Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1263093 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1918
Filing dateJul 26, 1917
Priority dateJul 26, 1917
Publication numberUS 1263093 A, US 1263093A, US-A-1263093, US1263093 A, US1263093A
InventorsElijah Misener Miers
Original AssigneeElijah Misener Miers
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ice-skate.
US 1263093 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. M. IVHERS.

ICE SKATE.

APPLICATION FILED JULYZB. 1911- 1,263,093. I I Patented Apr.16,1918.

Inventor.- I

- a TM SAcKKYYn Wm"; LLLLLLLLL ELIJ'AH MISENER mines, or winnroiv, oiv'rsmo, osivknn- ICE-SKATE.

Specification of Letters fatent.

Patented Apr. re, 1918.

Application filed July 26, 1917. Serial No. 182,957.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, ELIJAH MISENER MIERS, of the town of WViarton, in the county of Bruce and Province of Ontario, Dominion of Canada, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Ice- Skates; and I hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description of the same.

My invention relates to improvements in ice-skates, its main object being to embody in the structure of the skate a resilient function, whereby the jarring effect of the impact of the skate with the unyielding ice surface is practically nullified.

Such improved construction has the beneficial effect of a shock absorber, which results in a 'marked conservation of the strength of the skater, and is, therefore, productive of higher individual energy in maintaining speed and endurance, as the cushioning of the jarring impact largely tends to eliminate fatigue.

This beneficial effect is particularly advantageous in racing contests, where long or even short distances are to be covered, and the necessity of maintaining high speed is absolutely essential.

To these ends, my invention consists broadly of a runner-blade, vertical supporting members, a spring extending the length of the runner-blade and having its ends bent inwardly and under the main section of the spring and secured to the supporting members, and sole and heel plates secured to the spring.

My invention further consists of certain details of construction, all of which will be particularly described and pointed out in the claims.

In the drawings:

Figure 1, is a side elevation of my improved skate, showing the spring having its ends bent in semi-circular form;

Fig. 2, is a similar view showing the spring having its ends bent in pointed or semi-elliptical form;

Fig. 3, is a side elevation of the skate showing a modified form of spring in which a double wire construction is substituted for the flat form shown in Figs. 1 and 2;

Figs. 4 and are sectional details illustrating the formation of one of the supporting members;

Fig. 6, is an end elevation of the runner blade;

Fig. 7 is an end elevation of the runnerblade in engagement with the bent end of the spring shown in Figs. 1 and 2;

Fig. 8, is an end elevation of the runnerblade in engagement with the coiled end of the double wire spring shown in Fig. 3 and,

Fig. 9, is a detail view of one of the cushion springs.

Referring to the drawings, 1 is the runner-blade of the skate, having the upwardly-extending end members 2, 2, carrying the hinged arms 3, 3, each of which is provided with an end cross-pin 4. The hinged arms 3, 3, are carried on the pins or pivots 3 The vertical supporting members 5, 5, rising from the runner-blade 1,

and forming an integral part thereof, are provided with right-angled side flanges 6, 6, which may preferably be formed (as clearly shown in Figs. 4 and 5) by splitting the supporting member longitudinally and bending over the split section at right angles to the supporting member. In lieu of this particular construction, small angleplates might be utilized.

7 (see Fig. 1) is a flat metal spring, the main portion of which extends the length of the runner-blade, its ends 8, 8 being bent inwardly and underneath, and riveted or otherwise secured to the flanges 6, 6 of the supporting members 5, 5. The bends 9, 9 of the spring 7 are semi-circular in form, as shown. The spring 7, shown in Fig. 2, with its ends 8, 8, is provided with the bends 10, 10, of pointed or semi-elliptical form, instead of the semi-circular form shown at 9, 9, in Fig. 1. Each bend in the spring 7 is formed with a slot 11 (see Fig. 7) through which the hinged arms 3, 3, of the runnerblade 1 project, the cross-pins 4, 4, at the ends of the hinged arms, projecting across the slotted bends and within the same.

12 is the sole plate and 13 the heel plate of the skate, both of which are riveted to the spring. The modified form of spring, shown in Figs. 3 and 8, consists of double wires 14, 14, spaced as shown, the main portions of which extend the length of the runner-blade, and the remaining end portions 15, 15, being looped, as at 16, and bent inwardly and underneath, and secured to the vertical supporting members 5, 5. I y

In Figs. 3 and 8, the hinged arms 3, 3, and their cross-pins 4, 4, upon the runnerblade 1, interlock with the end loops 16, 16 at h double Swing i th a e reh ative manner as illustrated in the form-of skates shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

17, 17 are auxiliary cushion springs, preferably of tapering spiral form. They are interposed between the double wire spring 14, 14:, and the vertical supporting members 5, 5, and serve as resilient binders between the double wire spring 14:, 14; and the vertical supporting members 5, 5.

In action, the bearing springs are depressed vertically under the weight of the skater and the force of the impact, the hinged arms 3, 3, during the flexion of the springs, turning on the hinge pins or pivots 3 to guide the movement oif'the bent ends 9.

Having thus fully described the nature of my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:-

l. A spring skate con'iprising a runnerblade, vertical supporting members, a spring extending the length of the runner-blade and having its ends bent inwardly and un der the main section of the spring and securedto the supporting members, and sole and heel plates secured to the spring.

, 2. A. spring skate comprising a runnerblade having vertical supporting members and upwardly-extending end members, hinged arms upon the upwardly-extending end members, a spring extending the length of the runner-blade and having its ends bent inwardly and underneath and secured to the 7 tending the length of the runner-blade and having its ends bent inwardly and under the main section of the spring and secured to the supporting members, auxiliary cushion springs interposed between the main section of the spring and the supporting members,

and sole and heel plates secured to the spring. I e

49A skate comprising a runner-blade,

vertical supporting members, a double wire spring extending the length of the runnerblade and havin its ends bent into 100 s 7 and extending inwardly and under the main section of the spring and secured to the sup porting members, auxiliary cushion springs interposed between the'main section of the spring and the supporting members, and

sole and heel'plates securedto thespring. Uartomduly 16th, 1917.

ELIJA MISENERMIERS.

Signedin the presence of u s s B. Gammon, T, E. AUBER.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each; by addressing the Commissioner of Patents,

Washington, D. G. I

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2422228 *Dec 27, 1943Jun 17, 1947Ferrar BernardCombined skate and sandal
US4993725 *Apr 11, 1990Feb 19, 1991University Of Colorado Foundation, Inc.Unitary skate assembly having vertical spring means
US6105975 *Jan 30, 1998Aug 22, 2000Nike, Inc.Skate blade holding system
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/11.14
Cooperative ClassificationA63C1/24