Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1266050 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 14, 1918
Filing dateMar 20, 1915
Priority dateMar 20, 1915
Publication numberUS 1266050 A, US 1266050A, US-A-1266050, US1266050 A, US1266050A
InventorsAlva Leman Reynolds
Original AssigneeCommon Sense Pile Protector Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pile-protector.
US 1266050 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. L. REYNOLDS. FILE PROTECTOR.- APPLICATION FlLED MAR. 20. I915.

Patented May14,1918.

W- 2 mm flaw/M? f TED san'rns arena rare.

ALVA LEMAN REYNOLDS, 0F LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA, ASSIGNOR TO COMMON SENSE IPILE PROTECTOR COMPANY, OF LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA, A

CALIFORNIA.

CORPORATION OF FILE-PROTECTOR.

Application filed March 20, 1915. Serial No. 15,989.

To all whom it may concern: I

Be it known that I, ALVA 'LEMAN REY- NOLDS, a citizen of the United States, residing at Long Beach, in the county of Los Angeles and State of California, have invented a new and useful Pile-Protector, of which the following is a specification.

' This invention relates to that class of pile protectors in which a collar loosely encircling a pile is raised and lowered by float means actuated by wave and tide action, and intended to keep the surface of the pile free from all kinds of destructive life, as for instance, limnoria, teredo, barnacles and mussels.

An object 'of this invention is to construct a pile protector of said class, which will be cheaper to manufacture, will be more certain and efficient in action, and will be capable of economical construction, and will resist oxidation and wave force. I

A further object is to so construct the protector that it can be made of lasting material at a low price, also to guard against accumulations of sea growth upon the floats and also to so construct the floats that they will be long-lived and buoyant.

A further object is to so construct the protector that the floats may yield to the force of the waves in the direction of the movement thereof thus to minimize the likelihood of breaking the rings; also to minimiz the surface upon which the wave action may be effective to wrench the ring.

Other objects and advantages may appear from the subj oined detail description.

The accompanying drawings illustrate the invention.

Figure l is a fragmental perspective view of a pile protector constructed in accordance with this invention with plural rings, two of which are shown. Fragments of connections for another ring are also shown.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a pile protector constructed in accordance with this invention with only one ring as it may appear in place on a pile for operation between high and low tide level.

Fig. 3 is a detached view of one set of the metal parts of the invention as the same may be manufactured and assembled ready for shipment before the floats are attached.

The pile protector comprises a ring 1 which may be a piece of rod or wire of noncorrodible metal adapted to loosely encircle the pile a and having its ends 2, 3 adapted for connection with each other, to form a ring rotatable around and slidable up and down on thepile, said member also being bent-into loops l arranged at intervals for connection with swing arms 5 forming connectors adapted respectively to receive and to be secured to floats 6. V

.The connectors Y 5 may be links mainly straight and constructed of the same kind of rod or wire material of which the ring member is constructed, and the floats may be made of some suitable buoyant material best adapted to'resist the water action and to maintain buoyancy.

For economical and other reasons I at present regard whitecedar wood as the most desirable material for constructing the buoyant members or floats. Such white cedar wood should be well seasoned, treated with creosote and painted. Said floats as shown are cylindrical in form and provided with axial holes 7, so that the ends of the connecting links or swing arms therefor may be inserted through the floats from end to end and bent over at right angles as at 8, forming swivel connections upon which the floats can rotate. The links 5 may be looped in loops 4t as shown at 9 and are thus pivotally and hingedly connected with the ring. This may be done at a place of manufacture and the rings and links thus shipped to the place of use where the straight ends of the links of the uppermost ring will be inserted through the floats respectively and then bent over, said floats being thus respectively swiveled and hingedly connected to the ring by a link member to positively move the ring up and to allow the ring to move down responsive to the wave and tide action upon the float.

The loops 4: are angularly disposed relative to ring 1, the arrangement allowing a free radial and tangential oscillating movement of swing arms 5 relative to the pile, and a free longitudinal and rotative movement of ring 1 upon the pileresponsive to the wave movements.

It is understood that the ring may be variously constructed and that the float connectors may also be constructed in various ways and may be variously attached, and it is understood that the form shown is typical of that in which I now regard as the best form. in which the invention may be emthe load thus imposed upon them and to allow them to cause the rings to move up and allow them to move down responsive to the wave and tide action.

I claim:

1. A pile protector comprising a rlng i, adapted to loosely encircle the pile; and

buoyantmembers supporting the ring; said buoyant members being loosely connected to the ring and otherwise disconnected from each other, and contacting independently of each other with the pile.

A pile protector comprising a ring adapted to loosely encircle the pile and buoyant members loosely connected to and supporting the ring at points equi-distant from each other and moving independently of each other to move the ring.

3. A pile protector comprising a ring adapted to loosely encircle the pile, swing arms having a loose swivel connection with the ring, and buoyant members rotating upon said swing arms.

l. A pile protector comprising a ring adapted to loosely encircle the pile, swing arms having a loose swivel connection with the ring and buoyant members connected to said swing arms.

5. A pile protector comprising an annular ring loosely encircling the pile, swing arms attached to the ring, and buoyant members attached to the swing arms, said buoyant 1 7. A pile protector comprising a Wire ring having loops thereon, Wire swing arms having loose connection with said loops respectively, and buoyant members sliding upon said wire arms respectively.

8. A pile protector comprising a flexible collar for loosely encircling a pile, and a plurality of buoyant members loosely connected to the collar and adapted to move over the surface of the pile under the action of the water.

9. A pile protector comprising a flexible collar, and aplurality of buoyant members mounted for independent movement with reference to the collar.

10. A pile protector comprising a flexible collar, and a plurality of buoyant rotatably mounted members loosely connected to the collar.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand at Los Angeles, California, this 15th day of March 1915.

ALVA LEMAN REYNOLDS.

In presence of- JAMES R. TOWNSEND, FREDERIC M. KEENEY.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents. Washington, .D. 0.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4676692 *Oct 24, 1984Jun 30, 1987Thomas HendersonUnderwater growth inhibition
US5026212 *May 13, 1988Jun 25, 1991Iev International Pty. LimitedApparatus for the combatting of marine growth on offshore structures
US5040923 *Sep 26, 1990Aug 20, 1991Iev International Pty. LimitedApparatus for the preventing of marine growth of offshore structures
US5765968 *Dec 13, 1995Jun 16, 1998Petronas Research & Scientific Services Sdn. BhdApparatus for eliminating and preventing marine growth on offshore structures
US5791818 *Jul 22, 1996Aug 11, 1998Impact Surge Sdn. Bhd.Apparatus for the combatting of underwater growth on submerged structures
US5894808 *Oct 23, 1997Apr 20, 1999Miyoshi; IsaoFloating deposit removal system
US6532885 *Feb 15, 2002Mar 18, 2003Marcos Roberto CordobaMooring device
US6848863 *Feb 7, 2003Feb 1, 2005Cso Aker Maritime, Inc.Engineered material buoyancy system and device
US7097387Jan 5, 2005Aug 29, 2006Technip FranceEngineered material buoyancy system and device
US7322307 *Apr 23, 2004Jan 29, 2008Perry George JBuoyant bumper system
US7765632Jun 4, 2007Aug 3, 2010Oceaneering International, Inc.Subsea conduit cleaning tool
US7971306Jan 16, 2008Jul 5, 2011Oceaneering International, Inc.Subsea conduit cleaning tool
US8689386Jul 11, 2009Apr 8, 2014Oceaneering International, Inc.Subsea conduit cleaning skid
US20030143035 *Feb 7, 2003Jul 31, 2003Metin KarayakaEngineered material buoyancy system and device
US20050117974 *Jan 5, 2005Jun 2, 2005Technip FranceEngineered material buoyancy system and device
US20080135232 *Jun 4, 2007Jun 12, 2008Kinton LawlerSubsea Conduit Cleaning Tool
US20080282957 *May 15, 2008Nov 20, 2008Rick PalmbyBoat scrubber
US20090178216 *Jan 16, 2008Jul 16, 2009Oceaneering International, Inc.Subsea Conduit Cleaning Tool
US20100180915 *Jul 11, 2009Jul 22, 2010Oceaneering International, Inc.Subsea Conduit Cleaning Skid and Method
EP1642655A1 *Sep 28, 2005Apr 5, 2006Ecoguard Systems Ltd.Apparatus for removing attachments deposited on underwater structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification405/211
International ClassificationE02B17/00
Cooperative ClassificationB63B59/04, E02B17/0017
European ClassificationB63B59/04, E02B17/00D