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Publication numberUS1267882 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1918
Filing dateAug 2, 1917
Priority dateAug 2, 1917
Publication numberUS 1267882 A, US 1267882A, US-A-1267882, US1267882 A, US1267882A
InventorsHarrison D Mcfaddin
Original AssigneeHarrison D Mcfaddin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hand-lamp for therapeutic purposes.
US 1267882 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. D. McFADDIN.

HAND LAMP FOR THERAPEUTIC PURPOSES. APPLICATION FILED 16.2. 1911.

Patented May 28,1918.

2 SHEETS-SHEET I,

$1 mow/neg H. D. McFADDIN. HAND LAMP FOIR THERAPEUTIC PURPOSES. APPLICATION FILED Aue.2, 1917.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

Patented May 28,1918.

types.

tiQRISON 1D. MOFADDIN, OF EAST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY.

HID-LAMP FOR THERAPEUTIC PURPOSES.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed August 2, 1917. Serial No. 184,051.

Io all whom it may concern:

Be it known that ll, HARRISON D. MoFAn- DIN, a citizen of the United States, residing in East Orange, county of Essex, and State of New Jersey, have invented a certain new and useful Hand Lamp for Therapeutic Purposes, of which the following is a specification.

Medical science has established that the health, strength andelasticity of body tissue, nerve and bone are dependent, mainly, upon the proper circulation of the blood for the carrying out of its functions, among others, of restoring waste tissue, and assisting in the elimination of the waste products constantly forming in the system. If the flow of blood is normal, the body, in the absence of organic ailments, is healthy and strong, while, if vthe circulation is sluggish, asickly or weak condition results, manifesting itself, frequently, in local congestions and inflammations of well known specific llhe present invention is aimed at preventing, as well as relieving, the pathological conditionsspecified, as well as numerous others which will readily suggest themselves to the medical profession.

The profession has recognized the utility of, and has employed to some extent, strong lights for the purpose of infusing heat to accelerate blood circulation, and 1n applying natures method of destroying germs by exposing them to combined light and heat,

so that therapeutists now recognize that through the employment of light rays, prop erly. applied, congestion is relaxed, painameliorated andrelieved, and the vital parts stimulated.

While the employment of light rays for the foregoing purposes has'long been known, and various methods of applying such rays employed, all of the constructions heretofore used have been open to serious objections, many of them causing burning of the patient if the device were positioned too close to the body, while, if positioned at a greater distance therefrom, they would not heat the parts sufficiently, and, as a result,

the desired therapeutic effects would not.

be produced. Accordingly, the manipulation of the prior art devices has required great caution, and the results therefrom have not given the desired satisfaction even in the hands of physicians. Such devices have present generally been built on a' more or less hit or miss principle, without any particular attention being paid to the proper projec- -manipulated hand lamp for therapeutic purposes, based on scientific principles, so as to produce the proper quality of light, the waves and rays of which are so distributed and projected as to produce maximum benefit without fear of burning of the body tissues.

Experimentation has shown that the infra-red rays are the heat rays of the spec trum of incandescent carbon which have the greatest power of penetration, and with this in mind, the first object of the present invention is to provide a lamp which will deliver to the patient these infra-red rays in such manner that their penetrating qualities will not be interfered with through the distortion of the rays. -For this reason, the

rays are parallel, and all conditions which would interfere with the paralleling of said rays are obviated. When delivered in this manner, the rays are conducive to maximum sub-cutaneous treatment, have the greatest power of penetration, and give the best results, whereas when the rays are crossed or brought to a focus, as heretofore, the infra-red rays beyond the focus are usually distorted or thrown into shadow by the remainingrays of the spectrum so that their Patented May as, tea. I

penetrating power and heat value are lost.

In the accompanying drawings I have illustrated one practical embodiment of the invention, but the construction therein shown is to be understood as illustrative, only, and not as defining the limits of the invention.

Figure 1 is a central section of-a therapeutic lamp constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Figs. 2 and 3 are diagrammatic central sections of a lamp reflector, Fig. 2 illustratingthe type heretofore commonly employed, and Fig. 3 illustrating the type of the present invention. In order that the importance of the present invention may be clearly understood, theoretical light rays projections are shown in these figures.

Referringto the drawing, A indicates the made bell shape, as shown, and is provided around its side with a plurality of ventilating openings at. The rear portion of the base shell A is formed into a tubular, cylindrical portion a, through which is adapted to be thrust an insulating bushing B provided at its rear end with a flange b. The bushing B fits tubular portion a tightly and forms a rigid support or seat for the threaded portion 0 of a lamp socket C. The major part of. socket O is inclosed in a thimblelike casing D on which is rigidly mounted an interiorly threaded stem 03, in which is adapted to be screwed the stem of a handle .E. Handle E is provided with a central passage through which a cable F, connected with a suitable source of electrical energy, leads to the lamp socket C and is adapted to energize a lamp G- screwed into the threaded portion 0 of the socket. The thimble-like casing D is secured to the base shell A by means of a plurality of screws h which thread into the base shell, as clearly shown, and a piece of insulation H, which is positioned between the back of the socket C and the closed end of the thimble, causes the.

shoulder of the socket at the base of the threaded portion 0 thereof to be maintained tightly pressed against the rear end of the insulating bushing B and, at the same time, insulate the socket C from the thimble. In this manner, thimble D' is rigidly secured to the base shell A, the handle E is made rigid therewith, and the socket is held tightlv in place.

Cooperating withthe forwardend of the base shell A is a reflector casing I provided at its rear end with a flange z fitting into the open forward end of the shell A. Within the reflector casing I is positioned the reflector proper J. =Reflector J is of less diameter than the open end of its casing I and is adapted to be seatedwithinsaid casing with itsouter edge in engagement with the inner wall of the casing in substantially line contact at a point intermediate the forward and rear edges'of the casing.

The rear edge of the reflector is provided with an inturned flange j having holes through which may be passed binding screws j, the opposite ends of which thread into the base shell A, as clearly shown. It is manifest that, when the screws y" are tightened, reflector J is pulled tightly within its casing I and said casing is, in turn, jammed tightly against the forward edge of shell A; In this manner, the reflector and base shell of the lamp, which is preferably materials, due to quick changes in temperature, do not affect the integrity of the structure, which is, practically at all times, under more or less tension.

Reflector J is, preferably, highly polished, while that portion of easing I intermediate the forward edge of the reflector and the forward end of said casing is matted. Moreover, the parts are so relatively situated and the reflector is so shaped that the filament of the lamp G will be at the focus of the reflector, which is dished in such manner that the reflected rays from the filament are projected forwardly in parallel relation. Lamp G is preferably of the type embodying a carbon filament, and, by thus paralleling the rays, the penetrating peculiarities of the infra-red rays of incandescent carbon are preserved, the same being projected beyond the open front of easing I in a manner ideal for therapeutic treatment.

Moreover, by paralleling the rays, they will never come to a focus beyond the open end of the casing, as has heretofore so frequently been the case with therapeutic lamps, and which has occasioned burning of the patient when the body was at such distance from the lamp as to substantially coincide with the focus of the reflector, while, if these prior art lamps were either closer to, or farther away from, the patient than the focal length, a great loss of heat would result and the penetrating influence of the rays would be lost because of the intersections thereof. By matting the inner surface of the casing forward of the reflector, all those rays which cannot be satisfactorily projected in parallel relation are absorbed or diffused and do not conflict with the proper projection of the remaining rays.

A marked advantage of the present structure is that, by projecting the rays of light and heat in parallel relation forwardly through the front of the casing, the heat rays are ejected from the structure and are not concentrated upon the bulb or the lamp parts. This increases the life of the filament since a rapid burning out thereof is obviated, this having proved in prior art lamps to be universally disadvantageous Furthermore, the area of heat generated and projected is much greater in the lamp of this invention than in the focusing type of lamp heretofore employed.

1 The precluding of undue heating of the lamp parts is further brought about by the peculiarities in construction of the lamp, it being noted that rearwardly of reflector J, and within the rear portion of casing I, is a circulatory air space which communicates with the outer atmosphere through the apertures or air vents a in the base shell A. By allowing air to freely circulate about the back of reflector J, undue heating of the reflector is precluded, and this portion of itacaea the reflector, as well as the base shell and associated, parts, are maintained relatively cool at all times, so that the operator is not apt to be burned should his hand come in contact with the rear portion of the lamp.

In order that the flow of current at the lamp may be readily controlled, a suitable switch lever 70 is associated with socket C and operates through an aperture is formed that, at twoor three times the focal length,

in thimble D, as clearly shown. The lamp of this invention is notable for its ease in assembling and remarkable rigidity after assemblage. There are no loose joint connections which will wabble or rattle, and the whole may be readily manipulated through the medium of handle E.

In order that the method of projection of light rays of this invention may be clearly differentiated from the prior art, l[ have diagrammatically illustrated in Figs.'2 and 3 the manner in which prior art lamps deliver the rays to the patient, and that by which the present invention accomplishes the superior result. In Fig. 2 ll designates the reflector which is here shown as of the shape universally employed. Within the reflector is positioned a lamp the center of illumination of which is designated Z, while Z denotes, in Fig. 3, .the center of illumination in the lamp of the invention. In practically all: prior lamps the reflector I has been of the focusingtype, the light emanating from the source Z, being reflected from the interior I to substantially a focus L and the focal length of the reflector has almost universally been made extremely short, as shown.

It will be manifest that, with such a construction, if the lamp is positioned the focal length of the reflector from the patient so that the body will coincide with. the focus point L the heat at this point will be tremendous, and, in the majority of prior art lamps, it is sufficiently great to scorch paper or cause the same to break into a flame after a comparatively short period. In other words, in the type of lamp shown inFig. 2 substantially every ray of heat is concentrated at L, and if thepatient is subjected fiolto the heat at this point a serious burn, and

one which is extremely dificult to heal, may result. Between the points L and Z, the heat is less than directly at the point L, but is nevertheless extremely high so that in order to safely usethe lamp on a patient, it is necessary to have it fart-her av. ay than -,the focal, length' Z,L. Those familiar "1 iwiththe pro ection of light, however, will immediately see that beyond the focal length the heat and light decrease very rapidly so it is practically negligible. It is thus only within a very limited zone immediatelybeyond the point L that any actual benefits may be derived, and, accordingly, requires that the lamp be manipulated in the hands.

of a skilled practitioner in order that burning may be avoided and still sufficient heat be applied to accomplish the desired result.

Another and important disadvantage of the lamp of 2 is that beyond the pointllr the infra-red rays of a carbon filament are in shadow from the remaining rays and lose their power of penetration so that the real benefit of these rays cannot be had beyond the point L, while the application of the rays between the points Z and L is made impossible. by the excessive heat.

For these reasons, it is absolutely impossible to obtain an efficient treatment by a lamp of the character shown in Fig. 2, since these lamps are constructed on a hit-andmiss principle, and operate on the same principle. llt is not argued that a lamp of this character will not prove beneficial to some extent but its efliciency cannot compare with a lamp of the type shown in Fig. 3, wherein the rays are projected from a source of illumination Z in parallel lines so that the penetrating qualities of the infra-red rays are preserved. Moreover, in a lamp of this invention the heat and light very gradually decrease as the distance from the reflector increases. Thus, While the heat of the lamp may not be excessive at six or eight inches from the reflector, said heat will not appreciably change for double that distance and, moreover, may be appreciably felt at a distance of three feet. In fact experiment has shown that heat rays of the lamp of Fig. 3 have a warm penetrating eflect at a distance of several feet, while the lamp of Fig. 2 would be entirely inoperative at a distance greater than six inches while employing the same amount of electricity. It w1ll,

of course, be understood that lamps of this "ing it further assists in the paralleling of the rays throu h the ability of this matted surface to di iurse or absorb such rays which cannot be conveniently paralleled. In practice, the matting-of the interior of said housing may be accomplished either through the coating of said surface with a non-reflecting medium, or in anyother suit able wa Moreover, by causing practically all of t e heat units to be promoted out of the housing the heating of the housing is minimized, and this is further facilitated by the substantially knife-edged contacts between the parts. Inthis respect, it will be noted that the outer edge of the reflector J has a knife-edged engagementwith the interior. of the housing I, while the shell A makes a substantially line-contact with housing I. Contacts of this character preclude the rapid transmission of heat from one part to another, and the dead air or c1 rculatory space back of the reflector J withln the housing forms a most eflicient insulating medium against the heating of the parts.

In view of the scientific principles which are carried out in the construction .as hereinbefore specifically described, the lamp of this invention is so constituted that it may be operated by the patient, himself, without fear of deleterious results through burning, or otherwise, and is, therefore, in marked contrast to the prior art devices which could only be safely employed by skilled physicians or persons familiar with body tissue as well as dangers to be avoided. The present invention renders therapeutic treatment financially within the reach of all persons requiringthe same, whereas heretofore it has generally been necessary in order to safely administer the same, to attend laboratories, or

clinics specially equipped for this purpose.

Having thus fully described the invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. A hand lamp for therapeutic purposes embodying a lamp, a polished reflector therefor, Which reflector is so shaped and positioned relative to the filament of the lamp as to project the rays thereof in parallel relation, and a housing for said reflector, which housing projects forwardly of the forward edge of the reflector and is provided with a matted interior, rays which cannot be satisfactorily proected in parallel relation by the reflector are absorbed or difl'used and the penetrating qualities of the infra-red rays are preserved.

- 2. A hand lamp for therapeutic purposes embodying a base shell, a lamp socket supported thereby, a reflector housing seated at the forward end of the base shell, and a reflector seated within the housin and threaded connections extending direct y between the' reflector and the base shell for drawing the reflectortoward the base shell to seat the reflector within the housing and simultaneously draw the housing into rigid engagement with the shell.

3. A hand lamp for therapeutic purposes embodying a base shell, a lamp carrying socket supported thereby, a flaring reflector housing seated in the forward end of the base shell, a reflector seated within the housing, and means directly connecting the reflector to the base shell for drawing the reflector toward the base shell to wedge said reflector within the housing and hold the housing firmly, to its seat within the base shell, whereby the reflector is placed under tension and the housing under compresslon, and the parts remain rigidly secured towhereby those gether irrespective of changes in te1npera- -ture due to the heat of the lamp.

4. A hand lamp for therapeutic purposes embodying a base shell, a lamp socket sup ported thereby, a lamp associated with the socket, a polished reflector posltloned rearwardly of the lamp and shaped to pro ect the rays of light impinging the same in parallel relation, a reflector housing engaging with the base shell and projecting forwardly beyond the reflector, that portion of the housing which projects beyond the forward edge of thereflector being matted, whereby the rays which cannot be satisfactorily projected in parallel relation by the reflector are absorbed or difl'used and the penetrating qualities of the infra-red rays are preserved, in combination with means for drawing the reflector toward the base shell for simultaneously seating the reflector within the housing and drawing the housing into rigid engagement with the shell.

5. A hand lamp for therapeutic purposes embodying a base shell, a lamp socket supported thereby, a flaring reflector housing seated in the forward end of the base shell and provided with a matted interior, a polished reflector seated within the housing, and so shaped and positioned relative to a lamp supported by the socket as to project the rays of light impinging the same in parallel rays, and means for drawing the reflector into the base shell for the purpose of wedging said reflector within the housing and forcing said housing firmly to its seat in the base shell, the reflector servin to project the rays of the lamp in paralle relation beyond the forward end of the housing and the matted portion of said housing operating to diffuse or absorb those rays which cannot be satisfactorily so absorbed.

6. A hand lamp for therapeutic purposes I embodyin a base shell, a lamp socket mounted flmreon and supported thereby, a lamp associated with said socket, a flarin reflector housing seated in the forward end of the shell, a reflector seated within the housing, direct connections between the reflector and the base shell for drawing the reflector tightly within the housin and simultaneously forcing said housing tlghtly to its seat within the base shell, whereby the housmg is, clamped between the reflector and the base shell.

hand lamp for therapeutic purposes embodying a 'base shell, a lamp socket mounted thereon and supported thereby, a lamp assoclated with said socket, a flarin reflector housing seated in the forward en of the shell, a reflector seated within the housing, means cooperating with the base shell for drawing the reflector tightly with in the housing and simultaneously forcing said housing tightly to its seat within the base shell, said base shell being provided with openings to allow of the circulation of air through the interior thereof and rearwardly of the reflector for the purpose of thereinto, a casing for housing the remainder of said socket, and a'handle rigid with the casing, in combination with a reflector housing having a portion fitted into the forward end of the shell, a reflector positioned within the housing, and means for drawing the reflector toward the shell, whereby the periphery of the reflector is jammed within the housing and said housing forced tightly against the forward edge of the shell.

9. A hand lamp for therapeutic purposes embodying a base shell, a lamp socket mounted thereon and partially projecting thereinto, and a casing for housing the remainder of the socket, in combination with a flaring reflector housing seated at the forward end of the base shell, a reflector positioned within the housing, means for drawing the remainder within the shell, whereby the periphery of the reflector is jammed within the housing and the housing forced tightly to its seat within the shell, and a handle for manipulating the lamp.

10. A hand lamp for therapeutic purposes embodying a base shell having ventilating apertures, a lamp socket cooperating therewith, a reflector housing seated on the base shell, a reflector positioned within said housing and spaced therefrom so as to provide an air insulating space between the housing and reflector, and means for drawing the reflector toward the base shell for wedging the reflector within the housing and simultaneousl y forcing the housing to its seat on the base shell, the reflecting surface of said reflector being of such conformation as to reflect light rays in parallelism, in combination with an incandescent lamp having its filament located substantially in the focus of the reflecting surface.

11. A- hand lamp for therapeutic purposes embodying a lamp, a polished reflector therefor, which reflector is so shaped and positioned relative to the filament of the lamp as to project the rays thereof in parallel relation, and a housing for said reflector, which housing projects forwardly from the forward edge of the reflector and is provided with an interior adapted to absorb or diffuse light rays and impinging the same, whereby substantially all of the rays leaving the lamp housing are projected in parallel relation and the penetrating qualities of the infra-red rays are preserved.

12. A hand lamp for therapeutic purposes embodying a lamp, means positioned rear.- wardly of the lamp for reflecting such rays as impinge the same in parallel relation to one another, and means circumferentially of the reflecting means for diffusing or absorb-- ing those rays which cannot satisfactorily be projected in parallel relation, whereby the penetrating qualities of the infra-red rays are preserved.

13. A hand lamp for therapeutic purposes embodying a lamp, a casing therefor, that portion of the casing rearwardly of the lamp being polished and so shaped and positioned relative to the filament of the lamp as to project the rays thereof in parallel relation, and the portion of easing forwardly of the reflecting portion being matted, whereby those rays which cannotbe satisfactorily projected in parallel relation by the reflecting portion are absorbed or diffused and the penetrating qualities of the infra-red rays are preserved.

14. A hand lamp for therapeutic purposes embodying a base shell, a lamp supported thereby, a flaring reflector housing seated at the forward edge of the base shell, a reflector seated within the housing, thereflector having a greater flare than the housing, and means for drawing the reflector toward the base shell, whereby 1 said reflector is wedged within the housing and the housing firmly held to its seat at the forward end of the base shell, the diflerence in the flare of the housing and reflector providing a dead air space between the back of the reflector and the housing for the purpose of facilitating the escape from-the housing of the heat of the reflector.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification.

HARRISON D. MGFADDIN.

lib

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2670656 *Nov 25, 1947Mar 2, 1954Braymer Lawrence ETelescope
US3654455 *Aug 20, 1969Apr 4, 1972Holophane Co IncLuminaire
US5036446 *Sep 19, 1990Jul 30, 1991Roberto QuintanillaLamp handle cover system for surgical lamps
US5707142 *Oct 9, 1996Jan 13, 1998Musco CorporationLighting fixture
US6652113 *Oct 1, 2001Nov 25, 2003Robert J. TantDual mode indirect fluorescent lighting fixture
WO1990002292A1 *Aug 23, 1989Mar 8, 1990Transmedical CorpLamp handle cover system for surgical lamps
Classifications
U.S. Classification607/90, 362/346, 362/304, 362/350, 362/399
Cooperative ClassificationA61N5/06