0tor,'65, which may be either of the ldirect oralternating current type, and

which is adapted to be connected to an ex- 1 ternal source of electric current.

At the rear of the vehicle, l' provide a swivel wheel, 11, carried by a fork, 70,

. the stem of which, 71, is supported in a bear- .ing in frame, 72, which is divided and extends forward to the axle, 12, to which it is rotatively secured by bearings, 73, 7 4.

Cross arm, 55, has an extension, 75, which projects beyond the motor, 42, and is pro- ,vided with a guide, 76, for a vertical pin, 7 7

which is pivotally secured at 78 to frame, 72. Surrounding pin, 77, between the extension,

7 5, of cross arm, 55, and frame, 72, is a helit cal spring, 79, pressing, at the top, against the extension, 7 5, and at the bottom, against the frame, 72, withany initial tension that may be found necessary or desirable.

The objects of the rear wheel,` 11, and spring, 7 9, are to prevent the backward Voverturning of `the chair and to provide a means for cushioning certain shocks which would otherwise be directly and suddenly imparted to the chair body, through the main springs', when the vehicle runs over an obstacle, particularly when mounting or descending a `street curbstone. A further lobject of the Wheel, 11, is to provide means for resisting the tendency of the worm, 44, to travel around the worm Wheel 41, when power is being tranmitted from the motor, 42, to the axle, 12. This tendency is resisted in part by designing the chair so that its center of gravity, when` the chair is completely equipped, is in front of 'the axle, 12, and is further resistedby the reaction of the roadway upon the wheel, 11, which is transmitted through the wheel fork, 70, frame, 72, and spring, 7 9, to plate, 47, to which is secured the housing 48, which supports the bearings for the worm. l A

lit will be seen that the above mentioned tendency of the worm, 44, to travel around the worm wheel, 11, is met only by' spring resistance. The moment of the weight of the chair resists the moment of the worm about the axle, 12, through the main springs, 13, 14, to whose axle bearing supports', 17, 17, the worm housing, 48, is rigidly connect- .ed by plate, 47; and the moment of the roadway reaction npon wheel, `11, acts through the spring, a7 9, as previouslyl described. These are lm portant features of y my invention which add materially to the comfort of the passenger and to the mechanical life of the chair.

Particular attention'is drawn to the organization and functions of my rear wheel whose objects have already been vbriefly outlined. By my construction, it is possible for the/chair to be driven over obstacles without fear of physical discomfort of the passenger. When mounting a curb, the passenger, by leaning back in the chair may partially relieve the front wheel of its pressure on thev roadway and place a considerable weight upon the rear wheel, so that the front wheel will readil mount the curb. Then, by leaning forward, the total weight of the chair and passenger may be largely divided between the front and reary wheels, so that themain drive wheels will readily mountthe curb, when the rear wheel will follow without imparting severe shock to the passenger. Similarly, when descending a curb, the wheels may be dropped in succession from front to rear, with a minimum of discomfort to the passenger. l

While I have shown only one front and one rear wheel,A it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that two wheels maybe used instead of one, either lin front lor in the rear, or both in` front and irear, and

that they may be connected to their supports in any well known manner. l For the sake of lightness and simplicity, I prefer to use only one front and one rear wheel.

IThe electrical connections and control of my chair are show/n in diagram in Fig. 9. In this ligure the electric motors, switches,

' and other devices are shown in conventional symbolism. In this diagram, 42 is the chair propelling' motor, and 65 is the motor which 1s employedA for driving motor, 42, as a generator for charging the storage battery, 68. 80 is a rheostat for use in starting and operating motor, 42. The operation of the -rheostat is effected by means of lever, 80a,

Vto

and suitable mechanical connections shown by dotted lines in Fig. 10. 81 and 82 are circuit controlling switches adapted to perform certain functions whichwill be presently described. A

I 81 ,is a single pole switch, adapted to be manually opened, the arm, 83, of which is pivoted atl-84 to `a contact electrically. connected to one terminal of the, storage Vbattery, 68. A spring, 85, is provided to close arm, 83,"upon contact, 86, which lis electrically connected to brush, 87, of motor, 42. The arm, 83, is provided with a notch `o r other means for .engaging with a detent hook, 88, upon the lever, 89, which carries the keeper, 9 0, of electromagnet, 91. A spring,92, attached to lever, 89, opposes the hold detent hook, 88, in engagement with the notch in arm, 83, to hold the latter in open position shown by full lines in the drawing. 93 is a stop pin for limitingthemovement of lever, 89. 94 and 95 are stop pins for limiting the movement of switch arm, 83,

82 is a three pole switchfhaving switch arms, 96, 97 and 98, pivoted respectively to contacts, 99, 100 and 101. The three arms, l96, 97 and 98, are mechanically connected by the cross b ar, 102. Switch, 82, is adapted to be manually closed, and to be opened bythe action of aspring, 103, which is shown attached to an extension of arm, 96, beyond the pivot Contact, 99. The eX- tension of arm, 96, is provided lwith a notch' or other means for engaging withy a detent f switch, 82, make Contact with terminals,

109, 110 and 111 respectively, when thrown to the right, as shown in the drawing. An additional terminal, 112, is provided, and arm,'l98, makes contact with this terminal when the switch, 82, is thrown to the left. Stop pins, 113 and 114, are provided to1 `li1nit the movement 'of the arms of switch,

82. Switches, 81` and 82, may be located at any'v convenient place on the chair.

The connections and functions ofthe devices just described will be best understood from the following description of the elec# trical operation'and control of my inven-l tion.

-, Assuming that the battery is properlyv charged and that the chair is ready for operation, the position of the switches will be as follows z-Rheostat, 80,-will be open, its contact lever being thrown to the left' as shownin the drawing. Switch, 81, will the drawing. Switch, 82, will be thrown to the left, opening the -circuits through arms, 96 and 97, and closing arm, 98, upon terminal, 112. Before starting the chair, the clutch, 62, will be disengaged and clutch, 43, will be engaged. To start the chair, the passenger will move the lever of rheostat,

'80, to the right, closing the circuit through the rheostat. As soon as the rheostat circuit is closed, current will How from the battery, 68, through the motor, 42, by way4 of the: following circuit z--From terminal, 115, current will flow through conductor, 116, rheostat, 80, conductor, 117, motor, 42, conductor 118, switcl1,81 and conductor,

119,-to the other terminal, 120, of battery,

68. It will be seen that switch arm, 83, is

be closed, as shown by the dotted lines in l shunted by electromagnet, 91, the circuit vbeing made from the terminal, 86, through words is a voltage coil, and the currentl which will flow through it when switch arm, 83 is closed, will be negligible.

lt will be seen that the chair may be operated by merely manipulating the lever of the rheostat, 80. Should it occur that the switch, 81, has been left open', it will be automatically closed as soon as the circuit is madethrough rheostat, 80. F or,'under such conditions, the potential of the battery will be applied to the coil of electromagnet, 91, at terminals, 86 and 84, and the detent hook, 88, will be disengaged by the pull of electromagnet, 91, thus allowing switch, 81, to close and the motor, 42, to start.

To charge the battery rby current developed in the motor, 42, driven as a generator by motor, 65, clutch, 43, is disengaged and clutch, 62, is engaged. Connections are made to an external source of electric current, by any suitable means vto terminals,

123 'and 124, of the circuit leading to the motor, 65. Switch, 81, is manually opened and is retained in an open position by detent hook, 88. Switch, 82, is now manually thrown to the right and held there until detent hook, 104, engages to retain the vswitch closed. The closing of switch, 82,

completes the circuit through motor, 65, by way of terminal, 123, conductor, 125, motor brushes, 126 and 127, conductor, 128, switch arm, 97, conductor, 129, and terminal 124. It will be seen that up to this time the battery circuit to motor, 42, is open. As soon as the motor, 65, starts to rotate, an electromotive force willbe generated in the armature of motor, 42, which now becomesa generator. A circuit from dynamo, 42, through electromagnet, 91, is completed when switch arm, 98, contacts with terminal, 111, the circuit passing from brush, 87, through conductor, 118, terminal, 86, conductor, 120,

- electromagnet, 91, conductor, 121, arm, 98,

conductor, 130, and conductor, 117, back to the dynamo, 42'. The strengths of electromagnet, 91, and spring, 92, are so proportioned that the pull of the electromagnet, 91, will overpower thatv of the spring, 92, upon lever, 89, when the electromotive force of dyanmo, 42, is suiiicient to overcomethat of the battery, 68. When such a condition is reached, detent hook, 88, will release switch arm, 83, and the latter will be thrown into contact with terminal, 86, by spring, 85.

A circuit will now be establishedv from the dynamo, 42, through battery, 68, from brush, 87, through conductor, 118,switch arm, 83, conductor, 119, battery, 68, conductor, 116, conductor, 132, electromagnet, 107 switch and the hand incase@ arm, 96, conductor, 131, and conductor, 117, back tothe dynamo, 42. As soon as the battery charging current energizes lelectromagnet, 107, sufficiently to overpower the spring, 108, the lever, 105, will be pulled upward and detent hook, 104, will engage the notch on the extension of arm, 96, and hold the switch, 82, closed as shown in the drawing,

of the operator may be removed. f

Should the current decrease so that the pull of spring, 108, overpowers that of the electromagnet, 107, the detent hook, 104, .will again be disengaged from the notch on the extension of switch arm, 96, and switch, 8c 82, will be opened by spring, 103, thus stopping motor, 65, and opening the circuit between the battery, 68, and dynamo, 42.

For handling the chair up and down stairs, as, for instance, when taking the chair into a house or onto a porch, 1 provide a drum, 133, and cable, 134. The drum, 133, is rotatively and slidably mounted upon aXle, 12, and is provided with a friction clutch element, 135, on onev si'de adjacent t0 90 the hub ot` worm wheel, 41, which carries a correspondino` friction clutch element, 136.

A lever, 137, plvoted at' 138 to the plate, 47, and in operative engagement with the drum, 133, is provided for shifting the latter so that its clutch element, 135, will engage the clutch element, 136, on worm, 41.

In order to operate this drum and cable device to draw the chair up an incline, l provide a reversing switch, not shown, for 10@ the motor, 42. When equipped with this device, both of the main drive wheels, 8, 9, are provided with ratchet drives for forward propulsion only, .and the -rotation of the axle, 12, in the reverse direction is not transmitted to the drive wheels. rThe cable, 134, is, accordingly, placed upon vthe drum, 133, so as to wind upon it, when axle, 12, is rotated in the reverse direction.

Upon the fra-me of the chair body, upon 11o ,i

or near the steering post bearing,'6, I provide a guide, 139, for the cable, 134.

`When it is desired to haul. the chair up stairs or other steep incline, the cable, 134, is brought forward through guide, 139, and attached t0 a suitable fixed anchor or post, the motor, 42, is reversed and the clutch members, 135 and 136, engaged. rlhe cable, 134, will now be wound upon the drum, 133, and the cha-ir will be drawn up the incline.

To let the chair down an incline, the cable, 134, is attached as before to the fixed anchor or post, and the chair is let down the incline by'allowing the clutchmembers, 135 and 136, to slip by manipulating the lever, 137. 1f 125 the inclination of the teeth of the worm wheel, 41, and worm, 44, is such that motion cannot be transmitted from the worm wheel, 41, to the worm, 44, it will not b e necessary to operate the motor, 42, when letting the 130 chair down an incline. If motion can be transmitted from worm wheel, 41, to worm, 44, the motor, 42, will be operated in the direction to wind cable, 134, on drum, 133, and the descent of the chair will be controlled by the friction of clutch members, 135 and 136, as before.

To prevent the rotation of the drum, 133, when not in use I provide projections upon its hub which will engage, corresponding projections upon bearings, 46. I prefer to arrange these interlocking projections so that they will not engage immediately upon the release of. clutch members, 135 and 136, but so that there will be an intermediate'position in which the drum may rotate freely when the cable is being paid out for attachment tothe ixed point.

It will be apparent that the chair may 'be drawn up an incline, backward, or let down an incline forward, by running the cable to the rear of the chair instead of to the front.

To assist n the support of the chair body, and to prevent unduevibrations of it, I provide the slotted post guides, 140, 141, which permit the chair body and axle to have free, vertical, relative movement but prevent the direct forward and'back movement which is objectionable to nervous persons.

It will be seen from the foregoing that I have provided simple and safe, yet complete method and means for the control and 'operation of my electrically propelled invalid chair, self contained in the organization of the chair and equipment. lThe advantages of my invention are numerous and not found in any similar apparatus which has been proposed, so far as I am aware.

Some of these advantages are The chair, having. both front and rear wheels, can not be overturned forwardl or backward. This feature gives the passenger a sense of security and a positive protection which the ordinary rolling chair does not aord.

Forward and back vibrations, or jiggling, which are very trying to the nerves, are almost entirely eliminated or are transformed into a spring cushioned swaying, by my improved construction, the chair body being at all times pivoted onthe main axle by the slotted post guides so that movements of the chair body relative to the main axle are confined to vertical or rotary movements.

By my construction the width of the chair may be made so that it may be used on.

narrow sidewalks and pass through crowds with a minimum of inconvenience.

An especial advantage 5f my inventlon lies in its ability to negotiate street crossings as has been previously mentioned.

No garage or special housing provision is needed formy chair as it may be kept in the house or any building and readily handles4 itself in entering and leaving.

No special facilities are needed for charging the electric storage battery as such facilities are provided by my invention.

`No pushingattendant is necessary, yet the chair has the ability to ascend. and descend steeper grades than it would be possible fOr either man pushed or hand rim vpropelled. chairs to negotiate with safety if at all.

Its weight'is small compared tothat of the smallest automobile.

Further, and vperhapsmost important, the

use of -my -invention adds greatly to the supported .by bearings upon the axle, a platev xed to the bearings and extending rearwardly therefrom, a frame swiveled on, the

axle and extending rearwardly-therefrom, a

Letters L chair, the mainl drive I rear wheel mounted in asupport carried by the frame, and a spring interposed between the plate and the frame to oppose the backlward overturning of the bearings about the axle.

2. In a rolling chair, the main drivel wheels, vthe axle therefor, the steering wheel, the chair body, springs for the chair body supported by bearings upon the axle, aplate fixed to the bearings and extending rearwardly therefrom, a motor mounted on the plate and having a driving connection with the axle, a frame swiveled on the axle and extending rearwardlyv` therefrom, al rear wheel mounted in a support carried by the frame, a spring interposed between theplate and the frame to oppose the backward over- 'v turning of the bearings about the axle, and

driving means between the axle and the main drive wheels.

3. In a rolling chair, main drive wheels mounted upon an axle, spring supports carried by the axle, a chair body,"springs inter-- posed between the chair body and said spring supports, a frame swiveled upon the axle and extending rearwardly therefrom, a

ground wheel mounted in said frame, and

, means interposed between said frame and said spring supports to oppose the backward overturning of thev spring supports.I

4. In a rolling' chair having an axle and two ground wheels loosely mounted upon the axle, a drum carried by the axle, a cable wound upon the drum and adapted to have its free end secured to a fixed point at a distance from the chair, means carried bythe 'chair for preventing the rotation of the axle,

land a friction brake between the axle and `(the drum to control the rotation of the drum when lowering the chair by gravity.

5. In a rolling chair, drive wheels mounted upon an axle, two independent frames swiveled on said axle, a chair body mounted on `one of said frames, a rear ground Wheel mounted on a support in the other of said frames, and elastic means interposed be tween said frames, whereby, when said ed upon an axle, a main frame carried by bearings upon'said axle, a chair body supported by springs upon said frame, a second trame pivotedfto rock in the same vertical, longitudinal plane as said main frame, and thaving one end extendingrearwardly from said axle, a rear ground wheel carried by a support in said second frame, and a spring interposed between said frames to resist the backward overturning of-said main frame about said axle.

7. ln a rolling chair, drive wheels mounted upon an axle, two independent frames carried by said axle extending rearwardly therefrom'one abovethe other and adapted to rock'to and from each other about said axle, a chair body carried by the upper said frame, a ground wheel carried by the lower said frame, and a spring interposed between said frames to yeldingly hold themapart.

8. ln a rolling chair having drive wheels and an axle therefor in driving connection` with one of said wheels, a worm wheel mounted upon the axle in drivingv connection therewith, a housing for said worm wheel swiveled on said axle, a worm mounted in bearings in said housingand operatively engaging said worm wheel, a motor mounted on said housing, driving connections between said motor and said worm, a chair body supported on said housing, a frame pivoted to rock about said axle and extending rearwardly therefrom, a rear ground wheel carried by a supportin said frame', and a spring interposed between said housing and said :trame to oppose the backward overturning of said housing about said axle.

9. In a rolling chair having drive wheels, and an axle therefor in driving connection with one of said wheels; power transmitting gearing connected to said axle; a housing for said gearing supported by bearings on said axle; a motor mounted on said housing; driving connections between said motor and said power transmitting gearing; a chair body supported on said housing; a frame, pivoted to rock in a vertical plane transverse to said axle, extending rearwardly therefrom; a rear ground wheel carried by a support in said frame; and a spring interposed between said housing and said frame to oppose the backward voverturning'otl said housing about said axle.

Laeaeoe 10. 1n a rolling chair, a pair of drive.

wheels rotatably mounted on an axle, means .cooperating with the axle and one of the drive wheels whereby said wheel is rotated by said axle for propelling the chair forward, a housing supported by bearings rota-` `body adapted to support a portion of the weight of the chair, and a spring interposed between said housing and said frame to oppose the backward overturning of said hous-y ing about said axle.

1l. In a rolling chair, main drive Wheels mounted upon an axle, a housing carried by bearings upon the axle, a chair body, springs supporting the chair body upon the housing, a frame swiveled on the axle and extend ing rearwardly therefrom,l a ground wheel mounted lon said frame, and a spring interposed between said housing and said frame to oppose the backward rotation of said housing about said axle.

12. In a rolling chair, a pair otdrive wheels rotatably mounted upon an axle,'a-

chair body, an axle housing supported by bearings on the axle, a 'rearward extension therefrom, springs carried by the axle hous-l ing and supporting and securing the chair body thereto, a motor mounted upon the axle housing and having a driving 'connection to the axle, a frame journaled to'the axle and extending rearwardly therefrom, a rear wheel support swiveled therein, a rear wheel carried in the rear wheel support, a spring interposed betweenthe frame and the axle housing to prevent the backward overturning of the chair body, driving "means between the axle and one of the drive wheels, and a front steering wheel mounted in a swivel support on the chair body.

13. In a rolling chair, an axle; two ground wheels rotatably mounted thereon; a drum rotatably mounted on said axle.; a cable wound upon the drum and adapted to have its free end secured to a fixed point at a distance from the chair; a reversible motor mounted on the chair; driving connections between the motor and the axle; means connecting said axle and one ,of said wheels to rotate said wheel to propel the chair forward only; and a clutchon said axlefada-pted to engage and rotate said drum with said axle, whereby, when said cable has its free endsecured to a fixed point at a distance from said chair, said clutch is engaged, and said motor is operated, said chair may be drawn toward said fixed point by said cable.

between said axle and said drum; and means v for engaging and disengaging said friction means; whereby, when said axle is rotated by said motor, said "drum maybe rotated to vwind said cable, and whereby when said cable is secured to a fixed point at a distance from y the chair the movement of the chaira down an incline may be controlled by said friction means. l v

v15. In a-,rolling chair, an axle; ground wheels rotatably mounted thereon a drum rotatably mounted on the axle; a cablewound upon therdrum and ladapted .to have its free end secured to a fixed point at a distance from the chair; locking means on said chair independentof said axle adapted when engaged with vsaid drum to lock ity against rotation; and means lfor engagingv said drum and said locking means.

16l In a -rolling chair, an axle; ground wheels rotatably' mounted thereon; a .drum rotatably mounted on the axle; a' cable wound upon the drum vand vvadapted to have its free end secured to 'a Afixed point at a 'distance from the chair; a motor mounted on the chair; driving connections between the motor and the axle; friction vdriving means between the axle and the drum; means for 'engaging 'and disengaging said friction means; locking means on the chair,

independent of the axle, adapted, when en-` gagedwith said drum, to lock it against rotation; and means for engaging said drum and said locking means.

17. In a .rolling chair, a pair of main carrying wheels mounted on an ax'ie; a

front steeringwbeel; a chair body spring supported on said axle; a swivel support for said steering wheel fixed to said chair body; a rear ground wheel; and means for holding said rear ground wheel in vertically yielding contact with 'the ground so that a por-` tion of the weight of the'chair is at all times carried 'by said rear ground wheel,`

18. In a rolling chair, a'pair oflmain carrying Wheels'and an axle therefor; a chair body extending forward and back-4 Ward from said axle; spring supports interposed between the axle and the chair body; a steering Wheel mounted by 'a fork and swivel joint support upon the chair body vin front of the axle; and a ground wheel.

at the rear ofthe axle, mounted. by a fork and swivel joint support yieldlngly oonnected to the chairbody; w ereby both the on even ground.'

front steering Wheel and the rear ground.

wheel are each made tor carry a part `of the weight of the chair at the same time on uneven as Well as on even ground. Y v

19. In a rolling chair, a pair of main carrying wheels and an axle therefor; a chair body; supporting means connecting the chair body and the axle; la` steering wheel mountedby a fork and swivel joint support at the front ofthe chair; a rear wheel and elastic means for holding said` rear wheel in' yielding contact with the ground, said elastic Irneans reacting through` the chairbody upon said steering Wheel to cause said steering wheel and said rear wheel to carry part of the weight of the chair at the same time on uneven as well as l 20. In a rolling chair, a pair'of *main carrying wheels andan axle therefor; a chair body `mounted* by' springs on .said

axle; a front steering wheel mounted in av fixed 'swivelsupport at the front of said chair and a rear wheel mounted in a swivel support at the rear of the chair; said swivel support for the rear wheel havingl a yielding springconnection with the chair body whereby said 'chair body may be tilted backward. so as to raise said steerinlg' the level of the ground with w ich the other wheels of the chair are in contact, in order wheel above! to facilitate the mounting-of a street curb l or other obstacle; v

21'. In a rolling chair, a vpair of main carrying wheels andan axletherefor; a chair body. mo1mted on said axle; a front steering'wheel mounted in a swivel support at the front of said chair; a rearv groundV wheel mounted in a swivel support'at the rear of the chair; and elastic means inter-.-

posed between said rear wheel support and the chair body whereby said rear wheel is yieldingly pressedv against thel ground to cause said rear wheel and said steering vwheel te carry part .ofthe weight of the chair at the same time on uneven. as welllas on even ground.v

22. In a rolling chair7 a pair .of main carrying ,wheels andan axle therefor; a

chair body; springs connected -b shacklesl tothe chair body and supporte by bear-` ings-on said axle; a front steering wheel carried' by a swivel support .at the front of the e chair body; a rear groundwheel and a sup' port therefor; and elastic meansinter'posed between said'rear ground wheel support and said bearings VJfor holding/said rear ground wheel in resiliently yieldingjcontact with the ground, thus forming a compound lever of -said chair body and'saidl springs Vwherelby the weight of the chair is carried partly by .themain carrying wheels.

23. carrying wheels and an axle therefor; a

chair body spring'mounted upon said axle;l

n a rolling chair,- a palr of main a steering wheel connected to the chair body in front of the axle, a swivel mounting carrying a ground wheel at the rear of the axle and having an elastic connection to the chair body adapted to press said ground wheel against the ground below as well as in or above the plane of Contact of the other wheels with the ground, thus causing both the steering wheel and the ground wheel to carry part of the weightdof the chair at all times onuneven as well. as on even ground.

24. In a rolling chair, a pair of main carrying wheels and an axle therefor; a chair body and springs interposed between the axle and the chair body; a steering wheel carried by a swivel support at the front of the chair and a rear ground wheel carried by a swivel support having a resilient connection to the chair body; and a post connected to the bottom of the chair body extending downward therefrom, and provided with a vertical slot to receive said axle as a guide therefor, and thus to prevent forward and backward vibration of said chair .body and torsional strains of said springs. y

25. ln a rolling chair, a pair of main carrying wheels and an axle therefor; a .chair body and springs linterposed between the axle and the chair body; a steering wheel carried by a swivel support atl the front of the chair and a rear ground wheel carried by a swivel support having a resilient connection to 'the chair body; and a post on either side of the chair connected to the /chair body, extending downward therefrom, each post bein provided with a vertical slot to receive an to form a guide for said axle, and thus to prevent torsional and side strains on said springs.

In testimony whereof I affix my signa-- ture iny presence of two Witnesses.

DUs'riN KEMBLE.

Witnesses:

AETHEL R. Coon,

R. Gr. CURREN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2592023 *Dec 23, 1946Apr 8, 1952Gleep Mfg Co IncMotor-driven invalid's chair
US2742973 *Jan 28, 1953Apr 24, 1956Johannesen Hans Arne IngolfPowered invalid chair and handle control therefor
US3166141 *Jul 15, 1960Jan 19, 1965Shields Morton KTractor
US3952822 *Mar 18, 1974Apr 27, 1976Stiftelsen Teknisk Hjalp At Handikappade PermobilstiftelsenElectrically powered wheel-chair for indoor and outdoor use
US6656010Sep 18, 2000Dec 2, 2003Mattel, Inc.Children's ride-on vehicle
US6755265Oct 30, 2001Jun 29, 2004Mattel, Inc.Children's ride-on vehicle
US6994179Jun 25, 2004Feb 7, 2006Mattel, Inc.Children's ride-on vehicle
US7530411Jul 2, 2007May 12, 2009Mattel, Inc.Children's ride-on vehicle
US8091658 *Oct 1, 2006Jan 10, 2012Industrial Technology Research InstituteWheel arrangement for a four-wheeled vehicle
US8141668Apr 6, 2009Mar 27, 2012Mattel, Inc.Children's ride-on vehicle
EP1575822A2 *Jun 5, 2003Sep 21, 2005Invacare CorporationMid-wheel drive scooter
EP1905675A1Sep 28, 2006Apr 2, 2008Industrial Technology Research InstituteWheel arrangement for a four-wheeled vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification180/206.5, 180/21, 180/65.1
International ClassificationB62M6/60
Cooperative ClassificationB62M6/60