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Publication numberUS1265266 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 7, 1918
Filing dateJan 25, 1913
Priority dateJan 25, 1913
Publication numberUS 1265266 A, US 1265266A, US-A-1265266, US1265266 A, US1265266A
InventorsJohn O Simpson
Original AssigneeRemington Arms & Ammunition Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sight for firearms.
US 1265266 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

33-255 OR 192659266 5R J. 0. SIMPSON.

SIGHTVFOR FIREARMS. APPLICATION FILED IAN-2.5. 1913. 1,265,266. Z0 5 Patented May 7,1918.

INVENTOR Arron/airs UNXTED STATES PATENT QFFIGE.

JOHN O. SIMPSON, OF ILION, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR TO REMINGTON ARMS & AMMU- NITION COMPANY, OF ILION, NEW YORK, A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

SIGHT. FOR FIREARMS.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented May '7, 1918.

Application filed January 25, 1913. Serial No. 744,105.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, J OHN O. SIMPSON, of Ilion, in the county of Herkimer and State of New York, have invented a certain new and useful Sight for Firearms, of which the following is a specification.

This invention has for its object the production of a sight for firearms adjustable for close and long range shooting, which s particularly simple in construction, econom cal in manufacture and highly eflicient and durable in use; and it consists in the combinations and novel features of construction hereinafter set forth and claimed.

In describing this invention reference is had to the accompanying drawing in which like characters designate corresponding parts in all the views.

Figure 1 is a plan view of my sight for firearms.

Fig. 2 is a left side elevation thereof, the contiguous portion of the barrel of a rifle being also shown, the leaf beingin horizontal position. i

Figs. 2 and 2 are opposite end elevations of parts seen in Fig. 2.

Fig. 3 is an elevation of my rifle sight containing modifications of construction, the leaf member being shown as swung into vertical position.

Fig. 4 is an elevation looking to the left of parts seen in Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a detail view of one form of a sheet metal detent spring.

Fig. 6 is a modified form of said spring.

Fig. 7 is a detail View of the slide of the sight illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2.

Figs. 8 and 9 are detail views of the parts of the slide shown in Figs. 3 and 4.

This sight is a military and sporting leaf sight and comprises, generally, a base adapted to be mounted on the firearm as the barrel of a rifle, a member as aleaf pivoted or hinged to the base and movable from a horizontal position in which it is used for point blank shooting into a vertical position in which it is used for long range shooting.

The sight also includes means for adjusting the leaf relatively to the barrel when the leaf is in its horizontal position in order to position the sight opening in the aiming line of the rifle, a slide adjustable lengthwise of the leaf and designed to be used to adjust the gun for different ranges when the leaf is set in vertical position, and a detent for holding the leaf in its horizontal or its vertical position. Some of the foregoing parts, may however be omitted, if desired.

All of the main parts of this sight with the exception of adjustin screws and the pivot or hinge pin are preferably formed of sheet metal, so that the manufacturing expense of the sight is reduced to a minimum.

1 is the base which includes an intermediate body portion and upturned ears or lugs 2 at opposite ends of the body portion, the body portion having its longitudinal edges beveled as shown at 3 in order to dove tail into a transverse groove as 4 in the barrel 5 of the rifle or firearm, the sides of this groove 4. being usually under-beveled or cut to coact with the beveled edges 3 of the body 1.

6 is the leaf, the leaf being also formed of sheet metal and having one end bent to form a tubular hearing or eye 7 and its other end 8 bent at an angle to the major part of said leaf. The bearing 7 encircles the hinge pin 9 which extends transversely through the lugs 3 and through said bearing, and the upturned portion 8 of the leaf 6 is formed with a sight opening as an open notch 10 in its edge.

The means previously alluded to for adjusting the leaf 6 when in its horizontal position, relatively to the barrel 5 of the firearm, includes a screw or threaded plug 11 threading through the leaf 6 and engaged at its lower end with the underlying surface of the gun as the upper face of the rifle barrel 5. Obviously by turning the screw, the lower end of the screw will be moved nearer, or farther away from, the face of the barrel in accordance with the direction in which the screw is turned, and hence the sight opening or notch 10 will be raised or lowered.

The leaf 6 is also formed with a lengthtiorfially engaging front and rear sides of the lea 6.

The slide 13 is also formed of sheet metal and, as seen in Fig. 7, may be formed of a single piece of sheet metal shaped to extend around the side edges of the leaf 6, or as seen in Figs. 3, 4, 8 and 9, said member may consist of two like parts 1 1 and which are held together by a screw 16, Figs. 3 and 4;, extending through one of said parts and threading into the other for clamping the parts 14: and 15 into frictional engagement with opposite sides of the leaf 6.

The slide 13 is adjustable to different heights along the slot 12 and is used to adjust the rifle to different ranges of shooting when the leaf 6 is swung into vertical position, such as shown in Figs. 3 and 4.

17 is one form of detent spring for holding the leaf 6 in either of its horizontal or vertical positions, said spring coacting with peripheral faces provided on the bearing 7 of the leaf and arranged at an angle to each other, as indicated at 18 and 19, Figs. 1, 2, 2 3 and 1.

The spring is sheet metal and its intermediate portion is convex or bowed, and its end portions slidably interlocked with the lugs 2, one of the interlocked parts being formed with a cutout or recess for receiving projecting parts of the other of said interlocking parts.

As shown in Figs. 2 and 5, the lugs 2 are formed with cutouts or recesses 20 at their bases, for receiving the projecting portions or tongues 21 on the spring 17.

As seen in Fig. 6, the spring may be formed with cutouts or recesses 22 in its ends which receive the bases of the lugs 2, the spring being formed with projections 23 at opposite ends of the cutouts 22 which projections extend on front and rear sides of the lugs 2. The surfaces 18 and 19 on the bearing 7 are concave and extend lengthwise of the bearing to conform to the convexity or bow of the spring 17 Obviously owing to the surfaces 18 and 19, and the spring 17, the leaf 6 will be held in either its horizontal or its vertical position. As indicated in dotted lines, Fig. 2, the spring is arranged to bear against the surface 18 near the apex of the angle formed by the surfaces 18, 19 which apex is arranged slightly' in front of the axis of the leaf 6 and the remaining portion of the surface 18 is spaced apart from the spring 17. This arrangement causes the spring 17 to hold the leaf 6 with the screw 11 against the barrel 5 irrespective of the adjustment of the screw 11.

My sight is particularly advantageous in that it can be economically manufactured without lessening the efficiency thereof.

ing. one end bent to form a tubular bearing,

and its opposite end bent at an angle to the major portion of the leaf and provided with a notched edge, the major portion of the leaf being provided with a lengthwise slot terminating short of said angularly extending part, a hinge pin extending transversely through the ears and through said tubular bearing of the leaf, a slide on the leaf and movable along the slot, a bow spring extending lengthwise of said bearing and having its intermediate portion in engagement with the bearing, and its ends engaging the ears of the base, and a screw extending through the leaf and having a part projecting on the lower side thereof, substantially as and for the purpose described.

2. A gun sight comprising a base having ears at opposite ends thereof, a leaf formed of a strip of sheet metal having one end bent to form a tubular bearing and its opposite end bent at an angle to the major portion of the strip and provided with anotch, the periphery of. said bearing being provided with a concave surface extending in the direction of the length of the bearing, a slide mounted on the strip, and a bow spring having its intermediate part in engagement with the concave surface of the bearing and its ends interlocked with the ears of the base for preventing displacement of the spring, substantially as and for the purpose specified.

3. A gun sight comprising a base having upturned ears at its opposite ends, a leaf comprising a strip of sheet meal having one end bent to form a tubular bearing and its opposite end bent at an angle to the major part of the leaf and provided with the sight opening, the major part of the leaf being provided with a lengthwise slot which terminates short of the bearing and of the angularly bent portion thereof, a hinge pin extending through the ears and through said tubular bearing, a slide on the leaf movable along the slot, and a bow spring extending lengthwise of said bearing and having its intermediate portion in engagement with said bearing, and its ends in engagement with said ears of the base, substantially as and for the purpose specified.

4. A gun sight comprising a base having ears at its opposite ends, a leaf formed of a strip of sheet metal and having one end bent to form a tubular bearing, the periphery of said bearing being provided with a concave surface extending lengthwise of the bearing, and a bow spring having its intermediate part in engagement with the concave surface aw arwML inn? nnnrnerm M W of the bearing, and its ends interlocked with, Herkimer, and State of New York, this 6th and abutting against, the ears of the base, day of January, 1913.

zubsltlantially as and for the purpose set JOHN 0 SIMPSON ort 5 In testimony whereof, I have hereunto Witnesses:

signed my name in the presence of two at A. C. SHEPARD,

testing Witnesses, at Ilion, in the county of JOHNSON MORGAN.

copies 0! this patent may he obtained for five cent: each, by addressing the commluloner of latent,

Washington, D. G."

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2864168 *Jul 5, 1956Dec 16, 1958Gen Motors CorpSight system for firearms
US5327654 *Jun 1, 1993Jul 12, 1994Parker Joseph SGun sight
US5369888 *Mar 19, 1993Dec 6, 1994Kay; Ira M.Wide field of view reflex gunsight
US5383278 *Jan 11, 1994Jan 24, 1995Kay; Ira M.Wide field of view reflex sight for a bow
US5813159 *Jan 10, 1994Sep 29, 1998Kay; Ira MarkWide field of view reflex gunsight
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/136
Cooperative ClassificationF41G1/28